SAT II World History : Causes and Effects of World War I

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for SAT II World History

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Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Causes And Effects Of World War I

What was the name of the peace treaty signed by the allied powers and Germany after World War I?

Possible Answers:

The Treaty of York

The Treaty of Berlin

The Treaty of Paris

The Treaty of Munich

The Treaty of Versailles

Correct answer:

The Treaty of Versailles

Explanation:

World War I ended with the capitulation of the Germans and a victory for the allied powers. The treaty was called the Treaty of Versailles, and it is very important for understanding what would happen next in the history of Europe. The treaty essentially blamed Germany for the entirety of World War I and established harsh, almost impossible, conditions and debts for the Germans to try and pay off. This led, directly, to the rise of Hitler and Nazism and the outbreak of World War II.

Example Question #2 : Causes And Effects Of World War I

The Triple Entente was signed between France and which two other nations?

Possible Answers:

Britain and Turkey

Russia and Germany

Britain and Spain

Britain and Italy

Britain and Russia

Correct answer:

Britain and Russia

Explanation:

The main reason why large-scale conflict broke out in World War I was the series of entangling alliances that existed before the war. In the pre-war years, all the nations of Europe were heavily nationalistic and heavily militarized. They all feared the strength of each other and sought to ensure their protection by signing treaties. So, the Germans, surrounded on all sides by possible enemies, signed alliances with Austria-Hungary and Italy. The French, fearing the threat posed by the Germans, signed treaties with Russia and Great Britain. The Triple Entente was signed between France, Britain, and Russia to provide for their mutual protection. 

Example Question #3 : Causes And Effects Of World War I

The alliance opposed to the Triple Entente, called the Triple Alliance, was formed between __________.

Possible Answers:

Germany, Russia, and Austria-Hungary

Germany, Japan, and Italy

Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Poland

Germany, Russia, and Italy

Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy

Correct answer:

Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy

Explanation:

The Triple Alliance, designed to counter the threat of the Triple Entente (the alliance between Britain, France, and Russia) involved an alliance between Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy.

Example Question #1 : Causes And Effects Of World War I

Why was the League of Nations in many ways doomed to fail from the very beginning? 

Possible Answers:

It ignored the rights of non-American and non-European countries.

It was supported by the Japanese, but rejected by the Chinese and the Vietnamese.

It rejected any inclusion of communist nations.

Congress rejected America's involvement.

It did not allow Germany or Austria to be members.

Correct answer:

Congress rejected America's involvement.

Explanation:

The League of Nations was the brainchild of American President Woodrow Wilson who put forth the suggestion as part of his Fourteen Points at the Paris Peace Conference. Although the League was approved and formed by the international powers, when Wilson returned to America, he found that Congress was unwilling to immerse America so fully in the global experience. Congress rejected the peace treaty and American involvement in the League of Nations. This ensured that from the very beginning the League was without one of the preeminent world powers.

Example Question #5 : Causes And Effects Of World War I

The status of the territory of Morocco was disputed by __________ before World War One.

Possible Answers:

France and Britain

France and Germany

Italy and France

Spain and Germany

Britain and Germany

Correct answer:

France and Germany

Explanation:

During the early twentieth century, Germany and France heavily disputed the status of Morocco. This was one of the primary sources of tension between the two nations in the buildup to World War One.

Example Question #6 : Causes And Effects Of World War I

Who assassinated the Archduke Franz Ferdinand?

Possible Answers:

Benjamin Disraeli 

Thomas Malthus 

Gavrilo Princip 

Giuseppe Garibaldi 

Charles de Gaulle 

Correct answer:

Gavrilo Princip 

Explanation:

Gavrilo Princip assassinated Franz Ferdinand and his wife on July 28th, 1914. Princip was a member of the Black Hand, an organization dedicated to the liberation of the Yugoslav people from the rule of the Austro-Hungarian empire. The Austrian empire used the assassination as a pretext to invade Serbia and thus committed the first act of aggression of the First World War.

Example Question #23 : 1900 C.E. To Present

What was the direct inciting incident that led to the outbreak of World War One?

Possible Answers:

German bombing raids on the British isles

the attempted assassination of British Prime Minister David Lloyd George

Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor

the assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand

German invasion of Belgium and Czechoslovakia

Correct answer:

the assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand

Explanation:

The assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand by Serbian nationalist forces in 1914 was the direct inciting incident that led to the outbreak of World War One. In the years leading up to World War One the major powers of Europe signed extensive alliances with one another that ensured that if one country declared war on another country all the rest would be dragged into the conflict like falling dominoes. The Triple Entente between Britain, France, and Russia made the Germans and Austro-Hungarians feel threatened; the British promised to protect Belgian sovereignty; the Russians promised to fight for Serbian autonomy and so on.

Example Question #8 : Causes And Effects Of World War I

Which of the following contributed the least to mounting international tensions leading to the outbreak of World War I?

Possible Answers:

Imperialism

Nationalism

Pan-Slavism

Militarism

Communism

Correct answer:

Communism

Explanation:

Communism was not yet a major factor in international affairs in the period leading up to World War I, as the Russian Revolution had not yet happened. Nationalism and pan-slavism led to the increased ethnic tensions in Europe, especially in the Balkans, and they ultimately provided immediate catalysts for the war, namely the Serbian murder of Austrian archduke Franz Ferdinand and Russia's alliance with Serbia. Imperialism and militarism both contributed to growing rivalry and tension among the major European powers, namely Germany, Britain, and France. Imperialist ambitions, in particular, led to diplomatic incidents (such as the Agadir Crisis of 1911) that heightened tensions among these nations, especially due to British and French fears of German aggression.

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