ISEE Middle Level Verbal : Synonyms: Adjectives Describing Quality, Quantity, and Variety

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for ISEE Middle Level Verbal

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Example Questions

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Example Question #51 : Synonyms: Adjectives Describing Quality, Quantity, And Variety

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

INSPIRING

Possible Answers:

Popular

Courageous

Patriotic

Stimulating

Academic

Correct answer:

Stimulating

Explanation:

Whenever something is "inspiring," it leads others to want to do or feel something. For example, an inspiring song may make people feel like they can overcome any difficulty. An inspiring speech can make someone think that he or she is able to achieve any goal. Sometimes, something can inspire negative feelings as well—as when something "inspires fear." In all of these cases, the inspiration stimulates a feeling or ideal. Thus, something that is called "inspiring" can also be called "stimulating."

Example Question #52 : Synonyms: Adjectives Describing Quality, Quantity, And Variety

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

DESPICABLE

Possible Answers:

Dislikable

Distasteful

Forgetful

Criminal

Abhorrent

Correct answer:

Abhorrent

Explanation:

When ever someone or something is "despicable," it is something that you should despise. That is, it is something that you should hate very strongly. Now, the word "despicable" itself means this—deserving of great hatred. It might well be true that "criminal" things deserve great hatred; however, "criminal" is not synonymous with the basic meaning of "despicable." Therefore, the best option is "abhorrent." Something that is "abhorrent" is hated greatly. It causes a kind of "horror"—not in fright but, instead, in hatred. It is related to the verb "abhor," meaning to hate or find disgusting.

Example Question #51 : Synonyms: Adjectives Describing Quality, Quantity, And Variety

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

ATTRACTIVE

Possible Answers:

Tempting

Luminous

Rare

Favored

Shimmering

Correct answer:

Tempting

Explanation:

Whenever something or someone is "attractive," that thing (or person) draws your attention. An "attraction" is a kind of "pulling" that draws something closer. Sometimes, we use the word "attractive" to mean that something is tempting. For instance, consider the sentence, "That option was particularly attractive, and it was hard for Peter not to choose it." This means that the option was tempting for Peter.

Example Question #52 : Synonyms: Adjectives Describing Quality, Quantity, And Variety

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

INTRICATE

Possible Answers:

Strenuous

Encouraging

Awkward

Exasperating

Ornate

Correct answer:

Ornate

Explanation:

Whenever something is "intricate," that thing is complicated. This can refer to an intricate gadget—something that has many complicated parts that are all related together in complicated ways. It can also refer to something like an intricate argument—that is, one that has many details that require a lot of thinking to understand.

Example Question #55 : Synonyms: Adjectives Describing Quality, Quantity, And Variety

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

DISTINGUISHED

Possible Answers:

Loving

Perceptive

Gashed

Prominent

Insightful

Correct answer:

Prominent

Explanation:

The meaning of the word "distinguished" is related to the verb "to distinguish." Whenever we distinguish two things from each other, we express what is different about them. Each thing is unique and, hence, distinct. Whenever we describe a person as "distinguished," we are saying that he or she is different from other people. You can think of it like meaning that he or she "stands apart" from those others. Sometimes, senators will refer to each other by titles like, "The distinguished senator from Iowa," or "The distinguished woman from Kentucky." A prominent person is someone who is important and separated from the rest of "regular" people. Hence, "prominent" is a good synonym for "distinguished."

Example Question #53 : Synonyms: Adjectives Describing Quality, Quantity, And Variety

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

ESTEEMED

Possible Answers:

Admired

Persuasive

Entangled

Significant

Healthy

Correct answer:

Admired

Explanation:

When we talk about "self esteem," we are referring to the sense of self-worth that a person has about himself or herself. To "esteem" something is to hold that thing in high regard. Thus, an "esteemed" thing is something that is admired by others (and perhaps, if it is a person, by himself or herself as well).

Example Question #2421 : Isee Middle Level (Grades 7 8) Verbal Reasoning

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

DEFECTIVE

Possible Answers:

Reducing

Essential

Protective

Faulty

Diminishing

Correct answer:

Faulty

Explanation:

When something is "defective," it does not function as it should. Therefore, a computer keyboard that doesn't have all of its keys could be called "defective," and we could also call a car with a broken engine "defective." Something that is "faulty" is something with problems like this. The word "faulty" does not have to do with personal faults but with general problems or "faults," as when something does not function properly.

Example Question #58 : Synonyms: Adjectives Describing Quality, Quantity, And Variety

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

UNBLEMISHED

Possible Answers:

Perceptive

Brilliant

Visible

Clear

Immaculate

Correct answer:

Immaculate

Explanation:

A blemish is a kind of ugly mark on something, as when someone has a pimple on his or her skin.  Indeed, we will sometimes call such pimples "blemishes." Whenever something is said to be "unblemished" it is like someone who has no imperfection on his or her skin. He or she is perfect—at least as regards the skin. In general, "unblemished" can mean "perfect" or "without any imperfection." The word "immaculate" means just this. The root "-maculate," means "blemished." The "im-" prefix is the not prefix. Hence, "immaculate" means not blemished.

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