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As a recent graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, I've seen my fair share of classrooms from all perspectives. From the 8th grade days of tutoring 7th grade students to the years spent as personal tutor to students with academic anxiety and the summers spent teaching theatre to reluctant middle school boys, I've learned that the only thing predictable when moving from subject to subject and from student to student is unpredictability. And that, of course, is why I'm here. I'm here as a tutor who understands that no student is standardized, even if the tests are. I'm here as a teacher who knows that what we're learning may affect today, but how we're learning will affect tomorrow. Most importantly, however, I'm here as a student who knows that academics make up maybe half a whole person. I address the whole person. I address the who - whether they be found on the field, on the stage, in the workforce, or in any other nook and cranny they've deemed "them" - and with that who, we'll tackle together the "what." I'm here for the person, not just the academics, and I look forward to learning from each and every one.

Joanna’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: University of Pennsylvania - Bachelors, English, Magna Cum Laude

Test Scores

ACT English: 34

ACT Reading: 31

ACT Science: 33

SAT Verbal: 770

SAT Writing: 760


I've spent six years in the theatre, playing every role from actress to director to playwright to lighting designer . With this, and another three years involved in the world of film, I'm pursuing a career in film and love to discuss everything from Turner Classic Movies to the Hemsworth brothers. Active NFL fan, hostess of the best Oscar's party in town, chef of my grandmother's best Greek recipes, amateur connoisseur, and fan of long drives in my car, Richard.

Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

Tests may be standardized, but students aren't and never will be. Learning is for the individual, and that means more than simply providing tips for better memorization and regurgitation. It means finding the study methods that best work for the individual, approaching problem areas not as roadblocks but as foundations for marked improvement, and discovering what drives, sparks, and inspires the student. Most importantly, however, it means encouraging the student to strive towards their best self - academically and otherwise - and not the best of another. A 16 oz. glass filled to the brim is no less full than a 24 oz. glass also filled to the brim.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

Address the fears, the personal goals, and most importantly, what drives the student. "At the end of the day, where do you want to have found yourself? Cool, let's get there together." Then, of course, we'll get to work.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

Together, we'll find out the methods that work best for the student - not simply rule out those that don't. More than this, a student is more than just that - they are athlete or performer or employee or son or daughter - and by discovering the spark that drives the individual, we'll learn to apply that proactivity to the classroom.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

Find the "why." "Why are we studying? To what end? What about this subject informs an understanding in another facet of your life that you absolutely love?" Every subject and every problem answers a "why." Leading the student to an answer other than, "because I have to," is the key to finding the motivation.