AP World History : Socioeconomic Classes

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for AP World History

varsity tutors app store varsity tutors android store

Example Questions

Example Question #2 : Socioeconomic Classes 1750 To 1900

The Industrial Revolution saw the rise of a new idea. This was that a person could work hard, save money, and move up the social ladder. What was this belief called?

Possible Answers:

Social mobility

Social climbing

The American Dream

Vertical mobility

Correct answer:

Social mobility

Explanation:

The idea that one could change their circumstances was called social mobility. This meant that a person who worked hard and saved money could save enough to advance up in class from a lower class to a higher one. At the time very few people made the transition from lower to upper class though. This was often due to the very poor wages paid by most of the factories at the time, which kept the workers just barely above the poverty line.

Example Question #5 : Socioeconomic Classes 1750 To 1900

The industrial revolution led to major changes in western social structures, which of the following was not one of these changes? 

Possible Answers:

The growth of secondary schools, and public education

The emergence of a highly influential middle class

The evolution of a social gospel that encouraged believers to engage in social charity

The development of the cult of domesticity idealizing the role of women as housekeeper

Ethical objections to new scientific thinking and accompanying legal structures to restrict scientific experimentation

Correct answer:

Ethical objections to new scientific thinking and accompanying legal structures to restrict scientific experimentation

Explanation:

While the industrial revolution led to strict temperance and strong moral values, none of them opposed scientific discovery. In fact, new advances in science and technology were one of the greatest achievements of the era. Without new technology there would be no industrial revolution. 

Example Question #6 : Socioeconomic Classes 1750 To 1900

The Reform Bill of 1832 __________.

Possible Answers:

Extended voting rights to the British middle class 

Allowed for universal manhood suffrage in Britain

Reinstated freedom of the press in Russia

Abolished serfdom in Russia

Reinstated the monarchy in France 

Correct answer:

Extended voting rights to the British middle class 

Explanation:

The Reform Bill of 1832 was passed in the British parliament to “amend the representation of the people of England and Wales.” Prior to the Reform Bill, only a very small percentage of the population was able to vote, roughly five hundred thousand out of a population of thirteen million. The Reform Bill extended voting rights to an additional few hundred thousand men from the emerging industrial middle class. Although the percentage of the British population who could participate in government was still lower than ten percent, the Reform Bill represents the first step in Britain towards truly representative democracy.

Example Question #7 : Socioeconomic Classes 1750 To 1900

Karl Marx and Freidrich Engles are credited with formulating what political theory? 

Possible Answers:

Scientific Socialism

Anarchism

Social Nationalism

Capitalism

Democracy

Correct answer:

Scientific Socialism

Explanation:

Marx and Engels are credited with fully theorizing the process of a nation moving toward what they called Scientific Socialism. This theory stood in opposition to capitalism (which was formulated by Adam Smith) and focuses on the power of the masses and especially the working class. Additionally, their theory sought to reduce economic uncertainty, provide an adequate amount of goods for every citizen, and reduce inequality in society. 

Example Question #8 : Socioeconomic Classes 1750 To 1900

During the Mexican Revolution, Emiliano Zapata campaigned for ______________.

Possible Answers:

land reforms and improving the rights of the Mexican peasantry

economic reforms and the rights of the Mexican middle class

industrialization and modernization of the Mexican military

opening Mexican markets to foreign companies

closing Mexican borders to immigrants from Europe and North America

Correct answer:

land reforms and improving the rights of the Mexican peasantry

Explanation:

Emiliano Zapata campaigned extensively for land reforms and improving the rights of the Mexican peasantry. Zapata lived in southern Mexico where almost all of the land was owned by small landowning elites who monopolized control of land and water. Zapata wanted to reform this situation and improve the access to land and water for Mexico’s peasant population.

Example Question #9 : Socioeconomic Classes 1750 To 1900

Which social group of Revolutionary-era French society were known as “émigrés?”

