SAT II World History : Rise of Protestantism

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for SAT II World History

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Example Questions

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Example Question #1 : Rise Of Protestantism

Which of these people was not a leading figure in the Protestant Reformation? 

Possible Answers:

Ulrich Zwingli

John Calvin

Martin Luther

All of these people were leading figures in the Protestant Reformation. 

Henry VIII

Correct answer:

All of these people were leading figures in the Protestant Reformation. 

Explanation:

All of these people were responsible for spreading or encouraging the break from the Catholic Church that occurred during the Protestant Reformation. Luther sparked the Reformation with his 95 Theses; Calvin and Zwingli adapted and spread the ideas in France and Switzerland; and Henry VIII founded the Church of England and placed himself as head of Christianity in England. 

Example Question #2 : Rise Of Protestantism

The Protestant Reformation began when __________.

Possible Answers:

Thomas Hobbes published The Leviathan

Martin Luther published his 95 Theses

John Knox was executed for heresy

Ulrich Zwingli published his Two Treatises

John Calvin was executed for heresy

Correct answer:

Martin Luther published his 95 Theses

Explanation:

The Protestant Reformation began in 1517 when Martin Luther wrote his 95 Theses on the abuses and malpractice of the Catholic Church and nailed them to the door of a church in Wittenberg.

Example Question #3 : Rise Of Protestantism

How did the religion of the Anabaptists differ from the other religions of the Protestant Reformation?

Possible Answers:

They rejected baptism all together as a Catholic church construct. 

They believed no person could be saved without having been baptized as a baby.

They practiced forced baptism of nonbelievers.

They rejected infant baptism.

None of the other answer choices is correct; the name Anabaptist is a misnomer.

Correct answer:

They rejected infant baptism.

Explanation:

The Anabaptists were a sect of Christianity that emerged during the Protestant Reformation. They rejected the notion of infant baptism and practiced adult baptism. For this crime, they received the ire of Catholics and other Protestants alike, and their stronghold of Munster was besieged and its inhabitants massacred.

Example Question #4 : Rise Of Protestantism

The Ausburg Confession is the primary declaration of faith of this Christian denomination. 

Possible Answers:

Lutheranism

Calvinism

Catholicism

Anabaptism

Anglicanism

Correct answer:

Lutheranism

Explanation:

The Augsburg Confession was issued by a number of German rulers at the Diet of Augsburg in 1530. It formally outlines the Lutheran faith and is the primary confession of faith in the Lutheran religion.

Example Question #5 : Rise Of Protestantism

Which of the following best describes the religious beliefs of the Northern Renaissance man Erasmus? 

Possible Answers:

He was a staunch Catholic who firmly defended the practices of the Catholic Church throughout his life. 

He began life as a Catholic, but quickly grew to loathe the Church and tried to establish his own denomination of Protestantism in Holland. 

He was born in Lutheran Germany and founded the Anabaptist religious movement. 

He was a staunch Catholic who was convinced by the theology of Martin Luther and converted to Lutheranism on his death bed. 

He was a staunch Catholic who wanted to reform the abuses of the Church from within the faith. 

Correct answer:

He was a staunch Catholic who wanted to reform the abuses of the Church from within the faith. 

Explanation:

Erasmus is one of the most celebrated men of the Northern Renaissance. He was born in the Netherlands and lived his whole life as a staunch Catholic. He was however greatly disturbed by the abuses of the clergy within the Catholic Church. He worked tirelessly to try and reform the Church from within. He had many supporters within the humanist and renaissance movement, but was widely condemned by the more polemical supporters from both the Catholic and Protestant camps. 

Example Question #6 : Rise Of Protestantism

The Diet of Worms ruled that __________.

Possible Answers:

John Calvin was a heretic and would be executed when he was apprehended

Calvinists and Anabaptists were not to be afforded the same protections as Lutherans

Martin Luther was a heretic and anybody found following his teachings should be executed

the various princes of the Holy Roman Empire were free to decide between Catholicism and Lutheranism as the official religion of their territory

religious persecution was not permitted under Catholic doctrine, and the Counter Reformation was an affront to God

Correct answer:

Martin Luther was a heretic and anybody found following his teachings should be executed

Explanation:

The Diet of Worms convened in 1521, just four years after Luther posted his 95 Theses and somewhat inadvertently began the Protestant Reformation. The Diet was convened by Charles V and the Holy Roman Empire in order to discuss Luther's challenges to the church and what should be done about him. Luther was called to speak before the Diet, and when he did so was condemned as a heretic. The Diet of Worms resulted in the Edict of Worms, which declared Luther a heretic and all those who followed his teachings as giving up the right to life. Many Princes ignored this ruling, as did many common people, and Luther's influence continued to grow in spite of the church's best efforts.

Example Question #1 : Rise Of Protestantism

Presbyterianism is a branch of __________ that originated in __________.

Possible Answers:

Calvinism . . . Scotland 

Lutheranism . . . Ireland 

Lutheranism . . . Denmark 

Calvinism . . . France 

Lutheranism . . . England 

Correct answer:

Calvinism . . . Scotland 

Explanation:

The Presbyterian Church is a branch of Calvinism that arose in Scotland during the sixteenth century. It was widely influenced by the Scottish theologian and protestant reformer, John Knox, who lived and studied with Calvin in Geneva and then returned to Scotland, bringing the new faith with him. 

Example Question #8 : Rise Of Protestantism

The Munster Rebellion was a(n) __________ attempt to create an egalitarian religious community in sixteenth-century Munster, Germany. 

Possible Answers:

Catholic 

Anglican 

Calvinist 

Lutheran 

Anabaptist

Correct answer:

Anabaptist

Explanation:

The Munster Rebellion took place from 1534 to 1535 in Munster, Germany. The rebellion began when Anabaptist community leaders took control of the city and instituted an egalitarian religious government. Anabaptists believed that all people were equal before God and that all things, including wealth and income, should be shared equally. This, along with many of the other religious beliefs of the Anabaptists, was considered extremely dangerous to the established order, and the rebellion was put down brutally. 

Example Question #9 : Rise Of Protestantism

Which two religions were notably excluded from the Peace of Augsburg? 

Possible Answers:

Lutheranism and Catholicism

Lutheranism and Calvinism

Calvinism and Anabaptism

Catholicism and Anglicanism

Anglicanism and Lutheranism

Correct answer:

Calvinism and Anabaptism

Explanation:

The Peace of Augsburg allowed the ruling Princes of the Holy Roman Empire to determine for their kingdoms whether they would be ruled as a Lutheran or Catholic state; however, the two other major Protestant religions of continental Europe—Calvinism and Anabaptism—were excluded. This would have significant consequences for the next hundred years of European history. Anabaptists were routinely massacred (as in the famous Siege of Munster) and Calvinists were persecuted to the point where, in their desperation, they provided one of the main catalysts for the devastating Thirty Years' War. 

Example Question #10 : Rise Of Protestantism

The Danish Phase, the Swedish Phase, and the French Phase were all part of the __________.

Possible Answers:

Seven Years' War

War of Austrian Succession

War of Spanish Succession

Glorious Revolution

Thirty Years' War

Correct answer:

Thirty Years' War

Explanation:

The Thirty Years' War began as a conflict between Catholic and Protestant forces in Central Europe and the Holy Roman Empire, but as the war wore on it evolved into a continuation of the centuries long battle for continental supremacy between the Bourbons of France and the Hapsburgs of the Holy Roman Empire. The Thirty Years' War is often broken down into four distinct phases—The Bohemian Phase, the Danish Phase, the Swedish Phase, and the French Phase.

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