Human Anatomy and Physiology : Identifying Bones of the Skull

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for Human Anatomy and Physiology

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Example Questions

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Example Question #1 : Identifying Bones Of The Skull

The crista galli is a part of which skull bone?

Possible Answers:

Frontal bone

Ethmoid bone

Sphenoid bone

Temporal bone

Correct answer:

Ethmoid bone

Explanation:

The crista galli is the part of the ethmoid bone that is a point of attachment for the meninges of the brain. The crista galli is the most superior point on the ethmoid.

Example Question #2 : Identifying Bones Of The Skull

Which of the following bones does not contain a sinus?

Possible Answers:

Temporal bone

Frontal bone

Sphenoid bone

Maxillary bone

Correct answer:

Temporal bone

Explanation:

There are four paranasal sinuses in the head: the frontal, maxillary, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinuses. They function in lightening the skull, and creating mucous for the nasal cavity. The temporal bone does not contain a sinus.

Example Question #3 : Identifying Bones Of The Skull

Which facial bone is responsible for the formation of the lateral wall of the orbitals?

Possible Answers:

Palatine bones

Nasal bones

Lacrimal bones

Zygomatic bones

Maxillary bones

Correct answer:

Zygomatic bones

Explanation:

While many bones are responsible for the formation of the orbit, it is the zygomatic bones that make up the lateral portion of the orbitals. You can remember this by keeping in mind that the zygomatic bones are also called the cheek bones, and are on the lateral sides of your face.

The frontal bone forms the superior region of the orbital, and the lacrimal bone forms the medial border. The maxillary and zygomatic bones each form part of the inferior border, with the zygomatic bone extending into the lateral border. The sphenoid and ethmoid bones both form the posterior wall, with the sphenoid region lateral to the ethmoid region.

Example Question #4 : Identifying Bones Of The Skull

Where are the parietal bones of the skull located?

Possible Answers:

On the front of the head

On the back of the head

On the sides and top of the head

On the top of the head

On the forehead

Correct answer:

On the sides and top of the head

Explanation:

The parietal bones of the skull reside over the parietal lobes of the brain. The parietal lobe is just on top of the occipital lobe and is responsible for various sensory information processing. The parietal bones of the skull lie on either side of the head, slightly posterior to the ear area, and meet on top of the head.

Example Question #5 : Identifying Bones Of The Skull

The coronal suture is located at the joining of which bones in the skull?

Possible Answers:

Frontal and occipital bones

Parietal and occipital bones 

Parietal and frontal bones

Parietal and temporal bones

Frontal and temporal bones

Correct answer:

Parietal and frontal bones

Explanation:

The coronal suture is the area at the "top" of the skull where the parietal bones and the frontal bones meet, and is not normally closed at birth (thus, the traditional "soft spot" near the exact top of a newborn's head).

Remember that the coronal plane traverses the body from left to right, separating the anterior and posterior dimensions. As such, the coronal suture can be expected to fall within this plane.

Example Question #6 : Identifying Bones Of The Skull

Containing not only the floors and sides of the orbits, but also the saddle-shaped mass housing the pituitary gland, this bone helps form the inferior cranial base, the septum of the nose, and the top of the nasal cavity.

Possible Answers:

Vomer

Maxilla

Zygomatic bone

Ethmoid bone

Sphenoid bone

Correct answer:

Sphenoid bone

Explanation:

The sphenoid bone, located posterior and inferior to the face, supports most of the immovable bones of the face and is thus critical to the development of facial structure. The bone also contains two "wing" projections that curve towards the sides of the skull, which may help to stabilize the cranium during lateral impacts, and the sella turcica, a concave space that houses the pituitary gland.

Example Question #7 : Identifying Bones Of The Skull

Which of the bones of the skull forms most of the superior and lateral faces of the cranium?

Possible Answers:

Temporal

 Parietal

Maxilla

Frontal

Occipital

Correct answer:

 Parietal

Explanation:

The parietal bones (one on each side of the skull) form a shield-shaped dome across the top of the skull, creating most of the bulging sides and top of the cranium. The parietal bones are useful in distinguishing the skulls of modern man from Australopithecine ancestors. The bone has a large opening, the parietal foramen, through which blood supply and nerves enter.

Example Question #8 : Identifying Bones Of The Skull

Which bone of the skull forms most of the inferior and posterior faces of the skull?

Possible Answers:

Parietal

Temporal

Occipital

Frontal

Maxilla

Correct answer:

Occipital

Explanation:

The occipital bone forms the base of the skull, and contains the opening (foramen magnum) through which the thick nerve fibers that will form the spinal cord emerge. It houses the occipital lobe of the cerebrum, which is responsible for visual processing and holds the visual cortex.

Example Question #9 : Identifying Bones Of The Skull

Which of the bones of the skull contains the openings and forms the anchors for the ears and jaw?

Possible Answers:

Temporal bone

Frontal bone

Maxilla

Parietal bone

Occipital bone

Correct answer:

Temporal bone

Explanation:

The temporal bones (one on each side) form the mandibular fossae, which join the mandible to stabilize the jaw. The bone also forms part of the prominence of the cheek, the meatus for neck and tongue muscles, and contains the gap through which the ear is formed.

Example Question #10 : Identifying Bones Of The Skull

Which bone of the skull forms the anterior covering for the brain, sinus cavities, and may contain a supraorbital notch?

Possible Answers:

Maxilla

Temporal bone

Frontal bone

Occipital bone

Parietal bone

Correct answer:

Frontal bone

Explanation:

The frontal bone forms the "forehead" and anterior part of the superior skull. It contains the roof of the nasal cavity, the roof of the orbital sockets, and in some skeletons shows a bony notch or supraforamen.

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