A photo of Louis, a tutor from University of Minnesota-Duluth

Louis

Certified Tutor

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As a tutor, I believe it is my duty to not only help a student ace their class, but to instill a passion and love for the subject at hand. I truly think that is within the capacity of every pupil to thrive and succeed in their coursework. Everyone has weaknesses. Students, tutors, even the teachers themselves. To identify and eliminate those weakness is to set yourself on a course of success, and ultimately, happiness. Anyone that I take under my wing will get my full, undivided attention, and with a little hard work, they will be on the fast track to a better core understanding of the class material.

Louis’ Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: University of Minnesota-Duluth - Current Undergrad, Physics

Hobbies

Music/Band, Soccer, Anime


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

I believe that any motivated person has the capacity to understand something they never thought they could. It is the job of the tutor/teacher to make the student realize this, and open the door to a world of fascination and never-ending curiosity the student never knew. Not only is this their job, it is their hobby. It is the greatest feeling in the world to see that "light bulb" turn on or that burning passion to learn more develop. I believe that is the single most important thing that keeps educators doing what they do.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

I would first determine where they lie in the spectrum of understanding in their field. That may come from a short quiz, or just a few questions face-to-face. Once I know their strengths and weaknesses, I can start to work on them, turning their strengths into something that compliments their weaknesses, and turning their weaknesses into something they thrive to improve.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

It is important that you teach them to fish, not give them the fish. You can't just force them along the path that you consider righteous. It is important that they learn to ask the questions. It is that inquisitive nature that is the most important in the long run. When they come across something they don't understand, I want them to question it, not to accept it, to engage their teachers and tutors so that those concepts are engraved deep into their mind, so much so that they would be able to teach someone else about it.