Human Anatomy and Physiology : Identifying Joints of the Extremities

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for Human Anatomy and Physiology

varsity tutors app store varsity tutors android store

Example Questions

← Previous 1

Example Question #1 : Identifying Joints Of The Extremities

In which direction is a shoulder dislocation most likely to occur?

Possible Answers:

Anterior and superior

Posterior and superior

Anterior and inferior

Distal and superior

Posterior and inferior

Correct answer:

Anterior and inferior

Explanation:

A shoulder dislocation occurs when the humeral head is removed from the glenoid fossa. The clavicle and coracoacromial ligament are located superior to the joint, preventing superior dislocation, and the body o the scapula is posterior to the joint, preventing posterior dislocation. Most commonly, the humeral head is pushed forward and downward. There is the least resistance to dislocation in the anterior and inferior directions; though glenohumeral dislocation can occur in other orientations, these are far less common.

Example Question #2 : Identifying Joints Of The Extremities

Which upper extremity nerve is at risk of injury after dislocation of the shoulder?

Possible Answers:

Median nerve

Ulnar nerve

Axillary nerve

Musculocutaneous nerve

Radial nerve 

Correct answer:

Axillary nerve

Explanation:

The axillary nerve travels through the quadrangular space with the posterior circumflex humeral artery, and can be damaged due to trauma of the upper extremity, particularly anterior-inferior shoulder dislocations. When the dislocation is reduced, placement of the humeral head can displace or damage the nerve if done improperly.

Example Question #3 : Identifying Joints Of The Extremities

Often in physiology, joints are described by three characteristics: their functional class, which describes the degree of mobility the joint affords; their structural class, which describes how the joint is housed; and their shape.

Which of the following correctly lists, in order, the functional class, structural class, and shape of the joints between the metacarpals and phalanges?

Possible Answers:

Amphiarthrosis, synovial, pivot

Amphiarthrosis, fibrous, syndesmosis

Diarthrosis, synovial, condyloid

Synarthrosis, fibrous, suture

Diarthrosis, synovial, pivot

Correct answer:

Diarthrosis, synovial, condyloid

Explanation:

The joints between the metacarpals and phalanges in the hand are classified as diarthrosis (allows full motion), synovial (encased in a capsule filled with synovial fluid, true of all diarthrosis joints by default), and condyloid (ovoid in shape, sometimes received into an elliptical cavity).

Example Question #36 : Joints

Which of the following is not generally considered to be one of the joints of the ankle?

Possible Answers:

Talocrural joint

Inferior tibiofibular joint

All of these are typically considered joints of the ankle

Subtalar joint

Cuboid-metatarsal joint

Correct answer:

Cuboid-metatarsal joint

Explanation:

The cuboid-metatarsal joint is a joint that connects the cuboid bone to the metatarsals, and is not generally considered part of the three major ankle joints. Instead, it is generally classified as a joint in the foot.

Example Question #4 : Identifying Joints Of The Extremities

Joints are often named for the two bones they connect, but sometimes bear common alternate names that give no such indication.

Which joint of the foot occurs at the meeting point of the talus and calcaneus?

Possible Answers:

Inferior tibiofibular joint

Superior tibiofibular joint

Talocrural joint

None of these

Subtalar joint

Correct answer:

Subtalar joint

Explanation:

The subtalar joint, also called the talocalcaneal joint, is a condyloid (plane synovial) joint that allows for the inversion/eversion mechanism of the foot, but not dorsiflexion or plantarflexion. It is sometimes combined with the navicular joint to form the talocalcaneonavicular joint when considering the motion of the whole ankle.

Example Question #5 : Identifying Joints Of The Extremities

Which of the following structures of the arm does not directly connect to the radiocarpal joint (wrist joint)?

Possible Answers:

Articular disk

Distal end of the ulna

Distal end of the radius

Ulnar collateral joint

Palmar radiocarpal joint

Correct answer:

Distal end of the ulna

Explanation:

The ulna is not part of the radiocarpal joint—if it were, the forces acting on the joint would prevent proper flexion and extension, limiting hand mobility and causing excessive damage from counterforces caused by the radius. Instead, a thin fibrocartiliginous ligament called the articular disk sits between the distal end of the ulna and the radiocarpal joint, allowing for a smooth, concave surface on the proximal side of the joint.

Example Question #6 : Identifying Joints Of The Extremities

Where does the humerus articulate with the scapula?

Possible Answers:

Olecranon

Glenoid cavity

Acromion

Coracoid process

Correct answer:

Glenoid cavity

Explanation:

The glenoid cavity of the scapula is the place of articulation between the scapula and the humerus. The acromion and coracoid process are not sites of joint articulation and the olecranon is not found on the scapula, but on the ulna.

Example Question #7 : Identifying Joints Of The Extremities

The head of the radius articulates with which bony prominence?

Possible Answers:

Ulnar styloid process

Scaphoid bone

Capitellum of the humerus

Trochlea of humerus

Olecranon fossa of humerus

Correct answer:

Capitellum of the humerus

Explanation:

The radiohumeral joint of the elbow is formed by the articulation between the head of the radius, and the capitellum of the humerus. While the trochlea of the humerus, and the olecranon fossa do form part of the elbow, they articulate with the ulna. The scaphoid does articulate with the raidius, but at the distal end of the bone.

Example Question #7 : Identifying Joints Of The Extremities

What kind of joint is the elbow?

Possible Answers:

Gliding

Ball and socket

Hinge

Saddle

Correct answer:

Hinge

Explanation:

The elbow is a hinge joint, as it is only about to move in one plane of motion. The thumb is a saddle joint as it can move in multiple directions. The bones of the wrist are gliding joints as they are two flat surfaces moving over each other. Lastly, the shoulder is an example of ball and socket as it has a very wide range of motion.

Example Question #41 : Joints

Which of the following two shoulder joints work together to combine movements to allow for an increase in "reach" of the upper limb?

Possible Answers:

Acromioclavicular and sternohumeral

Glenohumeral and acromioclavicular

Sternoclavicular and glenohumeral

Sternohumeral and glenohumeral

Sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular

Correct answer:

Sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular

Explanation:

The sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular joints link two bones of the pectoral girdle to each other and to the trunk of the body. They also combine their movements to increase reach length of the upper limb. They are both synovial joints and surrounded by a joint capsule with numerous ligaments to reinforce their movements. The glenohumeral joint serves in articulation of the humerus and scapula. The Sternohumeral joint does not exist.

← Previous 1
Learning Tools by Varsity Tutors

Incompatible Browser

Please upgrade or download one of the following browsers to use Instant Tutoring: