SAT II US History : U.S. Intellectual and Cultural History from 1790 to 1898

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for SAT II US History

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Example Questions

Example Question #11 : U.S. Intellectual And Cultural History From 1790 To 1898

Who invented the telephone?

Possible Answers:

Thomas Edison 

Alexander Graham Bell

Cyrus McCormick 

Eli Whitney

Samuel Morse

Correct answer:

Alexander Graham Bell

Explanation:

The invention of the telephone was an ongoing and convoluted process throughout the mid-nineteenth century; however, popular history and patent law credits Alexander Graham Bell and his assistant Thomas Watson with the invention of the telephone, in 1875. 

Example Question #12 : U.S. Intellectual And Cultural History From 1790 To 1898

Noah Webster supported __________.

Possible Answers:

the education of students towards strong national identity 

the rights of East-Asian immigrants in New York City 

a greater focus on public health 

an outbreak of war with France during the administration of President John Adam

the rights of slave owners in the Kansas territory

Correct answer:

the education of students towards strong national identity 

Explanation:

Noah Webster was an early American lexicographer and educational reformer. Webster wrote extensive textbooks teaching generations of young Americans how to read, write, and spell. He is credited with helping secularize and nationalize the American education process. 

Example Question #13 : U.S. Intellectual And Cultural History From 1790 To 1898

All of the following were reform movements started in the early nineteenth century except __________.

Possible Answers:

women's suffrage

the labor movement

public education

abolitionism

temperance

Correct answer:

the labor movement

Explanation:

The antebellum period saw a wide range of social reform movements develop. Most of these had their roots in the burgeoning evangelical Christianity of the time period. Abolitionism, women's rights and suffrage, public education, and temperance all saw reform societies founded on their behalf. The labor movement did not begin in force until the late nineteenth century and more widespread factory work in America.

Example Question #14 : U.S. Intellectual And Cultural History From 1790 To 1898

The French author Alexis de Tocqueville is best known for the book __________.

Possible Answers:

Uncle Tom's Cabin

The Scarlet Letter

The Last of the Mohicans

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Democracy in America

Correct answer:

Democracy in America

Explanation:

Alexis de Tocqueville was minor French noble who undertook a tour of America in 1831, officially to study the American prison system, but instead analyzed all of American society. In 1835, he published his analysis of American society in his book Democracy in America. De Tocqueville's book is still widely read and considered one of the chief sources on society in Jacksonian America. In particular, de Tocqueville makes many claims about why America can produce a vibrant democracy.

Example Question #15 : U.S. Intellectual And Cultural History From 1790 To 1898

Harriet Beecher Stowe's 1852 novel about the grim reality of slavery is called ____________.

 

 

Possible Answers:

Free at Last!

The Abolitionist

Uncle Tom's Cabin

Silent Spring

The Jungle

Correct answer:

Uncle Tom's Cabin

Explanation:

Abolitionist Harriet Beecher Stowe's 1852 novel is entitled Uncle Tom's Cabin.

Example Question #16 : U.S. Intellectual And Cultural History From 1790 To 1898

In 1845, periodical editor John L. O'Sullivan coined which of the following terms, used to describe the American desire to expand throughout the entire North American continent as providentially destined?

Possible Answers:

Manifest Destiny

Providential Fortune

Effective Call

Emancipation Proclamation

Predestination of the Nation

Correct answer:

Manifest Destiny

Explanation:

In 1845 in his periodical United States Magazine and Democratic Review, John L. O'Sullivan famously wrote that it was America's "manifest destiny" to expand and inhabit the rest of the continent. Manifest Destiny refers to the 19th century U.S. policy of expansion towards the Pacific coast.

Example Question #17 : U.S. Intellectual And Cultural History From 1790 To 1898

The Second Great Awakening profoundly influenced all of the following movements except __________.

Possible Answers:

Fundamentalism

Temperance

Women's Rights

Education Reform

Abolitionism

Correct answer:

Fundamentalism

Explanation:

The Second Great Awakening, a nation-wide religious revival that occurred from roughly 1801 to 1850, had widespread influence beyond just religious measures. Abolitionism, education reform, the women's rights movement, temperance, and prison reform were among the many outgrowths of the Awakening. As compared to later religious movements such as Fundamentalism, the Second Great Awakening promoted action over strict doctrine and theology.

Example Question #18 : U.S. Intellectual And Cultural History From 1790 To 1898

Which prolific author's works, The Souls of Black Folks and Black Reconstruction in America, challenged the prevailing notion that African Americans were responsible for the failures of the Reconstruction era?

Possible Answers:

Booker T. Washington

Richard Wright

W. E. B. Du Bois

Langston Hughes

James Baldwin

Correct answer:

W. E. B. Du Bois

Explanation:

The Souls of Black Folks (1903) and Black Reconstruction in America (1935), which challenged the prevailing notion that African Americans were responsible for the failures of the Reconstruction era, were written by W. E. B. Du Bois, one of the most prominent voices of the African American Civil Rights movement. Racist thinkers of the early twentieth century in America waged a continued campaign to demonize and vilify African Americans, and to scapegoat them for any social or economic failures seen during the Reconstruction Era. Dubois' clear, lucid prose directly and implicitly challenged these racist propaganda talking points.

Example Question #19 : U.S. Intellectual And Cultural History From 1790 To 1898

What was the most significant effect of Plessy v. Ferguson?

Possible Answers:

It established a system of reparations for victims of violence and exploitation during the Civil War.

It established the "three-fifths rule," counting African-Americans as three-fifths of a citizen when measuring the population of an area for legislative and taxation purposes.

It established the "one-drop rule" to determine whether someone was legally considered black under US law.

It inspired the passage of the 23rd Amendment.

Its decision upheld the constitutionality of state laws that enforced racial segregation within public facilities under the doctrine of "separate but equal."

Correct answer:

Its decision upheld the constitutionality of state laws that enforced racial segregation within public facilities under the doctrine of "separate but equal."

Explanation:

Plessy is important because it represents an example of significant legislative gains in racial equality being surreptitiously undermined by judicial mandate. The court in Plessy ruled that the Fourteenth Amendment was not violated when Homer Plessy was expelled from a "whites-only" train car, because so long as there existed "separate, but equal" facilities, there was no violation of equal rights.

Example Question #20 : U.S. Intellectual And Cultural History From 1790 To 1898

Which is an example of "muckraking journalism?"

Possible Answers:

Ida Tarbell's expose of the Standard Oil Company's practices, which brought to light many of the unscrupulous practices and monopolization going on in big industries.

Uptown Sinclair posed as a worker in a Chicago meat packing factor for seven weeks, seeking to investigate and bring to the public eye the struggles of immigrant workers. However, the numerous health risks and disgusting practices he documented ended up being what roused the public's attention instead, and his work directly contributed to the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act.

Nellie Bly pretended to be insane in order to be admitted to the Women’s Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell’s Island and document first-hand the appalling conditions there.

All of these.

Lincoln Steffens' investigation of local government in New York City and subsequent discovery of abundant corruption of politicians by businessmen seeking special privileges.

Correct answer:

All of these.

Explanation:

Each of these writers was referred to as "muckraking journalists." The term muckraker was used in the Progressive Era to characterize reform-minded American journalists who wrote largely for all popular magazines. They relied on their own investigative journalism reporting; muckrakers often worked to expose social ills and corporate and political corruption. Muckrakers represented the beginning of modern investigative journalism and "watchdog" journalism as we still know it today.

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