ISEE Upper Level Verbal : Synonyms: Suffixes from Latin

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for ISEE Upper Level Verbal

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Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Synonyms: Suffixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

LEGIBLE

Possible Answers:

Political

Regulated

Law-like

Legal

Readable

Correct answer:

Readable

Explanation:

The word “legible” comes from the Latin “legere” meaning to read. The English word means clear and readable. It is related to the word “lector,” which means reader. Often people will talk about “legible handwriting,” but the word can be used to describe print words that are likewise readable.

Example Question #2 : Synonyms: Suffixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

MYOPIC

Possible Answers:

unimaginative

transmission

oversight

blindness

vision

Correct answer:

unimaginative

Explanation:

If you did notice the meaning of eyes in the “-opic” portion of this word, you were on the right track. What “myopic” literally means is shut-eyes. When someone has “myopia,” that person is nearsighted (needing corrective lenses to see things at distance). Someone is called myopic when that person figuratively has shut eyes or is unable to imagine or think about things that are not immediately at hand. The person is “unimaginative” and perhaps intellectually uncreative. The word would be used in a sentence like, “Since the couple rarely left their state of residence, they were quite myopic regarding potential employment options since they only thought in terms of their local economy.”

Example Question #3 : Synonyms: Suffixes From Latin

Answer the following question by selecting the word that is most nearly the same in meaning as the word in capital letters.

CHAUVINIST

Possible Answers:

dubious

stoic

vitriolic

vital

jingoist

Correct answer:

jingoist

Explanation:

"Chauvinist" and "jingoist" both mean bigoted or overly patriotic. "Stoic" means philosophic. "Vital" means essential or critical. "Dubious" means doubtful or equivocal. "Vitriolic" means bitter or scathing

Example Question #4 : Synonyms: Suffixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

CARTOGRAPHER

Possible Answers:

Geometer

Mariner

Mapmaker

Cook

Analyst

Correct answer:

Mapmaker

Explanation:

Looking at the parts of this word, we can get a general idea of its meaning. The “-grapher” clearly means “one who draws, graphs, records, etc.” A “photographer” can be said to take a record of the light (“photo-”) in the sense of recording the image before the camera. The “carto-” portion of the word is related to “card” and ultimately to the word “map.” Even if you cannot get to that last point, if you at least see the similarity to “card,” you will likely avoid the options “geometer” and “geomancer.” Based on what has been said, the best option is “mapmaker.”

Example Question #5 : Synonyms: Suffixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

NULLIFY

Possible Answers:

Sanctify

Ratify

Validate

Revoke

Vituperate

Correct answer:

Revoke

Explanation:

"Nullify" and "revoke" both mean to cancel or invalidate. "Validate" means to ascertain the truth of something. "Ratify" means to affirm or authorize. "Sanctify" means to hold in highest esteem. "Vituperate" means to criticize sharply

Example Question #6 : Synonyms: Suffixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

LAUDABLE

Possible Answers:

Exacting

Foreseen

Adequate

Commendable

Acceptable

Correct answer:

Commendable

Explanation:

To “laud” someone is to praise that person. When something is “laudable,” it is “praise worthy.” The only word matching this is “commendable” which itself means “deserving of praise.”

Example Question #7 : Synonyms: Suffixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

CHURLISH

Possible Answers:

Mutable

Notorious

Haughty

Acrid

Vulgar

Correct answer:

Vulgar

Explanation:

"Churlish" is an adjective that means "rude in a mean-spirited and surly way," or "marked by a lack of civility or graciousness." So, we're looking for another adjective that means something like "rude" or "uncivil." While "haughty" seems like a possible choice because someone who is haughty might also be rude, "haughty" specifically means "arrogantly superior and disdainful," not specifically "rude." On the other hand, "vulgar" means "lacking in cultivation, perception, or taste" or "offensive in language," and is the closest synonym to "churlish," and therefore the best answer choice.

Example Question #8 : Synonyms: Suffixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

SENSIBLE

Possible Answers:

Obscure

Apparent

Blinding

Manifest

Reasonable

Correct answer:

Reasonable

Explanation:

The word “sensible” is clearly related to the notion of “the senses” and what can be perceived by them. It is often used to express the fact that someone is “down to earth” or quite “practical”—always keeping things at the level of observable reality, not detached in idealism or grand speculation. Because of these latter usages, the word has become synonymous with “reasonable” in many of its normal usages.

Example Question #9 : Synonyms: Suffixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

AMPLIFY

Possible Answers:

Duplicate

Maneuver

Repeat

Digitize

Intensify

Correct answer:

Intensify

Explanation:

The word “amplify” literally means “to make larger.” The “ampli-” portion is the same as that which is found in “ample” (spacious or plentiful) and “amplitude” (roughly meaning “magnitude,” often used in physics to describe vibrations).   The “-fy” means “to do or make.” The word “amplify” is often used to describe the process of making sounds louder, though it can mean “intensify” in the general sense as well.

Example Question #10 : Synonyms: Suffixes From Latin

Select the answer choice that is closest in meaning to the word in capital letters.

LEGIBLE

Possible Answers:

Regulated

Readable

Law-like

Political

Legal

Correct answer:

Readable

Explanation:

The word “legible” comes from the Latin “legere” meaning to read. The English word means clear and readable. It is related to the word “lector,” which means reader. Often people will talk about “legible handwriting,” but the word can be used to describe print words that are likewise readable.

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