3rd Grade Science : Apply scientific knowledge about magnets to create a solution

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for 3rd Grade Science

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Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Apply Scientific Knowledge About Magnets To Create A Solution

Brad and Brian must separate a mixture prepared by their teacher. She asks them which items in the container could be removed by using a magnet and why. The things they have are toothpicks, sand, pebbles, marbles, iron filings, paper clips, chocolate chips, broken crayons, and bits of notebook paper.

Which items can they remove with a magnet, and why?

Possible Answers:

Iron filings and paperclips because they are all magnetic

Borken crayons, pebbles, and sand because they are all magnetic

Marbles, iron filings, and bits of notebook paper because they are all magnetic

Pebbles and chocolate chips because they are all magnetic

Correct answer:

Iron filings and paperclips because they are all magnetic

Explanation:

Brad and Brian can use their scientific knowledge of magnets to determine which objects can be removed from the mixture. The items that can be removed have the quality of being magnetic. Bran and Brian can remove the iron filings and paperclips from the mix because they are both metal and magnetic. The other objects are made of materials that would not be attracted to the magnet.

Example Question #11 : Magnets To Solve Problems

Drew has a metal toy car, and he has been asked to steer it through a maze, but he is not allowed to touch it at all. Which object could he select to move the car through the maze without touching it?

Possible Answers:

A magnet

A stick

A piece of tape

A megaphone

Correct answer:

A magnet

Explanation:

This problem can be solved, but it is tricky! Not touching the car is the hardest part because everyone is used to steering them with their hands. Drew could use a magnet to solve this problem because magnets do not need to touch to attract other magnetic items. He could hold the magnet above the car and steer it through the maze.

Example Question #13 : Magnets To Solve Problems

Which item relies on magnetism to solve problems for hikers?

Possible Answers:

Map, Navigation, Hands, Travel, Route

Hiking, Walking, Hiking Shoes

Water, Water Bottle, Drink, Sport

Compass, Direction, Navigation, Travel

Correct answer:

Compass, Direction, Navigation, Travel

Explanation:

These are all items that hikers use, and they solve problems for them while they are out in the woods. The only thing that relies on magnets though, is the compass. A water bottle, hiking boots, and a map are all helpful but do not rely on magnets. A compass works because the magnet responds to Earth's magnetic field. Earth is like a giant magnet that creates a magnetic field. The north end of a compass is drawn to align with Earth's magnetic North Pole. While the hikers move through the woods, the compass' needle moves towards the North end of to help them find their way.

Example Question #311 : 3rd Grade Science

Why are magnets beneficial for solving simple problems dealing with movement?

Possible Answers:

They both attract/pull and repel/push non-magnetic objects.

They cannot attract/pull or repel/push magnetic objects.

Magnets do not help solve simple problems dealing with movement.

They both attract/pull and repel/push magnetic objects.

Correct answer:

They both attract/pull and repel/push magnetic objects.

Explanation:

Magnets seem like they might only be suitable for holding the grocery list on the refrigerator, but they have many uses and can solve simple problems dealing with movement. Magnets can attract/pull and repel/push other magnetic objects creating movement. If something needs to be moved and it has a magnetic quality using a magnet is a simple way to complete the task.

Example Question #15 : Magnets To Solve Problems

Mrs. Addly wants to display her students' work on the metal door for other classes to see. She hangs up the work and uses magnets to keep it in place.

Why does this solution work?

Possible Answers:

This solution will not work. She will need to come up with another plan.

Metal is magnetic, so the magnet will stick to it.

Metal is colorful, so a magnet will stick to it.

This works because the paper is very heavy, and the magnets are incredibly strong.

Correct answer:

Metal is magnetic, so the magnet will stick to it.

Explanation:

This solution works because the metal is magnetic, so a magnet will be attracted to it and stick to it. The paper is light, so a strong magnet is not needed. If the door were made of a material that does not have a magnetic quality, the magnet would not work, and an alternate solution would be required.

Example Question #16 : Magnets To Solve Problems

Mrs. Harley wants to display a large wooden sign on her metal door to welcome students. She finds a small magnet and attempts to hang it up. The sign keeps sliding down the door.

