SAT II World History : Roman Empire

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for SAT II World History

varsity tutors app store varsity tutors android store

Example Questions

← Previous 1

Example Question #48 : Prehistory To 500 C.E.

Which of these men was not part of the First Triumvirate of Rome? 

Possible Answers:

They were all members 

None of them were members 

Crassus 

Pompey 

Caesar 

Correct answer:

They were all members 

Explanation:

The First Triumvirate of Rome was a political alliance between Julius Caesar, Marcus Crassus, and Pompeius Magnus. It was not an official political organization, but rather a secretive organization that sought to engineer the downfall of the Roman Republic. Following Crassus’ death the Roman world was essentially in the hands of two men - Pompey (his anglicized name), who controlled the Senate and Julius Caesar who controlled the armies of Gaul and enjoyed the most popular support. When Caesar crossed the Rubicon he was declared an enemy of the state and Pompey was charged by the Roman Senate with defeating him. Thus ended the First Triumvirate of Rome; when Caesar defeated Pompey in battle and then had him assassinated. 

Example Question #49 : Prehistory To 500 C.E.

A Roman Emperor was seen in a pre-Christian religious context as

Possible Answers:

the supreme god of the pantheon.

fulfilling a role in worship for select gods.

subordinate only to a chief priest.

the chief priest.

not important to the religion.

Correct answer:

the chief priest.

Explanation:

The Roman Emperor held a number of different titles, including pontifex maximus, which is Latin for "chief priest". The title was held by Julius Caesar as a pre-Empire designation, but given to his adopted son Octavian. When Octavian became the first true Roman Emperor with the title Augustus, he kept the designation of pontifex maximus, which was passed on to later emperors.

Example Question #1 : Roman Empire

During the first century CE, all of the following were features of the Roman Empire EXCEPT which answer choice?

Possible Answers:

A wealthy class of individuals known as the patricians

The prevalence of a polytheistic religion

An expansive network of roads

The widespread acceptance of Christianity

A system of aqueducts

Correct answer:

The widespread acceptance of Christianity

Explanation:

As Christianity developed during the first century CE, its earliest followers  were persecuted in the Roman Empire. Not until the Edict of Milan in 313 CE was Christianity even legal in the empire. Therefore "the widespread acceptance of Christianity" is the correct answer.

All of the other answer choices were true of Rome during the first century CE as it approached its height in the early second century CE.

Example Question #2 : Roman Empire

The Roman Empire __________.

Possible Answers:

was generally tolerant of other religions 

banned Christianity throughout the entirety of its history

failed to contact any of the British Isles

forbade trading throughout the Empire

was defeated by the rising Arab Empire

Correct answer:

was generally tolerant of other religions 

Explanation:

As the Roman Empire expanded through Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East, it came to consist of individuals of a wide variety of religious beliefs. In general, the Roman Empire treated these diverse religious elements with tolerance and a practical acceptance. This changed after the Roman Empire became officially Christian, but as this did not occur until near the downfall of the Roman Empire, it cannot be said to be “generally” indicative of Roman policy.

Example Question #3 : Roman Empire

The Edict of Milan ________.

Possible Answers:

restored Milanese independence following the withdrawal of French troops

made it illegal to practice Judaism in the Roman Empire 

provided for the protection of aristocrats and former generals during the collapse of the Roman Empire 

ended persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire 

established a code of laws for the emerging Roman Empire 

Correct answer:

ended persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire 

Explanation:

In 313 C.E. the Roman Empire was divided between those believers of the ancient religious institutions of Rome and the rapidly growing Christian minority. The Roman politicians, in various attempts to garner support, had been systematically persecuting or tolerating Christianity. The Edict of Milan, however, permanently ended persecution of Christianity in Rome and paved the way for the adoption of Christianity as the official religion of the Empire. It was issued by Emperor Constantine. 

Example Question #4 : Roman Empire

Rome and Carthage fought in ________.

Possible Answers:

 the Peloponnesian War 

the Battle of Salamis 

the North African Campaign 

the War of the Roses

the Punic Wars 

Correct answer:

the Punic Wars 

Explanation:

The Punic Wars were a series of three wars fought between the Roman and Carthaginian Empires between approximately 265 B.C.E. and 145 B.C.E. At the time of the outbreak of war, the Carthaginian Empire was the largest in the Mediterranean and controlled massive swathes of North Africa and Spain. However, the war would eventually end in their total defeat and ushered in half a millennium of Roman dominance of Europe, North Africa and the Middle East. 

Example Question #5 : Roman Empire

The Roman Empire cemented its status as the dominant power in Europe by defeating which other hegemonic power? 

Possible Answers:

Carthage

Gaul

Briton

Egypt

Greece

Correct answer:

Carthage

Explanation:

The Roman Empire rose to prominence in the second and first centuries B.C.E. And cemented their status as the dominant hegemonic power in Europe by defeating Carthage over a series of conflicts collectively called the Punic Wars. Carthage was an empire centered in North Africa (in what is modern day Tunisia). The Carthaginian people were a mixture of Phoenicians and Berber people who combined to form the Punic civilization. 

Example Question #6 : Roman Empire

What name is used to describe the common man in the city of Rome during the time of the Roman Empire?

Possible Answers:

Plebeians

Legions

Bourgeoise

Pax Romana

Immortals

Correct answer:

Plebeians

Explanation:

The common man in the city of Rome during the time of the Roman Empire are generally called “Plebeians,” “Plebs” for short. The term can now carry a connotation of suggesting that someone is ignorant or impoverished.

Example Question #7 : Roman Empire

Which city was a major rival of Rome, fighting several wars with Rome in the third and second centuries BCE?

Possible Answers:

Sparta

Tyre

Athens

Byzantium

Carthage

Correct answer:

Carthage

Explanation:

Carthage was a powerful city-state in North Africa that fought several wars (called the Punic Wars) with Rome for dominance of the Mediterranean Sea in the third and second centuries BCE. Both Athens and Sparta, two once powerful Greek city-states, had long declined by this point, and were individually never major rivals of Rome. Tyre was a once-powerful Phoenician city that had also declined by this point, due to foreign conquest. Byzantium, a Greek city that would later become Constantinople, was never powerful enough in this period to be a major rival of Rome.

Example Question #8 : Roman Empire

In which century was Christianity adopted as the official religion of the Roman Empire?

Possible Answers:

The third century

The fifth century

The second century

The first century

The fourth century

Correct answer:

The fourth century

Explanation:

Christians had long suffered persecution under the rule of the Roman Empire, but the religion continued to grow in prominence and following. In the year 380 C.E. Christianity became the state religion of the Roman Empire following a decree issued by Roman Emperor Theodosius I. Theodosius was inspired by the Nicene Creed (325 C.E.) which was one of the earliest professions of faith in Christianity.

← Previous 1
Learning Tools by Varsity Tutors

Incompatible Browser

Please upgrade or download one of the following browsers to use Instant Tutoring: