TOEIC : Details

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for TOEIC

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Example Questions

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Example Question #1 : Details

I was born in the working-class. Early I discovered enthusiasm, ambition, and ideals; and to satisfy these became the problem of my child-life. My environment was crude and rough and raw. I had no outlook, but an uplook rather. My place in society was at the bottom. Here life offered nothing but sordidness and wretchedness, both of the flesh and the spirit; for here flesh and spirit were alike starved and tormented.

Above me towered the colossal edifice of society, and to my mind the only way out was up. Into this edifice I early resolved to climb. … In short, as I accepted the rising of the sun, I accepted that up above me was all that was fine and noble and gracious, all that gave decency and dignity to life, all that made life worth living and that remunerated one for his travail and misery.  

Adapted from "What Life Means to Me" by Jack London (1909)

According to the text, when did the speaker become interested in rising to a higher class?

Possible Answers:

As an adult 

As a teenager

As a child

As a senior-citizen

Correct answer:

As a child

Explanation:

The correct answer is "as a child." We know that he first became interested in rising to a higher class as a child because of the lines "Early I discovered enthusiasm, ambition, and ideals; and to satisfy these became the problem of my child-life." Additionally, the lines "Above me towered the colossal edifice of society, and to my mind the only way out was up. Into this edifice I early resolved to climb" provide insight. Here, the word "early" shows us that he started having these thoughts when he was a young child rather than a teenager, adult, or older man.

Example Question #2 : Details

At the little town of Vevey, in Switzerland, there is a particularly comfortable hotel. There are, indeed, many hotels, for the entertainment of tourists is the business of the place, which, as many travelers will remember, is seated upon the edge of a remarkably blue lake—a lake that it behooves every tourist to visit. The shore of the lake presents an unbroken array of establishments of this order, of every category, from the "grand hotel" of the newest fashion, with a chalk-white front, a hundred balconies, and a dozen flags flying from its roof, to the little Swiss pension of an elder day, with its name inscribed in German-looking lettering upon a pink or yellow wall and an awkward summerhouse in the angle of the garden. One of the hotels at Vevey, however, is famous, even classical, being distinguished from many of its upstart neighbors by an air both of luxury and of maturity. In this region, in the month of June, American travelers are extremely numerous; it may be said, indeed, that Vevey assumes at this period some of the characteristics of an American watering place. There are sights and sounds which evoke a vision, an echo, of Newport and Saratoga. There is a flitting hither and thither of "stylish" young girls, a rustling of muslin flounces, a rattle of dance music in the morning hours, a sound of high-pitched voices at all times. You receive an impression of these things at the excellent inn of the "Trois Couronnes" and are transported in fancy to the Ocean House or to Congress Hall. But at the "Trois Couronnes," it must be added, there are other features that are much at variance with these suggestions: neat German waiters, who look like secretaries of legation; Russian princesses sitting in the garden; little Polish boys walking about held by the hand, with their governors; a view of the sunny crest of the Dent du Midi and the picturesque towers of the Castle of Chillon.

Adapted from "Daisy Miller: A Study" by Henry James, 1879. 

One of the main tourist attractions of Vevey is ___________.

Possible Answers:

a lake

a river 

a waterfall 

an oceanfront

Correct answer:

a lake

Explanation:

The passage states that "the business of the place...." is a "remarkably blue lake—a lake that it behooves every tourist to visit." There is no mention of any other bodies of water. That is why the correct answer is "a lake."

Example Question #3 : Details

I was a wild little girl of seven. Loosely clad in a slip of brown buckskin, and light-footed with a pair of soft moccasins on my feet, I was as free as the wind that blew my hair, and no less spirited than a bounding deer. These were my mother's pride,--my wild freedom and overflowing spirits. She taught me no fear save that of intruding myself upon others. 

Having gone many paces ahead I stopped, panting for breath, and laughing with glee as my mother watched my every movement. I was not wholly conscious of myself, but was more keenly alive to the fire within. It was as if I were the activity, and my hands and feet were only experiments for my spirit to work upon. 

Returning from the river, I tugged beside my mother, with my hand upon the bucket I believed I was carrying. One time, on such a return, I remember a bit of conversation we had. My grown-up cousin, Warca-Ziwin (Sunflower) always went to the river alone for water for her mother. Their wigwam was not far from ours; and I saw her daily going to and from the river. I admired my cousin greatly. So I said: "Mother, when I am tall as my cousin Warca-Ziwin, you shall not have to come for water. I will do it for you."

Adapted from Zitkala Sa's "Impressions of an Indian Childhood" (1900)

Why does the speaker want to retrieve water for her mother some day?

Possible Answers:

She thinks it will give her a chance to socialize with her friends

She needs a job and would like to earn a wage

She sees her older cousin doing it, and feels it is a mark of maturity and responsibility

She knows that her mother is losing her strength, and soon will no longer be able to go to the river

Correct answer:

She sees her older cousin doing it, and feels it is a mark of maturity and responsibility

Explanation:

The correct answer is "She sees her older cousin doing it, and feels it is a mark of maturity and responsibility." We know this based on the lines:  "I saw her daily going to and from the river. I admired my cousin greatly." There is no sign from the passage at the speaker's mother is sick or losing her strength. There is also no mention of socializing or earning money. 

