Get Tutoring Info Now
Info & Prices E-mailed
Display vt

Les

Greetings! I tutor math and physics. I grew up in South Austin and graduated from The University of Texas at Austin in 2012 with a degree in electrical engineering. I have three years of tutoring experience and I've also worked as a leadership camp counselor and spoken at UT on career development. Outside of my day job in tech consulting, my passion is in helping others be successful in their education and careers so they can go on to do great things.

Undergraduate Degree:

 The University of Texas at Austin - Bachelors, Electrical Engineering

Live Music, Ballroom Dance, Cooking, Writing

Homework Support

Other

Study Skills

Study Skills and Organization

Summer

What is your teaching philosophy?

I believe in active learning. After a concept is explained, it's important that the student is able to demonstrate understanding of a concept by re-phrasing it or writing out examples of how to apply the concept. Watching and listening without participating slows down the learning process.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

In a first session with a new student, I like to first talk about educational and career goals at a high level, so I can frame my teaching methods and examples in a way that's relevant to the student's mindset. Then we discuss upcoming assignments and tests and current pain points in the material so we can target our efforts where they are most needed. Finally, we'll begin reviewing the material and completing practice problems according to our targeted strategy.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

I like to make sure the student knows exactly what resources they have available for independent learning. Free online reference materials, example problems, and tutorial videos abound, so there's no reason a student can't continue the learning process in between sessions with a tutor.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

I like to keep students motivated by creating a high-level "project plan" for what it will take to get an A in the class, then actively tracking their progress toward the goal. When a student can see his or her progress with hard numbers and can see a quantifiable finish line in the future, it's much easier to do "just one more" practice problem set.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

When a student is struggling with a concept, I like to break down the concept into its fundamental elements to see which of them is missing from the student's arsenal. Like a house without a solid concrete foundation, sometimes higher-level math concepts can't be grasped without a solid foundation in the concepts that feed into it.

What strategies have you found to be most successful when you start to work with a student?

First we assess goals and weak points in the student's educational progress, then we create a concrete "project plan" for what it will take to achieve the grades the student needs. That way the student gets a feel for exactly how much effort it will take to be successful and can actively track their progress toward the goal. Without a way to track progress, getting an A in a difficult math class can be like running a marathon without a known distance and finish line. I help the student see that with a little dedication, success is within sight.