SSAT Middle Level Verbal : Synonyms: Distinguishing Between Multiple Definitions

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for SSAT Middle Level Verbal

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Example Questions

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Example Question #1 : Synonyms: Distinguishing Between Multiple Definitions

Synonyms: Select the word whose meaning is closest to the word in capital letters.

CHOKE

Possible Answers:

Elevate

Desolate 

Promise 

Bungle

Succeed 

Correct answer:

Bungle

Explanation:

The primary meaning of “choke” is gag or strangle someone, but since none of the answer choices are close in meaning to this definition, you can assume you are searching for a secondary meaning of the word. If you “choke,” then you lose your composure and fail to perform effectively in a critical situation,so you could say, "He had a chance to win the game but he choked." Thus, "choke" used in this way is most similar in meaning to "bungle,"which means mess something up. As for the other answer choices, "elevate" means rise up or place at a higher position; and "desolate" means empty, barren, or devoid of life.

Example Question #2 : Synonyms: Distinguishing Between Multiple Definitions

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

SEETHE

Possible Answers:

Repudiate

Anger

Dispatch

Simmer

Inhabit

Correct answer:

Simmer

Explanation:

"Seethe" is a verb that when used of liquids, means "bubble up as a result of being boiled," and when used of people, "be filled with intense but unexpressed anger." Since none of the answer choices appear to mean "bubble up" or "boil," we need to pick out an answer choice that means something like "be filled with unexpressed anger." "Anger" might look like the best answer choice, but as a verb, it means "make angry"; since its meaning isn't that close to "seethe," it can't be the correct answer. "Simmer," a verb which can mean "be in a state of suppressed anger or excitement," is the best answer choice and the correct answer because it is closest in meaning to "seethe."

Example Question #3 : Synonyms: Distinguishing Between Multiple Definitions

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

BADGER

Possible Answers:

Premeditated

Pester

Desire

Unlimited

Angry

Correct answer:

Pester

Explanation:

A "badger" is an animal, similar to a skunk, but much larger and with a very bad temper. The word "badger" can also be used as an adjective meaning to pester or bother. An example is, "Sam's mother continued to badger him about picking up his clothes."

Example Question #4 : Synonyms: Distinguishing Between Multiple Definitions

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

BALE

Possible Answers:

Suitcase

Wet

Indifferent

Bundle

Throw

Correct answer:

Bundle

Explanation:

Spelled this way, "bale" is a noun meaning a bundle prepared for transportation or storage. It is often associated with hay or cotton. For instance, "The groom spread another bale of hay over the floor of the horse's stall." Spelled "bail," this word is a verb with multiple meanings.

Example Question #5 : Synonyms: Distinguishing Between Multiple Definitions

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

VOLATILE

Possible Answers:

Static

Terrifying

Memorable

Erratic

Loathsome

Correct answer:

Erratic

Explanation:

"Volatile" is an adjective with two meanings. Here, "volatile" means erratic or liable to change unpredictably. The second definition of "volatile" is scientific, and means evaporates at room temperature.

"Static" means not moving or changing. "Memorable" means able to be remembered. "Terrifying" means causes extreme fear. "Loathsome" means hateful or repulsive.

Example Question #6 : Synonyms: Distinguishing Between Multiple Definitions

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

PALLETE

Possible Answers:

Inscribe

Taste

Author

Scribble

Pen

Correct answer:

Taste

Explanation:

The word "pallete" can be used in statements about people's sense of taste. The other words may be slightly related to the word pallete, but the meanings in this sense would not be close enough to call them synonymous.

Example Question #7 : Synonyms: Distinguishing Between Multiple Definitions

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

PRESS

Possible Answers:

Media

Freedom

Politician

Criminal

Conspiracy

Correct answer:

Media

Explanation:

The "press" and the "media" can both refer to journalists as a group. The other nouns do not have directly related meanings and are not synonymous with "press," but are topics often covered by the "press."

Example Question #8 : Synonyms: Distinguishing Between Multiple Definitions

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

POLICE

Possible Answers:

Imprison

Oversee

Cheat

Lie

Punish

Correct answer:

Oversee

Explanation:

The verbs "police"—yes, the word "police" can be used as a verb too—and "oversee" are synonymous. The other words ("imprison," "punish," "lie," etc.) might have indirectly related meanings, but they are not synonymous with "police" when used as a verb.

Example Question #9 : Synonyms: Distinguishing Between Multiple Definitions

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

BLEMISH

Possible Answers:

Purify 

Clean

Cleanse 

Hurt 

Ruin

Correct answer:

Ruin

Explanation:

"Blemish," means to spoil the appearance of (something). The term ruin is a synonym of "blemish," making it the correct answer. "Purify" means to remove contaminants from. The word "hurt" means to cause physical harm or injury. The terms "cleanse" and "clean" are defined similarly; to make (something) thoroughly clean/free from dirt.

Example Question #10 : Synonyms: Distinguishing Between Multiple Definitions

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

ASSESS

Possible Answers:

Cancel

Fix

Charge

Find

Bring

Correct answer:

Charge

Explanation:

The verb "assess" usually means to evaluate, to judge the nature of something, to decide what one thinks of something. However, it also has a second common meaning which is to charge. So, to be "assessed repairs" is to be charged for repairs.

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