A photo of Max, a tutor from Rochester Institute of Technology

Max

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I've always had a passion for learning and a drive to excel, and I hope to foster that in students as well. I believe that anyone can succeed if they're given the opportunity and support necessary to do so.

Max’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: Rochester Institute of Technology - Current Undergrad, Game Design and Development

Test Scores

SAT Composite: 2240

SAT Math: 760

SAT Verbal: 750

SAT Writing: 730

Hobbies

Writing, musical composition, exercise, tabletop games

Tutoring Subjects

Algebra

C++

College English

College Essays

Computer Game Design

Computer Programming

English

English Grammar and Syntax

Essay Editing

Geometry

High School English

Homework Support

HTML

JavaScript

Math

Other

Pre-Algebra

Psychology

Reading

SAT Reading

SAT Verbal

Social Sciences

Summer

Technology and Computer Science

Test Prep

Writing


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

I focus not just on showing students how to do something, but on working alongside them step by step so that they can build a deeper understanding of the problem-solving process.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

Start by directly working through problems and concepts with them, and then start posing questions and challenges that demand more independent work. If the student has trouble, ask them questions to test them on their understanding and, without explicitly saying what they need to do, lead them towards the correct answer.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

Failure can be disheartening, so it's important to remind the student that they don't have to be perfect but, if they keep working hard and exploring different approaches to study, they CAN improve. Recognition and appreciation for the successes they do achieve are just as important, as this reminds them that their efforts aren't being wasted.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

Start off with common strategies they can use - "blocking" text into chunks, picking out important parts of the selection when skimming, and finding a note-taking process that works for them. If these aren't enough, talk to them to work out the specific problems they're having, and work together to find a more specific, personal solution.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

Try to figure out if there's a specific stumbling block for them. If we can't identify one, it's possible that the process as a whole is still unclear to them; make sure to break it down into every major step, explaining why and how each one comes into play, and walk them through some examples.

How do you evaluate a student's needs?

The best starting point is to ask! While students may not know the exact details of where they're having trouble, they should at least know the general problem area.