Possible Answers:

Catholic clergy

Exiled aristocrats

Anti-monarchy nobles

peasants from the countryside

Urban guild workers

Correct answer:

Exiled aristocrats

Explanation:

In the chaos and tumult of Revolutionary-era France, social status and class distinctions were constantly in flux. A new sub-class, known as emigres, emerged. These emigres were aristocrats who were especially loyal to the King and the entire royal family. Fearing that political conditions in their home country were about to take a perilous turn, the emigres fled France to start new lives in neighboring countries. In total, about sixteen thousand emigres departed France over the course of the decade between 1789 and 1799. However, they had no intentions of abandoning their beloved monarchy to the revolutionary forces; from their self-imposed exile, many emigres sponsored anti-revolutionary campaigns, plots, and disturbances back in France. The most consequential émigré was King Louis XVI’s younger brother, the count of Artois, who fled the country in 1791 and then orchestrated his older brother’s unsuccessful escape attempt from Paris later that same year.

Example Question #2 : Socioeconomic Classes 1750 To 1900

During the Tokugawa Shogunate what happened to the status of Daimyos?

Possible Answers:

It declined dramatically as Daimyos were forced to serve in the imperial army

It declined slightly as Daimyos were forbidden from entering the Japanese court

It declined significantly as land was taken from powerful Daimyos and redistributed according to the Shogun’s wishes

It increased significantly as Daimyos were excluded from military service and given other special privileges within society

It increased significantly as Daimyos were given land previously held by the emperor

Correct answer:

It declined significantly as land was taken from powerful Daimyos and redistributed according to the Shogun’s wishes

Explanation:

Prior to the Tokugawa Shogunate and the unification of Japan, Daimyos had been powerful feudal landowners and rulers in Japanese society. However, during the Tokugawa Shogunate the power of the Daimyos declined significantly as the rulers of Japan consolidated their power. The land, which had been held by the Daimyos for centuries, was redistributed and with the loss of their land the Daimyos also lost most of their power.

Example Question #41 : Socioeconomic Classes

In the Indian caste system what is a jati?

Possible Answers:

An individual who is declared untouchable and is at the very bottom of Indian hierarchy

A subcaste that represents an individual's religious affiliation

A subcaste that represents an individual’s occupation

An opportunity to improve one’s standing within the caste system

The process of reincarnation that determines which caste an individual will be reincarnated into

Correct answer:

A subcaste that represents an individual’s occupation

Explanation:

In the Indian caste system a jati is a subcaste, such as “fisherman” or “rice farmer.” A person’s jati generally reflects, or determines, their occupation. In modern Indian society the privileges and roles of jatis are extremely complicated and the cause of much controversy.

Example Question #42 : Socioeconomic Classes

Which of the following represents the correct order of the Indian caste system (starting from the most esteemed)?

Possible Answers:

Rulers and warriors; priests; peasants and serfs; merchants and artists; untouchables

Rulers and warriors; merchants and artists; priests; peasants and serfs; untouchables

Priests; rulers and warriors; merchants and artists; peasants and serfs; untouchables

Rulers and warriors; priests; merchants and artists; untouchables; peasants and serfs

Priests; merchants and artists; rulers and warriors; peasants and serfs; untouchables

Correct answer:

Priests; rulers and warriors; merchants and artists; peasants and serfs; untouchables

Explanation:

The Indian caste system is a system of social hierarchy that has prevailed, in varying degrees of adherence, since the arrival of the Aryans on the subcontinent in 1,500 BCE. In the traditional caste system priests are at the top (called Brahmins); followed by rulers and warriors (called Kshatriya); followed by merchants and artisans (called Vaishyas); followed by peasants and serfs (called Shudras); and finally the untouchables (called Dalits).

Example Question #43 : Socioeconomic Classes

Select the only social and/or economic class permitted to vote under the 1791 French Constitution.

Possible Answers:

active citizens 

non-hereditary nobles 

members of the Third Estate 

large-scale property owners 

male city-dwellers 

Correct answer:

active citizens 

Explanation:

In 1791, the French National Constituent Assembly drafted and passed a new Constitution. The document, which reaffirmed its earlier counterpart, the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen, officially structured France as a constitutional monarchy, with the Assembly as the primary governmental power base. Voting rights were reapportioned based on a new system of classification: active citizens versus passive citizens. Any men who could afford to pay a tax equivalent to three days’ worth of labor were classified as active citizens. Only active citizens were permitted to vote; all other non-qualifying individuals were not eligible voters. At first glance, this change does not seem to be a radical departure from France’s past, but it did widen the voting base by permitting non-noble (but still wealthy) men to vote for the first time.

Learning Tools by Varsity Tutors