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Carlo

I received my B.S. in Pharmaceutical Chemistry from UC Davis in 2013. During this time, I gained knowledge in chemistry both through classes and as an undergraduate researcher. Some of my coursework included Calculus, Physics, Biology, Biochemistry, Organic Chemistry, and Inorganic Chemistry. Since graduating, I have worked as a Laboratory Assistant for the Chemistry Department at UC Davis.

Aside from my education, I have several years of tutoring/teaching experience. I have been tutoring since sophomore year in high school (2005) with a focus in Mathematics and Chemistry. While in college, I worked for the UC Davis Physics Department as an undergraduate teaching assistant in Astronomy. In this position I worked closely with 75+ students per quarter.

Sadly, students often view math and science as difficult and boring subjects. This is usually the result of instructors focusing on memorizing formulas and facts. I like to focus on understanding the why and how rather than memorization. In addition, I find math and science incredibly fascinating subjects. My passion for these subjects shows in my teaching style and, as a result, students become more engaged.

Undergraduate Degree:

 University of California, Davis - Bachelors, Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Running, hiking, swimming, cooking, and chemistry

Astrophysics

College Chemistry

High School Chemistry

Honors Chemistry

What is your teaching philosophy?

There is no "one size fits all" way of teaching. Every student has his or her own learning style, and I make sure to tailor my sessions to each student's specific needs.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

During the first session, I sit down with students and briefly go over what they would like to gain from the tutoring and go over what their strengths and weaknesses are in the subject. We will then go over some practice problems and discussion in which I gauge if they are a visual, auditory, reading/writing, or tactile learner. Once I get a feel for the student's knowledge in the subject and their learning style, we will create a lesson schedule for future sessions.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

I don't like to simply give students the answer to a question. Instead, I ask students questions such as "how do you think we should start the problem?" or "what would happen if...?" By asking questions, students are forced to think and develop their own critical thinking skills.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

Repetition is often used to help students memorize subjects; however, doing the same type of problem over and over is an easy way to lose a student's attention. I like to rotate between types of problems. By moving between concepts, students are less likely to get bored and stay engaged throughout the session.