ISEE Upper Level Verbal : Synonyms: Prefixes from Latin

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for ISEE Upper Level Verbal

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Example Questions

Example Question #51 : Synonyms: Prefixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

CONJUNCTION

Possible Answers:

Union

Density

Collision

Argument

Fault

Correct answer:

Union

Explanation:

The word “conjunction” is comprised of parts meaning “with” and “join,” thus literally meaning “joined with.” The “con-” prefix, meaning “with,” is the same as found in the “com-” in “commune” and likewise is in the Spanish expression often used in English, “chili con carne,” which means “chili with meat.” The “-junction” portion of the word is related to “join,” but likewise is found in the identical word “junction,” which indicates the location of multiple things coming together. The word “conjunction” would be used in a sentence like, “The conjunction of the large paycheck with the significant medical bill was a happy occurrence, unexpectedly allowing Marge to pay for the accident without going into debt.”

Example Question #51 : Synonyms: Prefixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

DIGRESS

Possible Answers:

Excursus

Wonder

Reversion

Amble

Protestation

Correct answer:

Excursus

Explanation:

The word “digression” is related to words like “regress” and “progressive.” It is comprised of two roots, both of which are likely familiar. The prefix “di-” here means “down from” or “away from.” The “-gress” comes from the Latin word for “to step.” The words “grade” and “gradual” both come from this same base, as do the aforementioned words. For example, “progression” is the process of “going forward (pro-).” The word “digression” means, “turning away from the path of an argument or discussion.” Often, we think of someone “digressing” into some topic that is unrelated to the one currently being discussed. Perhaps you have heard someone say, “But I digress.” When he or she says this, he or she means to say, “I acknowledge that I have gone off the topic, stepped away from the train of thought!” An example use of “digression” would be, “In the course of delivering his speech, the professor went off on a long digression to discuss the merits of coconut oil for the development of skin tissue. Nobody was quite sure why he was discussing this in an American literature class.”

Example Question #51 : Synonyms: Prefixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

RELINQUISH

Possible Answers:

Renounce

Overcome

Destroy

Vanish

Reiterate

Correct answer:

Renounce

Explanation:

The word relinquish is composed of the prefix “re-”, which here merely strengthens the sense of the base, and a base meaning “to leave or abandon.” The latter is related to words like “derelict,” “dereliction,” and “reliquary.” To “relinquish” something is to give it up freely. The word “renounce” means “to announce the abandonment of something.”

Example Question #53 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

IMMIGRATE

Possible Answers:

Perambulate

Remain

Travel

Settle

Oppress

Correct answer:

Settle

Explanation:

The word “migrate” is derived from the Latin root word for “to move or transport.” In the case of “immigrate,” the prefix “im-” is a form of “in”; therefore, the word means “to move into.” Immigrants are those persons who leave one area or country in order to settle in another. Among the options given, the only one that matches this general sense is “settle.” “Travel” and “perambulate” do not indicate the notion of “settling down” upon arrival, as would be the case with those who immigrate. Do not confuse this word with “emigrate,” which means “to move out of.” The same person can be an “immigrant” and an “emigrant.” He or she is called an “immigrant” when referring to the nation into which he or she is coming—e.g. “He immigrated into the United States after years of oppression.” The same person is said to “emigrate” with reference to the country that he or she had left—e.g. “He emigrated from his native country because of the dire oppression.”

Example Question #53 : Synonyms: Prefixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

EMIGRATE

Possible Answers:

Settle

Relocate

Travel

Abscond

Sequester

Correct answer:

Relocate

Explanation:

The word “migrate” is derived from the Latin root word for “to move or transport.” In the case of “emigrate,” the prefix “e-” is a form of “ex,” meaning “out of”; therefore, the word means “to move out of.” Emigrants are those persons who leave a country. Among the options given, the only one that matches this general sense is “relocate.” “Travel” does not necessarily signify the idea of leaving a country in order to relocate somewhere else. Do not confuse this word with “immigrate,” which means “to move into.” The same person can be an “immigrant” and an “emigrant.” He or she is called an “immigrant” when referring to the nation into which he or she is coming—e.g. “He immigrated into the United States after years of oppression.” The same person is said to “emigrate” with reference to the country that he or she had left—e.g. “He emigrated from his native country because of the dire oppression.”

Example Question #54 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

PERMEATE

Possible Answers:

Persevere

Fulfill

Remain

Perfuse

Complete

Correct answer:

Perfuse

Explanation:

The word “permeate” is a combination of the prefix “per-”, here used to mean “through,” and the Latin root for “to go or pass.” It means to “go through” in the sense of something that fills a space. For example, one might say, “The smell of the fresh apple pie permeated the room, filling it with the wonderful odors of the autumnal dessert.” The word “perfuse” means “to pour through” in a sense close to that of “permeate.” Its “-fuse” portion is related to the same form that is found in “infuse” and “diffuse.”

Example Question #52 : Synonyms: Prefixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

RESUSCITATE

Possible Answers:

Revive

Concoct

Recall

Conjure

Submerge

Correct answer:

Revive

Explanation:

The word “resuscitate” is derived from Latin roots meaning “to raise up again.” It is from this that we get the general sense of “resuscitate” as meaning “to bring back to life from a near death situation.” The word “revive” best signifies this, as it means “to bring back to life.” The “-vive” in “revive” is related to other words for life such as “vivify” and “survive.”

Example Question #53 : Synonyms: Prefixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

SUBMERGE

Possible Answers:

Combine

Drown

Navigate

Sail

Plunge

Correct answer:

Plunge

Explanation:

The “-merge” portion of this word is related to similar forms found in English words like “emerge” and “immersion.” It is derived from the Latin for “to dip.” The prefix “sub-” means “beneath” or “under,” as is used in the word “submarine” (meaning “beneath water”). When someone “submerges” something else, he or she “dips it under water.” Plunge is the best option among those given.

Example Question #55 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

EMERGE

Possible Answers:

Crisis

Drown

Plunge

Materialize

Coagulate

Correct answer:

Materialize

Explanation:

The “-merge” portion of this word is related to similar forms found in English words like “submerge” and “immersion.” It is derived from the Latin for “to dip.” The prefix “e-” is a form of “ex-”, meaning “out of” as used in the word “exit”—“to go out of.”   When someone or something “emerges” it “comes out of being dipped.” A better definition is “coming into view or becoming apparent.” When something “materializes,” it comes to exist actually. Often, this is used to describe something appearing as well.

Example Question #56 : Using Prefixes, Suffixes, And Roots To Identify Synonyms

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

PERSIST

Possible Answers:

Exasperate

Overcome

Destroy

Persevere

Fill

Correct answer:

Persevere

Explanation:

The prefix “per-” often means “through,” but it likewise can function as an intensifier or as something implying completion. For example, the word “perfect” literally means “thoroughly or completely made.” The word “persist” is derived from this second usage of “per-” and a base derived from the Latin for “to stand.” The latter can be found in words like “resist,” “consist,” and “exist.” Someone who “persists,” stands firm through difficulties. Such a person could be said to persevere, which is nearly a perfect synonym.

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