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La Trisha

In case you are wondering who I am, my name is La Trisha Thompson. I am a full time classroom teacher with a teaching credential and a MA in Education. I have been teaching K-10th grade for the past 12 years. For my undergraduate studies, I attended UCLA and earned a BA in Political Science. Azusa Pacific University provided my graduate education, leading to my teaching credential. I attended private Catholic schools for grades K-12.

I believe that all students can learn when taught correctly. Young people get bored easily, so I use videos and academic internet games in addition to traditional teaching methods to help my students learn. I would like the opportunity to help your child progress in his/her academics.

Here is some personal information about me. I love music, dancing, and relaxing by the pool. As far as movies go, I prefer comedies, because they make me laugh. I have only one child. She is 20 years old and recently obtained a degree from the Art Institute of California. I am vegetarian and have a vegetable garden growing in my backyard. There is something very comforting about eating food that I have grown myself.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,


La Trisha Thompson

Undergraduate Degree:

 University of California, Los Angeles - Bachelors, Political Science

Graduate Degree:

 Azusa Pacific University - Masters, Education

Swimming, yoga/pilates, cooking

What is your teaching philosophy?

Young people are capable of learning when teachers make learning interesting and relevant.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

I would spend the first few minutes getting to know them. Sharing some of my interests and background and encouraging them to do the same, helps to break the ice. I like to begin my lessons with an academic game or hands on activity to increase student motivation.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

I would start with direct instruction and then move to guided practice. As the student builds confidence and skill, I would offer less assistance and have him find the answers on his own.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

Verbal praise and positive feedback to parents.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

I would continue to work with the concept, but teach it differently. Students enjoy technology, so I might use interactive websites and academic internet games to teach the skill.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

I use graphic organizers and highlighters to help them identify textual evidence. I stop frequently to check for understanding.

What strategies have you found to be most successful when you start to work with a student?

Assessing them in the beginning is key. The assessments will help me identify weaknesses and know where to target instruction.

How would you help a student get excited/engaged with a subject that they are struggling in?

It is important to start with the basics and then build. Let's say a student is studying middle school math, but lack the foundational skills that should have been mastered in elementary school. This causes the student to feel overwhelmed and frustrated. I would go back and teach the foundational skills one at a time. When I start at his instructional level, it reduces his anxiety and resistance to the lessons. I would also use academic games to make the learning more fun.

What techniques would you use to be sure that a student understands the material?

Assessment will tell me how he is doing. I grade his work as we go along. If his scores are low, then I go back and teach the subject a different way. Eventually his scores should climb. This will let me know that he understands the material.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

I tell my students that they are all smarter than they think they, and they can learn anything if they try. Instead of trying to teach difficult concepts all at once, I chunk the material into small sections. I start with the easiest and build. I am also quick to review the progress with the student so he can see that he is doing better.

How do you evaluate a student's needs?

Assessments will tell me where the student is weak. Watching the students will also help me determine their mood. Young people's body language will tell you when they are tired, overwhelmed, and ready to move on to something less challenging.