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Isabel

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Hello, I'm Isabel!
I am currently a student at UCSB, pursuing a degree in Communications with art and French minors. I love to attempt to speak French and am always ready for discussing my dislike of the Impressionists. In my free time I enjoy yoga, petting dogs, and going to concerts all over southern CA.
I started tutoring in high school and have continued helping students all over the world since then. My first job was helping students from Korea, which included ESL help and assistance with essays, as well as eating delicious snacks and learning about Kpop!
For the last year I have been studying abroad, where I continued to tutor. While I studied in Paris I tutored a boy who had just moved there from China. It was a lovely and rewarding mix of deciphering Chinese and teaching English, with some French mixed in.
I continued to tutor through the Workaway program, where I taught English for two weeks in the Canary Islands, and for a week in Lisbon, Portugal.
I have taught every age and pretty much every level of English by this point. I am especially skilled in essay writing and grammar. Let's write some essays and talk about some books!
I know tutoring can seem like a drag so I like to make it more enjoyable for the student. I incorporate creativity and truly believe in the magic of walking around the room or just moving your body every once in a while.

Isabel’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: University of California-Santa Barbara - Current Undergrad, Communications

Test Scores

ACT English: 30

ACT Reading: 35

ACT Science: 31

SAT Verbal: 730

SAT Writing: 720

AP English Literature: 4

AP English Language: 4

AP US History: 4

AP European History: 4

AP Psychology: 4

AP Human Geography: 4

Hobbies

Photography, art, yoga, avid concert-goer, will pet any dog I meet, always on the hunt for vegan ice cream

Tutoring Subjects

ACT English

ACT Writing

College English

Comparative Literature

English

ESL/ELL

Essay Editing

High School English

Homework Support

Literature

Math

Pre-Algebra

Public Speaking

SAT Reading

SAT Writing and Language

Study Skills and Organization

Summer

Test Prep

Writing


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

I believe in teamwork in teaching. I work through a problem with a student and try to never make them feel dumb or singled out. Any problem has steps to completion, and these can be solved in a comfortable and safe environment.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

I would ask them what they think their needs are. Once we have discussed where the problems lie, we make a plan. We talk about what we will work on together and what problems we will try to solve. Once we are clear on what needs to get done, we dig in.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

I do not like to answer problems directly. Rather, I would point the student in the right direction by referring to a certain passage or asking leading questions. This gives students the tools and skills to solve difficult problems step by step on their own.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

I like to make tutoring lighthearted and stress-free. I like to take small breaks where we stand up or move to different seats. The work is broken up into bite size chunks so that they don't get overwhelmed. I also like to be excited about whatever we are learning, as that will create a happier and more willing student.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

I will spend time on that concept. I would also bring it up in later lessons as well. We would work on figuring out what the difficulty is, and then address how to overcome it. This could be by assigning practice for the next lesson, as well as finding new approaches to the problem.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

We would take a break every page, every couple of paragraphs, or at every natural break in the text. Then I would ask general questions, such as who was the passage about/what happened, as well as more specific questions regarding certain quotes or instances. Review would be strengthened by reading something the student is interested in, or something that would hold their attention.