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Justin

As a economics major college student on the verge of entering "the real world" from Brandeis University, learning is mistakenly perceived by many of my peers as nearly finished; however, the learning process is always ongoing and changing. Learning happens every day and it is often unseen or even unknown to many people. My personal philosophy is also my personal philosophy in playing/watching sports: the fundamentals and little things are the big things. Whether it is playing ultimate frisbee, basketball, football, by doing the small things correct and consistently, then we open ourselves to greatness. In addition, being passionate about what is learned and how it is learned, there are so many other opportunities that we cannot even begin to imagine.

Undergraduate Degree:

 Brandeis University - Current Undergrad, Economics

Ultimate Frisbee, Reading, Writing, Literature, Economics, Cooking

Business

College Business

College Economics

College English

College Level American History

High School Business

High School Economics

High School English

High School Level American History

Macroeconomics

What is your teaching philosophy?

The best philosophy is to be a good listener and break down problems into more manageable pieces.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

Start with introductions and try to connect with them on a human level.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

I feel it is best to push students in doing smaller exercises related to their own work.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

I will try to encourage them by doing small activities and keep them engaged in the material.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

Break it down into smaller pieces and work within those pieces to a bigger goal.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

The best way to do it is to read along with the student and encourage them to think of some questions.

What strategies have you found to be most successful when you start to work with a student?

Flashcards and small practice problems are usually the best means to convey my points.

What techniques would you use to be sure that a student understands the material?

Quick testing to ensure that the material is settling in their minds. In addition, I've found flashcards and mini-activities really help comprehension.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

I like to start with the smaller aspects and assure the student that they are capable of doing these problems.

How do you evaluate a student's needs?

I like to talk to them from a personal level to create a common ground for all of us to operate on.

How do you adapt your tutoring to the student's needs?

I see what works best with the student and try to anticipate their own needs.

What types of materials do you typically use during a tutoring session?

The best thing to do is to use some of the student's personal work while creating some other questions on our own.

How would you help a student get excited/engaged with a subject that they are struggling in?

I would let them know that the material is conquerable and that they can do well in it. By doing that, the student can gain more confidence and be more engaged in the material. While not everyone is perfect at everything, the student should know that learning is always a marathon rather than a sprint.