3rd Grade Science : Question cause/effect relationships of electricity

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for 3rd Grade Science

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Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Relationships With Electric And Magnetic Interactions

When you rub a balloon on your hair, it creates static electricity. What happens to your hair when you take the balloon off of your head?

Possible Answers:

Your hair is not affected by the balloon when it isn't touching your head.

Your hair sticks out in the direction of the balloon when it isn't touching your head.

Your hair is repelled by the balloon when it isn't touching your head.

Your hair looks greasy and dirty after the balloon is removed from your head.

Correct answer:

Your hair sticks out in the direction of the balloon when it isn't touching your head.

Explanation:

When static electricity is created between a balloon and your hair, your hair is attracted to the balloon. If you simply let go of the balloon, it will stay on your head! If you take the balloon off your head, your hair will follow the direction of the balloon and stick straight out.

Example Question #2 : Relationships With Electric And Magnetic Interactions

Lightning is an example of static electricity. The clouds in the sky are both positively and negatively charged, creating a bolt of energy. What is true about the clouds that produce lightning?

Possible Answers:

The clouds must not be raining to create lightning.

The clouds have to be touching to create lightning.

The clouds do not have to be touching to create lightning.

The clouds must be raining to create lightning.

Correct answer:

The clouds do not have to be touching to create lightning.

Explanation:

If one cloud is positively charged and one is negatively charged, lightning can be created even if there is a gap between the clouds. The particles are active enough to generate electricity through lightning, even if there is no contact between the positive and negative clouds. For lightning to be created, it does not matter if it is raining or not. It also does not matter if the clouds are touching. This is also true of oppositely charged objects on a smaller scale, like hair sticking to a balloon.

Example Question #3 : Relationships With Electric And Magnetic Interactions

Every time I take clothes out of the dryer, they are all stuck together. My socks are attached to my shirts, and when I pull them apart, I hear a crackling noise.

What is causing this to happen?

Possible Answers:

Radio waves

Sound waves

Static electricity

Magnetism

Correct answer:

Static electricity

Explanation:

The reason this happens is because of static electricity. In the dryer, different fabrics rub together, the electrons from a cotton sock may rub off onto a polyester shirt. That's why clothes sometimes stick together and make sparks when you pull them apart.

Example Question #4 : Relationships With Electric And Magnetic Interactions

When discussing electric charges it is true that opposites _________.

Possible Answers:

do nothing

jump

attract

repel

Correct answer:

attract

Explanation:

Negative electrons and positive protons are opposite charges and are attracted to each other. An example would be if a balloon has the opposite charge as someone's hair, and they are held near each other. The hair will stand up and stretch out towards the balloon because the opposite charges are attracted to each other.

Example Question #5 : Relationships With Electric And Magnetic Interactions

Cheri scoots her feet across the carpet while she is wearing cotton socks. She generates a negative charge and reaches to touch the positively charged doorknob. Static electricity is formed.

What will happen when she touches the doorknob?

Possible Answers:

She will not be shocked because of the opposite charges.

Nothing will happen; it is just a doorknob that she is touching.

She will be shocked because of the opposite charges.

She will be shocked because of similar charges.

Correct answer:

She will be shocked because of the opposite charges.

Explanation:

When someone rubs their feet across the carpet, there is a build-up of static electricity. Your feet are rubbing negatively charged electrons off of the floor, and it leaves you with a slightly negative charge. When you reach the positively charged knob, the electrons jump and cause the static shock that you feel on your fingertips. The opposite charges are attracted to each other.

Example Question #6 : Relationships With Electric And Magnetic Interactions

Mr. Figueroa's class is exploring the cause and effect relationships of electricity. He asks the class to think about a balloon being rubbed on someone's hair and then held up to small bits of paper.

Which of the following is true regarding the static electricity between the paper and the balloon?

Possible Answers:

The two objects can have the same electric charge and still be attracted.

The two objects can be separated and still attracted to each other.

The two objects must be different colors to have an electric pull.

The two objects must be touching each other to be attracted.

Correct answer:

The two objects can be separated and still attracted to each other.

Explanation:

Mr. Figueroa is providing an example of how two objects do not need to be touching for there to be an attraction. The static electricity generated by rubbing the balloon on someone's hair is the opposite charge as the charge on the paper. When the paper and balloon come near each other (not touching), the different charges are attracted to each other, and the balloon will cause the paper to "jump" or move.

 

Example Question #7 : Relationships With Electric And Magnetic Interactions

When you rub a balloon on your hair, it creates static electricity. What happens when you put the balloon near your hair?

Possible Answers:

Your hair is repelled by the balloon and lays flat.

Your hair is repelled by the balloon and stands up.

Your hair is attracted to the balloon and stands up.

Your hair is attracted to the balloon and lays flat.

Correct answer:

Your hair is attracted to the balloon and stands up.

Explanation:

When static electricity is created between a balloon and your hair, your hair is attracted to the balloon. If you rub the balloon on your hair and move it away slowly, your hair will follow the direction of the balloon and stick straight out. Your hair is the opposite charge of the balloon. Opposite charges attract, so the hair and balloon are attracted to each other.

Example Question #8 : Relationships With Electric And Magnetic Interactions

Every time I take clothes out of the dryer, they are all stuck together. My socks are attached to my shirts, and when I pull them apart, I hear a crackling noise.

Why are the socks attracted to each other?

Possible Answers:

They have no charges.

They always want to be with their match.

They have the same charge.

They have opposite charges.

Correct answer:

They have the same charge.

Explanation:

The reason this happens is because of static electricity. In the dryer, different fabrics rub together, the electrons from a cotton sock may rub off onto a polyester shirt. That's why clothes sometimes stick together. They have opposite charges which are attracted to each other.

Example Question #9 : Relationships With Electric And Magnetic Interactions

When similarly charged objects are placed near each other, they will __________ each other.

Possible Answers:

be attracted to

repel

None of the choices are correct.

not effect

Correct answer:

repel

Explanation:

Negative electrons and positive protons are opposite charges and are attracted to each other. An example would be if a balloon has the opposite charge as someone's hair, and they are held near each other. The hair will stand up and stretch out towards the balloon because the opposite charges are attracted to each other. In this example, the two objects have the same charge, so they will repel each other. This can be felt with two magnets; when you try to push two North ends together, you can feel them pushing against each other as they repel.

Example Question #10 : Relationships With Electric And Magnetic Interactions

Lightning is a form of electricity.

Possible Answers:

True

False

Correct answer:

True

Explanation:

Lightning is a form of electricity; it is static electricity. In the sky, if one cloud is positively charged and one is negatively charged, lightning can be created if the clouds are near each other. The particles are active enough to generate electricity through lightning, even if there is no contact between the positive and negative clouds.

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