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Greg

I am an individual focused on getting better every day. Whether it is through reading a new book every few months, fitness five days a week, trips to new destinations every year, life is about experience. It is also about giving. After more than 25 years in the corporate world, I want to apply this experience in a personal, individual way, through charity, mentoring and further steps to supporting friends and family. My teaching philosophy through years as a mentor for the individuals who have worked for me is predicated on knowing your subject. This is the grounding for confidence, whether it is approaching a test, writing an essay, answering questions or public speaking. The direction I would bring is a focus on understanding the identified topic, imagine potential questions and express knowledge and associated opinion in convincing fashion. The tutoring process would be based on understanding exactly what the student hopes to accomplish, then identifying the gaps in getting there and the steps needed in achieving the objective and exceeding expectations. Students will have a clear picture of what success looks like, how to get there and, of course, have a bit of fun on the way.

Undergraduate Degree:

 Michigan State University - Bachelors, Journalism, English

Fitness, travel, biographies, old movies, time with friends and family.

10th Grade Reading

10th Grade Writing

11th Grade Reading

11th Grade Writing

Adult Literacy

College English

High School English

High School Writing

What is your teaching philosophy?

To first listen and understand what the student's goals and objectives are, identify the gaps and challenges that are present in achieving these objectives, and then build a program to get there. I have greatly enjoyed mentoring the more than 20 or so individuals who have worked for me in communications and public relations. This mentoring has started with writing, teaching them how to position themselves and our company brand in motivational ways. I think this experience could benefit students looking to advance their skills in reading, writing, essay creation, grammar, etc. Bottom line is I also enjoy interacting with young people, and have had summer interns in my department the last 15 years of my corporate life. I look forward to applying this experience to a new step in formal mentoring for students.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

Ask a number of questions as to what the student would like to learn and achieve. What are his/her areas that he/she would like to get better at? What does success look like?

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

By identifying the specific areas he/she has asked for help in. Getting better at this particular topic and providing training so that the student has mastered that particular area and is ready to move on.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

By keeping the sessions fun. Variety, humor, and clearly recognizing successes.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

Try different ways of improving that skill, possibly beginning with an area of interest of the student and approaching through that "portal."

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

Be able to take it slow, use phonetics; one step at a time.

What strategies have you found to be most successful when you start to work with a student?

To listen first. To truly understand what the areas of focus need to be. Then build a program that sets them on the course to get there.

How would you help a student get excited/engaged with a subject that they are struggling in?

To use different ways of approaching the topic. Finding out areas of interest the student has, such as sports, film, television, books, etc.

What techniques would you use to be sure that a student understands the material?

Ask the student to repeat areas of learning that were the objectives of the lesson.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

By clearly recognizing advancements, congratulating the student on successes, and setting a course of work, then reward.

How do you evaluate a student's needs?

By asking numerous questions in the beginning to understand what the obstacles are toward achieving his/her particular objectives.

How do you adapt your tutoring to the student's needs?

Through the question process, identify not only the areas that need attention, but the ways to get there.

What types of materials do you typically use during a tutoring session?

The school books the student has been assigned (makes clear what expectations are in the student's particular grade), a computer, a pen, paper, a recording device if the course is on public speaking, etc.