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I am a second-year Political Science major and Mathematics minor at Northeastern University. I hail from St. Paul, Minnesota, but last year's winter here was still the worst I have ever seen. I am currently a member of the Northeastern Debate Society and International Relations Council, which includes participation in Model United Nations, and a featured columnist for the Northeastern Political Review, a student magazine. I have also previously participated in Mock Trial, Speech, Knowledge Bowl, Theater, and Band, where I played the alto saxophone. Last year, I volunteered as a tutor for SquashBusters in Boston, and I just started volunteering as an extracurricular teacher for Citizen Schools.

I became a tutor for Varsity because I love being able to guide students towards success. Education is the cornerstone of our nation and our future, and if students are struggling, they absolutely deserve the help that a tutor can give them. I do not believe in teaching directly towards standardized tests; rather, I believe in giving students abilities that they can use not only to get high scores, but to help them develop stronger, more well-rounded skill sets. Things like grammar or writing skills are useful in any field, and I would love to inspire a student who hates math, as I once did, to embrace it and even study it in college. I think that every student has the potential for academic and personal greatness, and I'd be more than happy to help them realize it.

Undergraduate Degree:

 Northeastern University - Current Undergrad, Political Science

ACT Composite: 35

ACT English: 36

ACT Math: 35

ACT Reading: 36

ACT Science: 33

Extracurriculars, writing, reading, surfing the Internet, watching TV

What is your teaching philosophy?

Don't tell students the answer; slowly guide them towards it.

What might you do in a typical first session with a student?

Introductions, get to know them a bit, then give them an assessment to see where they are in the subject, discuss the results, and begin to draw up a plan for the week.

How can you help a student become an independent learner?

Once they grasp a topic, I would encourage them to use their new abilities to help their struggling classmates, as being willing to help those in need is one of the primary qualities of a good leader.

How would you help a student stay motivated?

Frustration isn't fun for anyone. I'd tell them that if they give up, they'll forever have that frustration nagging at them. If they keep at it, however, they can push through the frustration and have the satisfaction of learning a new skill.

If a student has difficulty learning a skill or concept, what would you do?

Let them take a short break. Then, have them come back and try it again looking at it from a different angle.

How do you help students who are struggling with reading comprehension?

Have them go through and highlight what they think are the most important sentences in the reading and go over their answers with them. If they're still not getting it, I would have them pull up one of their own papers and explain to me the way they made their points, which could help them understand the reading better.

What strategies have you found to be most successful when you start to work with a student?

Starting with a basic evaluation of their skills to identify problem areas, then working from there.

How would you help a student get excited/engaged with a subject that they are struggling in?

Find a fun application for it, e.g., if they like sports, try using things like baseball to help them understand math.

What techniques would you use to be sure that a student understands the material?

I'll begin every session with a quick review of last week's topics so I know the student hasn't lost the information they gained.

How do you build a student's confidence in a subject?

By always encouraging them to keep on trying, no matter how much they're struggling. If they need a break from one topic, let them work on an easier topic for a little bit so they build some confidence in themselves.

How do you evaluate a student's needs?

Evaluative tests and discussion.

How do you adapt your tutoring to the student's needs?

If they're a visual learner, use things like diagrams and videos. If they're talkative, let them talk you through every problem.

What types of materials do you typically use during a tutoring session?

Pencil, paper, textbook if necessary.