A photo of Jessica, a tutor from UNC Greensboro

Jessica

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Hello, and I look forward to working with you!
A few tid bits about me- I was born and bred in North Carolina, and I currently reside in Greensboro, NC with my husband who is a trained chef of 20+ years and our 2 year old son, Jace.
I have taught almost ten years, mostly at the middle grades level. I have taught several different subject areas, including 6th grade math and social studies, 7th grade language arts and social studies and 9th grade English I and World History. Whatever I am teaching I try to make it a fun and interesting experience for both the students and myself. When tutoring I try to make it a personalized, individual experience for the student.
My husband and I have decided that I will stay at home with Jace for a few years, so I have chosen to work from home. It has definitely been an interesting adjustment going from a full-time, classroom teacher to a full-time, stay-at-home mom, but I have absolutely loved seeing Jace grow and develop over the past year!
Again, can't wait to meet you, and I am excited to start working with you.

Jessica’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: UNC Greensboro - Bachelors, Middle Grades Education and History

Graduate Degree: UNC Pembroke - Masters, Reading Education

State Certified Teacher

Hobbies

In my free time I enjoy watching NFL and NBA games with my husband and son, spending quality time with family and friends, and watching true crime shows and action movies as well as some of the classic cartoons, like Tom & Jerry, Looney Tunes and the 70s Scooby Doo. My husband and I like catching a good movie matinee show at the local theater, and I love playing matching games on my iPad or phone. (I admit…I have a bit of an addiction to a few of these games!:)

Tutoring Subjects

10th Grade Reading

10th Grade Writing

11th Grade Reading

11th Grade Writing

12th Grade Reading

12th Grade Writing

1st Grade Reading

1st Grade Writing

2nd Grade Reading

2nd Grade Writing

3rd Grade Reading

3rd Grade Writing

4th Grade Reading

4th Grade Writing

5th Grade Reading

5th Grade Writing

6th Grade Reading

6th Grade Writing

7th Grade Reading

7th Grade Writing

8th Grade Reading

8th Grade Writing

9th Grade Reading

9th Grade Writing

ACCUPLACER Reading Comprehension Prep

ACCUPLACER Sentence Skills Prep

ACCUPLACER WritePlacer Prep

ACT Writing

Adult Literacy

African-American History

History

College English

College Level American History

College World History

Comparative Literature

Creative Writing

Elementary School Reading

Elementary School Writing

English

Essay Editing

European History

Expository Writing

GED Prep

GED Reasoning Through Language Arts

GED Social Studies

High School English

High School Level American History

High School World History

High School Writing

Homework Support

IB History

IB History SL

ISEE Prep

ISEE- Lower Level

Literature

Middle School Reading

Middle School Reading Comprehension

Middle School Writing

Other

PSAT Writing Skills

Reading

SAT Writing and Language

Social studies

SSAT Prep

SSAT- Elementary Level

Test Prep

World History

Writing


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

As an educator, I have a passion to see my students' academic growth. I live for those "Aha!" moments! In order to get my students to that point, I believe that I must meet the student where he or she starts and move from there. Although it can be difficult with an entire class of students, I strive to make each student's educational experience as individualized as possible. This requires me to keep the lines of communication open, conduct lessons and require assignments that are meaningful and relevant to the students, and cater to various learning styles. I want to reach every student and see every student succeed. I'm a strong advocate of competency-based and project based learning, believing that students learn at their own pace and need to be able to apply the concepts in order to most effectually understand and retain the information.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

During my first session with a student, I try my best to get to know the student-not just as a client, but as an individual with his or her own learning style and worthwhile interests. In addition to this, I try to gather information about the student's academic needs from his or her perspective, and I try to informally assess their areas of needs and strengths.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

In my experience I have noticed that in order to help a student become an independent, lifelong learner requires that I individualize their instruction, allow them opportunities to connect the concepts to their lives and the real world, and tap into their interests and involve aspects in the lesson plans and tasks that include points of interest for the student. Once motivated and able to see the relevance of what they are learning, students tend to be more interested in learning more. In addition to this, during the course of teaching I make sure that students have as much hands-on opportunities with the material as possible. Rather than my being the sage on the stage and telling the student to do this or think this, I involve the student in the learning process as much as possible.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

I help students stay motivated by first getting to know them as individuals, and showing genuine and sincere interest in them--their interests, likes and dislikes, and hobbies. I also learn how they most effectively learn and what instructional strategies may work most effectually for the student. I then try to include what I know about the student in my plans and activities. If I know of something that the student can do or read that touches on the student's interests, I can most often keep the student's attention and keep his/her motivation level up.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

I try my best to get to the root and heart of the issue by looking at formal assessment results, if available, administering informal assessments with the student, and simply talking with the student about his/her challenges and what he/she believes maybe causing the disconnect. After the issue/s is uncovered, I try to create and conduct an instructional plan that is individualized to the student's academic needs.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

As with every student, no matter their subject area challenges, I assess them. Depending on the student's grade level and his/her particular challenges with their reading comprehension, I move from there. For instance, many middle school students struggle in their comprehension with nonfiction texts. If working with such a student, I would pick sample, grade-appropriate, nonfiction texts that are focused on topics that interest the student, as well as pull texts that he/she will see in his/her class. We would work through the text together, highlighting key points and features, making note of key text features, practicing chunking the text and summarizing the text. These instructional reading methods are often effective for students who have issues comprehending this type of text.

What strategies have you found to be most successful when you start to work with a student?

When beginning my work with new students, I like to first get to know them personally--what are their interests, their hobbies, their thoughts and feelings about school, etc. I tell a bit about myself as well, in an effort to form a sense of camaraderie and establish a personal, human connection, which is sometimes difficult in an online setting. After that, I conduct an informal assessment based on the information that I have gathered about the student's academic needs, strengths and weaknesses. From that point we work as a team to tackle their weak points based upon an instructional plan that I have formed with my gathered information about the student.