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Julia

I graduated Cum Laude from Kenyon College in 2013, with dual BA degrees in English and Anthropology. Reading is one of my primary passions, and I accordingly focus on tutoring literary comprehension and analysis. I also enjoy assisting students with test prep, essay writing, and cultural anthropology studies.

I began working as a tutor over eight years ago, as a high-school mentor that paired with elementary-aged kids who needed extra help. I continued to pursue this avenue throughout high school and ultimately college, where I became the designated TA for Kenyon's anthropology department, as well as a writing consultant and tutor through our school library and English program. Since my graduation, I have continued to work as a private tutor, providing assistance with everything from study skills to essay editing for students aged 7-17.

I find a special satisfaction in helping those who need a little extra attention in order to become enthusiastic about the learning process. I am the kind of approachable tutor whose zest for storytelling can really help boil down complicated and/or dry subject matter, and I find few things more gratifying than igniting the interest of previously bored students.

In my spare time, I enjoy singing, painting, reading, horseback riding, and jogging, as well as spending time with my pet dog and cat.

Undergraduate Degree:

Kenyon College - Bachelor in Arts, English and Anthropology

ACT Composite: 31

ACT English: 31

ACT Reading: 36

SAT Composite: 2170

SAT Verbal: 800

SAT Writing: 700

Singing, painting, horseback riding, dogs, reading, jogging.

College English

College World History

Comparative Literature

High School English

High School World History

Other

Study Skills

Study Skills and Organization

US History

What is your teaching philosophy?

I believe that teaching is the best way to learn. Accordingly, my tutoring philosophy is to encourage my students to learn alongside me, by exploring and explaining the information through engaged partnership within the material. I love seeing the excitement that students experience when they master their ability to think independently, question the content at hand, and "teach" it right back to me!

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

I begin sessions with new students by asking them to share their starting point with me. Some typical questions are "how comfortable do you feel with this subject?" "What is the hardest part for you about this class" and "what type of assignments make you feel like a rock star?" By learning how the student initially relates to the content they're working on, I can form a plan for the best way to improve strengths, tackle challenges, and improve efficiency and study habits.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

I help students to become independent learners by encouraging them to answer their own questions, while offering guidance along the way. I've found that most students are not nearly as "lost" as they feel when it comes to complex subject matter, and that the Socratic method does wonders when it comes to increasing student confidence and capacity for independent learning.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

I help students stay motivated by offering frequent praise, while continuously utilizing a "circle-back" method for the material. Through refreshing recently learned facts, theories, and notes, students are able to increase their retention rate, while feeling a sense of immediate accomplishment.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

When students have difficulty mastering specific skills or concepts, I take a peripheral approach to the troublesome issue. For example, students who may find concept B difficult to understand in its entirety will be perfectly capable and comfortable exploring the components and related concepts separately (i.e., concepts A and C). I have found that once students realize that they can easily comprehend the surrounding concepts, and can master the skills necessary for tackling the larger idea, they become much less intimidated by the originally difficult concept.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

Students who struggle with reading comprehension are, in my experience, often dealing with issues of attention, self-confidence, and a feeling of ongoing defeat. Many such students have shared with me that they feel the material they're tasked with reading is "pointless", as they don't think they're going to properly register the information from a given passage anyway. I find that "popcorn reading" (trading off reading with a partner), can be very helpful, as it requires the student to stay engaged throughout a passage. In addition to this strategy, I employ frequent "circle-backs", by stopping to ask the student about the previous word, sentence, or paragraph, which keeps things fresh and engaging.