ISEE Middle Level Verbal : Synonyms: Nouns for Abstract Concepts

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for ISEE Middle Level Verbal

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Example Questions

Example Question #141 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

DEPRIVATION 

Possible Answers:

Theft

Poverty

Exclusivity

Reservation

Robbery

Correct answer:

Poverty

Explanation:

The word "deprivation" describes a particular state of being, namely that of being deprived. Now, "to be deprived" means to have something taken from oneself. For this reason, it is tempting to think that deprivation indicates something related to stealing or robbery. However, it really describes the state of having a lack as a result of any cause. For instance, "sleep deprivation" occurs when someone lacks sleep. Such sleep is unlikely to be described as being "stolen" (at least not literally). Thus, we can say that "deprivation" is a state of poverty—a state of lack. Poverty can refer not only to money but to any lack whatsoever, though we do usually use the word to indicate financial lack. Thus, the best option provided is "poverty."

Example Question #142 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

SINGULARITY

Possible Answers:

Unity

Arrogance

Harmony

Uniqueness

Cheapness

Correct answer:

Uniqueness

Explanation:

Even when you do not know a word, knowing its parts can help a lot! The words "single" and "singular" are likely ones with which you are familiar. Something is "singular" when it is merely one (as opposed to many). A "single french fry" is only one little potato snack! "Singularity" indicates the state of being singular. It describes something that is unique, without another like it. Thus, "singularity" is a synonym for uniqueness. Do not, however, think that it is a synonym for unity. To be "united" is merely to be a single whole (as opposed to a disorganized heap). This does not mean that something is unique.

Example Question #141 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

SPECULATION

Possible Answers:

Financial

Intelligence

Fiscal

Conjecture

Astonishment

Correct answer:

Conjecture

Explanation:

The word "speculation" has a rich, varied history and set of roots. It comes, in general, from the idea of looking at something. (Hence, even the word "spectacles" for eyeglasses is related to the word "speculation.") Now, the particular word "speculation" has taken on the meaning, to think or speak about something without having evidence. For instance, someone might speculate about the cause of a leak on the edge of his or her property. He or she might walk down to the bottom of the yard and see a little stream coming out of the ground. Since he or she really does not know why the leak is occurring, at best he or she can speculate on its cause. The word "speculate" has also taken on another, more particular meaning. It can indicate the kind of "guesswork" done when people invest in the stock market. Thus, such persons (especially when they are just guessing) are called "speculators"—because they don't have firm evidence for their guesses.

"Speculation" (even in the last sense mentioned above) is not immediately equivalent to "financial" or "fiscal." Such speculations are financial speculations; however speculation is not financial in and of itself.

Thus, the best option is "conjecture." This too is a very neat word. It comes from the prefix con-, which means with or together. The -ject portion is the same as found in "eject" and "reject." It means to throw. Thus, things that are "conjectured" are just thrown together.

Example Question #142 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

ACCOLADE

Possible Answers:

Idea

Instrument

Punishment

Fear

Award

Correct answer:

Award

Explanation:

An "accolade" is a noun used to describe an honor, tribute, or award. An "idea" that results in a discovery or invention might garner someone an "accolade," like the Nobel Prize, but is not directly synonymous. "Punishment" is an antonym to "accolade."

Example Question #143 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

EXCESS

Possible Answers:

Surplus

Relate

Delete

Halt

Outside

Correct answer:

Surplus

Explanation:

"Excess" is a noun describing an overabundance of something. The correct synonym is therefore "surplus," which also means an overabundance of a resource or trait.

Example Question #144 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the word or phrase whose meaning is closest to the word in capital letters.

PREDICAMENT

Possible Answers:

Contrasting

Difficult situation

Forecast

Thorough

Well-rounded

Correct answer:

Difficult situation

Explanation:

A "predicament" describes a difficult situation. For example: "We faced a PREDICAMENT after learning that we had more people than places at the table."

As a noun a "forecast" is a prediction. "Contrasting" is a verb describing the act of comparing the differences between two things. "Thorough" is an adjective describing something that is rigorous or complete

Example Question #145 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the word or phrase whose meaning is closest to the word in capital letters.

ADVERSITY

Possible Answers:

Excessive speech

Contrary

Hardship

Simple solution

Horror

Correct answer:

Hardship

Explanation:

"Adversity" is a noun describing hardship or difficulty. For example: "We all face ADVERSITY at some point in our lives, but it is how we respond that defines us."

None of the other answers are particularly related to "adversity."

Example Question #146 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the word or phrase whose meaning is closest to the word in capital letters.

VALOR

Possible Answers:

All-encompassing

Utopia

Bitterness

Courage

Peace

Correct answer:

Courage

Explanation:

"Valor" is an abstract noun describing courage. For example: "The rescuer displayed an act of VALOR when he jumped in front of a moving vehicle to save the dog."

"Peace" is an abstract noun describing a state of calm or the absence of violence. "Bitterness" is an abstract noun used to describe the property of bad feelings or a specific taste sensation. A "utopia" is an idealized place or society.

Example Question #147 : Synonyms: Nouns For Abstract Concepts

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

RENOWN

Possible Answers:

Fame

Abasement

Contempt

Wealth

Disgust

Correct answer:

Fame

Explanation:

A person of great "renown" is someone well-known for something. An actor or singer is "renowned" for their talent. This is the same thing as "fame." While "wealth" often accompanies "fame" or "renown," this is not always the case, it is very possible to be renowned without having any money at all, just ask any poet!

Example Question #218 : Synonyms: Nouns

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

CONSUMERISM

Possible Answers:

Socialism

Excess

Abundance

Illness

Consumption

Correct answer:

Consumption

Explanation:

"Consumerism" is the belief that the abundant purchase of goods is an act of personal value. If you pay attention to both "abundance" and "excess" in the answer choices, you will notice that they are close in meaning to one another, and that they both describe what is often a consequence or result from consumerism, but are not directly synonymous with consumerism. The action that is best captured by the idea of consumerism is, however, consumption, the correct answer. The other options are not close in meaning to consumerism, so you may therefore eliminate them. This is a tricky question, since it might intially appear that there is more than one answer. By pairing words in answer choices (when two words in the answers are very similar to each other), you may come closer to elminating them as well.

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