Example Question #4 : Details

I was a wild little girl of seven. Loosely clad in a slip of brown buckskin, and light-footed with a pair of soft moccasins on my feet, I was as free as the wind that blew my hair, and no less spirited than a bounding deer. These were my mother's pride,--my wild freedom and overflowing spirits. She taught me no fear save that of intruding myself upon others. 

Having gone many paces ahead I stopped, panting for breath, and laughing with glee as my mother watched my every movement. I was not wholly conscious of myself, but was more keenly alive to the fire within. It was as if I were the activity, and my hands and feet were only experiments for my spirit to work upon. 

Returning from the river, I tugged beside my mother, with my hand upon the bucket I believed I was carrying. One time, on such a return, I remember a bit of conversation we had. My grown-up cousin, Warca-Ziwin (Sunflower) always went to the river alone for water for her mother. Their wigwam was not far from ours; and I saw her daily going to and from the river. I admired my cousin greatly. So I said: "Mother, when I am tall as my cousin Warca-Ziwin, you shall not have to come for water. I will do it for you."

Adapted from Zitkala Sa's "Impressions of an Indian Childhood" (1900)

How does the mother feel about the speaker's free-spirited nature?

Possible Answers:

She is proud

She is afraid

She is embarrassed

She is indifferent

Correct answer:

She is proud

Explanation:

The correct answer is "she is proud." The passage states, "I was as free as the wind that blew my hair, and no less spirited than a bounding deer. These were my mother's pride,--my wild freedom and overflowing spirits." There is nothing to show that the mother is afraid or embarrassed by the speaker's free-spirit, and indifference contradicts the quotation provided above. 

Example Question #5 : Details

What is an Insect? When we remember that the insects alone comprise four-fifths of the animal kingdom, and that there are upwards of 200,000 living species, it would seem a hopeless task to define what an insect is. But a common plan pervades the structure of them all. The bodies of all insects consist of a succession of rings, or segments, more or less hardened by the deposition of a chemical substance called chitine; these rings are arranged in three groups: the head, the thorax or middle body, and the abdomen or hind body. In the six-footed insects, such as the bee, moth, beetle or dragon fly, four of these rings unite early in embryonic life to form the head; the thorax consists of three, as may be readily seen on slight examination, and the abdomen is composed either of ten or eleven rings. The body, then, seems divided or insected into three regions, whence the name insect.

Adapted from Our Common Insects: A Popular Account of the Insects of our Fields, Forests, Gardens and Houses. By A. S. Packard, Jr. (1873)

What name is given to an insect's middle body?

Possible Answers:

Thorax

Head

Chitine

Abdomen

Correct answer:

Thorax

Explanation:

The correct answer is "thorax." Readers can find this answer in the text in the line "these rings are arranged in three groups: the head, the thorax or middle body, and the abdomen or hind body." The author renamed the thorax, defining it as the middle body in these lines. "Chitine" is a chemical substance and the other choices are different body parts. 

Example Question #6 : Details

      What is an Insect? When we remember that the insects alone comprise four-fifths of the animal kingdom, and that there are upwards of 200,000 living species, it would seem a hopeless task to define what an insect is. But a common plan pervades the structure of them all. The bodies of all insects consist of a succession of rings, or segments, more or less hardened by the deposition of a chemical substance called chitine; these rings are arranged in three groups: the head, the thorax, or middle body, and the abdomen or hind body. In the six-footed insects, such as the bee, moth, beetle or dragon fly, four of these rings unite early in embryonic life to form the head; the thorax consists of three, as may be readily seen on slight examination, and the abdomen is composed either of ten or eleven rings. The body, then, seems divided or insected into three regions, whence the name insect.

Adapted from Our Common Insects: A Popular Account of the Insects of our Fields, Forests, Gardens and Houses. By A. S. Packard, Jr. (1873)

How many feet do beetles have?

Possible Answers:

6

5

10

8

Correct answer:

6

Explanation:

The correct answer is 6. This answer can be found in the line "In the six-footed insects, such as the bee, moth, beetle or dragon fly, four of these rings unite early in embryonic life to form the head." 

Example Question #7 : Details

Science tells us that all objects are made visible to us by means of light; and that white light, by which we see things in what may be called their normal aspect, is composed of all the colors of the solar spectrum, as may be seen in a rainbow; a phenomenon caused, as everybody knows, by the sun's rays being split up into their component parts.

This light travels in straight lines and, striking objects before us, is reflected in all directions. Some of these rays passing through a point situated behind the lenses of the eye, strike the retina. The multiplication of these rays on the retina produces a picture of whatever is before the eye, such as can be seen on the ground glass at the back of a photographer's camera, or on the table of a camera obscura, both of which instruments are constructed roughly on the same principle as the human eye.

These rays of light when reflected from an object, and again when passing through the atmosphere, undergo certain modifications. Should the object be a red one, the yellow, green, and blue rays, all, in fact, except the red rays, are absorbed by the object, while the red is allowed to escape. These red rays striking the retina produce certain effects which convey to our consciousness the sensation of red, and we say "That is a red object." 

-From The Practice & Science of Drawing by Harold Speed (1913)

Which of the following is a detail from that passage about white light?

Possible Answers:

None of these

It lets us see things in their abnormal aspects

It is composed of all of the colors of the spectrum

It is the multiplication of rays

Correct answer:

It is composed of all of the colors of the spectrum

Explanation:

The correct answer is "It is composed of all of the colors of the spectrum." This answer can be found in the lines, "white light, by which we see things in what may be called their normal aspect, is composed of all the colors of the solar spectrum." This lines also tells us that the answer choice "It lets us see things in their abnormal aspects" is incorrect. White light, by definition, is not the multiplication of rays of light. Therefore, the best answer choice is "It is composed of all of the colors of the spectrum."

Example Question #8 : Details

      About forty years ago, M. Henry Dimont, a native of Switzerland, having witnessed the unnecessary suffering of the wounded, from lack of care, at the battle of Solferino, was so much impressed that he published a book, pointing out the necessity of forming a corporation of nurses to work in the cause of humanity in time of war, regardless of nationality of the injured, and who should be permitted to aid the wounded on the battle-field, under the protection of a flag which should be recognized as neutral.

      So much interest was taken in the idea that the outcome was a convention held at Geneva in 1864, which was attended by representatives from sixteen of the great nations of the world, who signed an agreement that they would protect members of the association when caring for the wounded on the field of battle. The society adopted for its colors the Swiss cross, as a compliment to its birthplace; they, however, reversed the colors, and the flag is therefore a red cross on a white field, and is the only military hospital flag of civilized warfare; it protects persons from molestation who work under the emblem performing services in aid of the wounded.

      It was decided that the work of the Red Cross Society should not be confined to times of war, but that in case of disasters and calamities, which were always to be apprehended, the organization was to provide aid. During the past seventeen years the American Red Cross Society has served in fifteen disasters and famines, and Russians, Armenians, and Cubans have received aid from this society.

Adapted from The Great Wide World, Vol. II No. 24, by C. F. Kroeh (1898)

Where was the convention that created the Red Cross Society held?

Possible Answers:

Geneva

Cuba

Russia

London

Correct answer:

Geneva

Explanation:

The correct answer is Geneva. This answer can be found in the first sentence of the second paragraph:  "So much interest was taken in the idea that the outcome was a convention held at Geneva in 1864, which was attended by representatives from sixteen of the great nations of the world, who signed an agreement that they would protect members of the association when caring for the wounded on the field of battle."

Example Question #9 : Details

The ships of the Greeks were very different from modern vessels. Of course they were not driven by steam, nor did they rely as much on sails as modern sailing ships do. They had sails, but were driven forward mostly by their oars. The trireme, or ordinary war-ship, had its oars arranged in three banks, fifty men rowing at once. After these had rowed several hours, or a "watch," another fifty took their places, and finally a third fifty, so that the ships could be rowed at high speed all the time. With the aid of its two sails a trireme is said to have gone one hundred and fifty miles in a day and a night. These boats were about one hundred and twenty feet long and fifteen feet wide. They could be rowed in shallow water, but were not high enough to ride heavy seas safely. They had a sharp beak, which, driven against an enemy's ship, would break in its sides. 

Adapted from Introductory American History by Henry Eldridge Bourne and Elbert Jay Benton (1912)

Which of the following is NOT true about the ancient Greek ships discussed in this passage?

Possible Answers:

The ships were powered by men

The ships could be rowed at high speed

They could go in shallow water but not high seas

The ships were powered by coal

Correct answer:

The ships were powered by coal

Explanation:

The correct answer is "The ships were powered by coal." The question asks for the statement that is false. Three of the details are correct and are supported by the passage: the ships could be rowed at high speeds, the ships were powered by men, and they could go in shallow water but not high seas. The only statement that is false is "The ships were powered by coal."

Example Question #10 : Details

Common ducks are about the same size as common fowls. As the duck in a state of nature lives much upon the water, its form is at nearly every point different from the typical form of the fowl. The duck is usually described as boat-shaped, but, while this is a good description, it would be more correct to say that a boat is duck-shaped. The duck was the natural model for the first builders of boats. The feet of a duck are webbed between the forward toes, which makes them more serviceable as paddles in swimming.

Adapted from Our Domestic Birds: Elementary Lesson in Aviculture by John H. Robinson (1913)

According to the passage, what is the benefit of webbed feet?

Possible Answers:

They help ducks swim

They allow ducks to achieve flight

They are simply a feature and do not serve a purpose

They help ducks run away from predators

Correct answer:

They help ducks swim

Explanation:

The correct answer is "They help ducks swim." We can find this information in the last line of the paragraph: "The feet of a duck are webbed between the forward toes, which makes them more serviceable as paddles in swimming." We know that the webbed feet serve a purpose based on this line. There is no mention of ducks running or flying, but we are told that they live in the water, so the best choice is "They help ducks swim."

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