AP European History : Treaties; Diplomacy; International Organizations

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for AP European History

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Example Questions

Example Question #514 : Ap European History

Which of these can best be understood as a precursor to the formation of the European Union?

Possible Answers:

The European Coal and Steel Community

The European Atomic Energy Community

The Unification of Germany

The Congress of Vienna

The Treaty of Versailles

Correct answer:

The European Coal and Steel Community

Explanation:

After World War Two, the governments of France and West Germany wanted to integrate their economies so heavily that a future war would not only be impractical, but an economic impossibility. To this end, they integrated their coal and steel production communities under one umbrella organization. The original treaty was signed in 1951 by six countries: West Germany, France, Belgium, Italy, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg. It can be understood as the first step in the transnationalism that later led to the creation of the European Union.

Example Question #515 : Ap European History

Which of the following was not a subject of concern at the 1815 Congress of Vienna?

Possible Answers:

A guarantee of neutrality for Switzerland.

The overthrow of King Charles X, the Bourbon monarch of France.

The borders of Russia and Prussia.

Punishment of France for the aggressive wars it began under Napoleon.

The general balance of power in Europe.

Correct answer:

The overthrow of King Charles X, the Bourbon monarch of France.

Explanation:

The Congress of Vienna involved the shifting of Russian and Prussian borders, the confiscation of French territory gained after 1789, a guarantee of neutrality for Switzerland, and the general balance of power in Europe. King Charles X of France was not overthrown until the July Revolution of 1830.

Example Question #516 : Ap European History

The 1923 Treaty of Lausanne resulted in which of the following?

Possible Answers:

The recognition of the Republic of Turkey as a sovereign nation.

A final resolution to the Crimean War.

The end of the German occupation of France.

The transfer of all Ottoman territory to the new Turkish state.

Economic sanctions against the Ottoman Empire.

Correct answer:

The recognition of the Republic of Turkey as a sovereign nation.

Explanation:

The Treaty of Lausanne, signed in 1923 in Switzerland, ended the conflict between the Ottoman Empire and the World War I Allies. The Turks ceded much of the Ottoman Empire's territory in exchange for the Allies recognition of Turkey as a sovereign republic.

Example Question #517 : Ap European History

Which of the following was not a condition of the Treaty of Versailles?

Possible Answers:

Acknowledgment of Germany’s guilt for the preceding war

The concession of much of Silesia to Congress Poland

The acceptance of permanent Allied garrisons

Germany’s disarmament

The loss of the German colonies

Correct answer:

The acceptance of permanent Allied garrisons

Explanation:

Germany lost Silesia, its colonies, its legal right to a substantial military, and was forced to sign the War Guilt clause of the Treaty of Versailles, which resulted in the discrediting of the German political left. While no Allied garrisons were established, France and Belgium would later occupy the Ruhr valley in 1923 to extract reparations.

Example Question #518 : Ap European History

Which of the following countries did not see territorial gains at the Congress of Vienna?

Possible Answers:

Britain

Prussia

Belgium

Russia

Austria

Correct answer:

Belgium

Explanation:

Austria regained the Tyrol, Salzburg, the Illyrian Provinces and Lombardy-Venetia, among other territories. Prussia gained Westphalia, Danzig, and much of Saxony, while dividing the Duchy of Warsaw with Russia, which also was allowed to keep Finland. Britain was confirmed in control of the Cape Colony. Each of these countries was a major power during the Napoleonic Wars and a victor in the War of the Seventh Coalition which defeated Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815. Belgium, however, was retained in the Kingdom of the Netherlands and did not gain its independence until 1830.

Example Question #519 : Ap European History

Which of the following leaders advocated strongly for the League of Nations after World War I?

Possible Answers:

Joseph Stalin

Charles Dawes

Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Woodrow Wilson

Winston Churchill 

Correct answer:

Woodrow Wilson

Explanation:

Woodrow Wilson saw the United States through World War I and during that time he developed his famous “Fourteen Points.” These were things that he wanted to see accomplished when the war was over that he felt would bring about peace. Wilson believed that it was critical to establish an international organization of countries to foster greater dialogue and cooperation. Wilson believed that this organization would be key to preventing future wars and conflicts. While the League of Nations was established, the United States was never a member as the Senate refused to ratify the treaty. The lack of the United States contributed to the League of Nation’s lack of effectiveness. It was eventually replaced by the United Nations.

Example Question #520 : Ap European History

What ended the Russo-Japanese War?

Possible Answers:

The Kyoto Protocol 

The Treaty of Stalingrad

None of these answers is accurate.

The Peace of Seoul 

The Treaty of Portsmouth

Correct answer:

The Treaty of Portsmouth

Explanation:

The Treaty of Portsmouth ended that Russo-Japanese War, which lasted from 1904 until 1905 and was fought over Russia’s expansion into East Asia. The established Russian Empire was picked to win the conflict, but Japan surprisingly found military success and fought well against the Russians. This conflict was Japan’s entrance onto the world stage and established the nation as a future world power. This conflict was very unpopular in Russia and contributed to the frustration of the Russian people with the Tsar. President Theodore Roosevelt helped bring about a peace agreement by working with Japan and Russia and getting their diplomats to meet in Portsmouth, New Hampshire to settle the conflict. Roosevelt won the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts in bringing about this treaty.

Example Question #21 : Treaties; Diplomacy; International Organizations

The Peace of Westphalia of 1648 marked the conclusion of which conflict?

Possible Answers:

The Huguenot Wars

The Thirty Years War

The English Civil War

The Seven Years War

The War of the Spanish Succession

Correct answer:

The Thirty Years War

Explanation:

The Peace of Westphalia concluded the Thirty Years War, ending conflict among most of the major European states as well as many kingdoms of the Hapsburg Empire. 

Example Question #22 : Treaties; Diplomacy; International Organizations

Which of the following principles was not among Woodrow Wilson's 14-point plan at the Peace of Paris after World War I?

Possible Answers:

The establishment of the League of Nations

Freedom of the seas

The restoration of Belgian sovereignty

The Marshall Plan proposal

Freedom of national self-determination

Correct answer:

The Marshall Plan proposal

Explanation:

President Woodrow Wilson's 14-point plan, which he presented to the assembled statesmen at the Peace of Paris following World War I, included such points as freedom of the seas, freedom of national self-determination, the guarantee of Belgian sovereignty, and a proposal for the League of Nations. It did not, however, include a proposal for the Marshall Plan, which came in the aftermath of World War II.

Example Question #23 : Treaties; Diplomacy; International Organizations

The League of Nations __________.

Possible Answers:

failed in its charge to keep a global peace

was originally conceived by Winston Churchill

was the same thing as NATO

succeeded in its charge to keep a global peace

emerged in the wake of World War II

Correct answer:

failed in its charge to keep a global peace

Explanation:

The League of Nations, conceived as part of Woodrow Wilson's 14-point plan, was partly intended to prevent global scale violence from breaking out again. It failed in this duty, given the rising tensions of the interwar period and, finally, the outbreak of global war again in 1939.

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