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Sammy

I'm currently finishing up my 4-year Bachelor's Degree at Loyola University Chicago. I will be graduating with a major in Economics, as well as a minor in my Statistics - yes, I like numbers more than any person is supposed to. I also like working with people though, and I am ecstatic about any and all opportunities to help people in their education. My primary experience working in a teaching-like environment includes one year as a camp counselor at leadership program Camp Eagle Ridge, where I spent 6 weeks teaching 4 different weekly seminars on different aspects of being a leader, in addition to running a bunch of my own, fun outdoor events. In terms of tutoring, I spent my first college semester at CircEsteem, teaching different Chicago students math through their "Circus-Based" curriculum. Now I'm happy to bring my knowledge and insight to Varsity Tutors, where I can hopefully be of use to students looking to conquer the terrifying world of numbers. I have the most experience working with children, but am of course happy to work with adults as well. At this time, I am comfortable teach any math through Calculus 1 (AP Calculus), and any Statistics through AP Statistics. If you have questions about that or anything else, please e-mail me at sammydolgin@gmail.com, or feel free to call me at 847-212-3029. Thank you!

Undergraduate Degree:

 Loyola University-Chicago - Bachelors, Economics & Statistics

ACT English: 30

ACT Math: 35

Data Science, Statistical Modeling, Analytics, Investments, Entrepreneurship, Writing, Sports, Psychology, Human Nature, Mental Health, Music, Exercise Science, Card Games, Chess

Business

College Business

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High School Business

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High School English

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

I try to make take concepts slow with a gradual path towards independence. Perhaps I will take the same type of problem, and work through it closely with the student. I may then set up the same type of problem with student but detach myself from the solving of it slightly, and hopefully by the 4th or 5th repetition I can completely leave the problem solving to the student.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

Definitely a lot of positive reinforcement. Almost every student has more capabilities than they realize, and I do my best to highlight when a student exceeds my expectation for them, and tell them what it is they did differently that allowed the answer to come so easily to them - perhaps they took their time, didn't overthink a problem, or applied some new mathematical strategy that we'd previously discussed.

How would you help a student get excited/engaged with a subject that they are struggling in?

I love to relate questions back to the student's interest. This is why I often seek out students with an interest in sports, because sports are so easily transferable to mathematics/statistics, and replacing confusing math terms with familiar terms the student knows from everyday life is far more effective.

What types of materials do you typically use during a tutoring session?

I love to utilize the online platform - the drawing feature, graphing feature, and the ability to collaborate with students back and forth. Aside from that, it's usually just the student's notes and classwork, as well as a calculator.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

I typically try to gauge the tone and style that a student will be most responsive to, and I try to get a feel for how the student feels about the subject. While a foundation for student learning is trying to be built, I would say I'm more focused on my learning about the student in the first session than the student's learning of the subject - which sets up for a highly beneficial long-term approach.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

First and foremost, I try to reinforce that I do not mind the process of helping the student or answering their questions. Students so often worry about judgment from their teachers for not knowing their material, and I find that the most effective way to get them actively asking questions is to reassure them that not knowing how to do something is perfectly okay.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

I don't run into this a lot as a math tutor, but I typically just try to make them feel as normal and comfortable as possible, and casually help them as I see appropriate so as not to make a scene.

What techniques would you use to be sure that a student understands the material?

Creating my own questions, or combining questions with past concepts typically acts as a great way to test comprehension, and the repetition helps build long-term familiarity.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

Positive reinforcement all the way! I do all I can to go at a student's individual pace, and when they impress me for what I understand their skill level to be, I let them know it!

How do you evaluate a student's needs?

Tone of voice, body language, and general questioning is all crucial in figuring what does or doesn't work for a student. Typically, the more 'peer-peer' I get with a student, the more vulnerable they are able to be on their individual needs.