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Matt

My name is Matt and I'm an Aerospace Engineer. I graduated in 2015 from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. While I was there I also received a math minor, which helps me understand math at a more basic level. In high school I worked as a tutor and enjoyed helping those students. I loved the subjects I studied in college and my hope is to share my knowledge of math and physics with those who need extra help. Above all, I want to spread my knowledge to people who may need it.

Undergraduate Degree:

 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Bachelors, Aerospace Engineering

Playing golf, tennis, and hockey. Also love watching the hawks, bears, sox, and illini!

What is your teaching philosophy?

My philosophy is to build from the ground up. When there's a disconnect, it usually doesn't appear out of nowhere. It's very important to cover the basics and make sure that those are solid, then we can start to resolve issues.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

My first session would try to get a baseline for the studentニ_s abilities. Sometimes using problems to help identify strengths and weaknesses, but also communicating with the student, to make sure they know what their skills are and try to build confidence. Sometimes academic problems are an issue of confidence as much as ability.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

The goal, especially in math and science courses, is to develop problem solving skills. So in addition to learning about theory, I would try to help the student come up with a plan to tackle problems. Once they know good strategies, they can implement them in many academic situations.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

It's important for the student to stay positive. Everybody is good at something academically. When you think you're not good at something it's easy to become disinterested. That's why, for me, identifying strengths is as, if not more, important as identifying weaknesses.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

I like to bring in real-life examples or visualizations. It's a lot easier to grasp a concept when you can picture what's supposed to happen.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

The first step is to encourage the skills they already have and build off of that. If they're taking a class, even if it's just a requirement, they have already shown that they have some of the skills to be successful. It's important to make sure they're aware of that.