MCAT Social and Behavioral Sciences : Self-Concept and Social Identity

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for MCAT Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Self Concept And Social Identity

Jimmy and Nate both volunteer at the dog pound. Jimmy loves animals of all kinds and loves the chance to be around dogs. Nate doesn’t particularly like animals, but he needs service hours for a club he is in at school. 

At the end of his experience at the dog pound, Nate has grown to love the feeling of helping dogs. He feels positive about his individual worth. Nate has experienced a change in which of the following?

Possible Answers:

Self-efficacy

Self-concept

None of these

Self-esteem

Correct answer:

Self-esteem

Explanation:

Nate’s increase in self-worth directly correlates with “self-esteem,” or the belief that one’s self is important or valuable. “Self-efficacy” usually refers to one’s confidence in accomplishing a certain task. “Self-concept” is an idea of how someone internally defines himself or herself, or what sets that individual apart from others.

Example Question #2 : Self Concept And Social Identity

The idea of the looking-glass self suggests that a person's sense of self results from the perception of others. The sociological theory that best aligns with this idea is which of the following?

Possible Answers:

Symbolic interaction theory

None of these

Social constructionism

Conflict theory

Labeling theory

Correct answer:

Symbolic interaction theory

Explanation:

"Symbolic interactionism" states that meaning is a social product derived from interaction with others, and is the framework for the looking-glass self posited by Charles Cooley. On the other hand, "conflict theory" describes power and social stability, while the "labeling theory" examines the influence of terms attached to individuals. Last, "social constructionism" looks at the ways in which social realities are created by groups and individuals. It does not describe a person's self-identity.

All MCAT Social and Behavioral Sciences Resources

133 Practice Tests Question of the Day Flashcards Learn by Concept
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