What can Mrs. Harley do to solve this problem?

Possible Answers:

She can cut the sign in half, so it isn't as heavy.

She can use tape or glue instead, since it is sticky.

There is no way to hang a wooden sign on a metal door.

She can get a larger or stronger magnet to support the weight of the sign.

Correct answer:

She can get a larger or stronger magnet to support the weight of the sign.

Explanation:

Mrs. Harley had a good idea to use a magnet to hold the sign up because the metal door has magnetic properties, but the sign is too heavy for the size magnet she selected. Mrs. Harley will need to choose a larger or stronger magnet to hold up the weight of the sign. Wood can be dense and heavy, so it is dragging the magnet down and falling off the door. A stronger magnet will solve this problem.

Example Question #17 : Magnets To Solve Problems

Melissa needs to solve a common problem using magnets for a classroom project. How can she use magnets to solve a common problem?

Possible Answers:

Glue a magnet to a long stick and let the glue dry. Use the stick to grab metal things too high to reach.

Roll up a bag of chips, place a magnet on either side of the roll, and connect them. The bag stays closed, and chips remain fresh.

None of the answer choices are correct.

Attach a magnet to a freezer door and the frame and push the door closed so the magnet touches. Now the door will stay closed.

All of the answer choices are correct.

Correct answer:

All of the answer choices are correct.

Explanation:

Melissa could use any of the solutions for her class project. All of the solutions use a magnet to solve a common problem and are reasonable ideas. Keeping a bag sealed, reaching metal objects up high, and keeping a door closed are all issues a magnet (or two) could solve.

Example Question #18 : Magnets To Solve Problems

Mrs. Allen always loses her glasses.  She doesn't want to wear them on her head or around her neck, and she doesn't always have pockets to put her glasses in. They are made of metal. She has brick walls and a magnetic whiteboard in the classroom. What could she do to keep her glasses handy using a magnet to solve the problem?

Possible Answers:

There is no way to use a magnet to keep her glasses somewhere handy.

Hang her glasses up on the brick wall by attaching the metal arms to a magnet stuck to the wall.

Hang her glasses up on the whiteboard by attaching the metal arms to a magnet stuck to the board.

Carry the glasses around in her hand attached to a magnet, so they don't fall.

Correct answer:

Hang her glasses up on the whiteboard by attaching the metal arms to a magnet stuck to the board.

Explanation:

Mrs. Allen wants to keep her glasses handy but doesn't want to wear them on her neck, head, or in a pocket. Her glasses are made of metal, and she has a magnetic whiteboard so she could use a magnet to attach them. Placing the magnet on the board and then attaching the glasses to the magnet will keep them from getting lost, and they will be in an easy to find place.

Example Question #19 : Magnets To Solve Problems

Gluing magnets onto the sides of salt and pepper shakers, so they don't get separated is a solution to a common problem.

Possible Answers:

True

False

Correct answer:

True

Explanation:

The statement in the question is true. A common problem is something that can often happen and in someone's everyday, ordinary life. Salt and pepper shakers are sold as a set but can easily get separated if someone sets one down and forgets about it rather than putting them back together. If they have magnets attached to the sides of them, they can be stuck together, so they never get separated.

Example Question #1 : Apply Scientific Knowledge About Magnets To Create A Solution

Mindy needs to get iron filings out of a pile of sand, rice, and dirt in science class. The iron filings are tiny and fine so they blend in and disappear with the mixture. What would be the best tool to remove the filings from the sand?

Possible Answers:

Magnet

Microscope

Sifter

Tweezers

Correct answer:

Magnet

Explanation:

Using scientific knowledge about magnets and their capabilities can help solve problems that we face in the real-world. If Mindy needs to remove the iron filings, she can use a magnet to remove them from the sand, dirt, and rice. The sand, dirt, and iron filings would slip through the sifter because they are so tiny, tweezers would not be able to sort the small filings out of the mixture, and a microscope would help Mindy see the iron filings better but would not help her separate them.

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