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Alexandra

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I am a certified special education teacher in the state of Illinois, and I recently moved home to Minnesota to be close to family. I have five years of experience as a tutor and have worked with children from elementary to high school age. I have three years of experience as a teacher, and I recently completed my MS in education at Johns Hopkins University.

I am a multi-sensory reading instructor with training and experience using Orton-Gillingham Multisensory Reading Strategies and the Wilson Reading System, a reading program designed to teach students with dyslexia how to read. I have experience teaching several subjects, ranging from fifth grade math to eighth grade reading to tenth grade English. I enjoy being a tutor because it allows me to build a connection with a student and help them achieve things they did not think possible.

Alexandra’s Qualifications

Education & Certification

Undergraduate Degree: Oberlin College - Bachelor in Arts, Biology, General

Graduate Degree: Johns Hopkins University - Master of Science, Elementary Education

Test Scores

ACT Composite: 34

ACT English: 34

ACT Math: 32

ACT Reading: 35

ACT Science: 33

Hobbies

Walking my dogs, gardening, reading, watching movies, exercise classes, cooking, baking


Q & A

What is your teaching philosophy?

I believe education should be designed to utilize each student's strengths. Students make greater academic gains when their personal preferences are integrated into skill-building. Additionally, I think of behavior as a very informative type of communication and use behavioral observations to adjust my teaching strategy.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

Discuss expectations with parents and the student, do baseline assessments to get a better idea of the student's academic level, interview the student to find out more about his/her interests, and do academic work together so I can begin to understand the student's academic thought process.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

Independence does not happen overnight. It requires the very gradual build-up of academic confidence and the gradual release of supports.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

I will help my students stay motivated by learning more about their personal interests and integrating them into our academic work. I will also help my students build academic confidence, which will make them more likely to persevere and less likely to give up.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

I will identify the specific part of the concept that is causing confusion, reteach it in a different way, assign practice problems, and ask the student to teach it back to me to ensure he/she has mastered the concept.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

I start by identifying the cause of comprehension difficulties. Reading comprehension problems can be caused by anything, from difficulty blending sounds to having trouble remembering everything from a passage, so I identify the problem and equip my students with strategies to counteract it. Graphic organizers are often helpful for students who struggle with reading comprehension.

What techniques would you use to be sure that a student understands the material?

I would use practice problems, both formative and summative assessments, and have the student teach the material back to me. When a student is able to teach me about the concept, that shows he/she has truly mastered it.