Human Anatomy and Physiology : Help with Joint Physiology

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for Human Anatomy and Physiology

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Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Help With Joint Physiology

Which joint type allows for little to no movement between the connected bones?

Possible Answers:

Synovial joints

Diarthrotic joints

Fibrous joints

Cartilaginous joints

Correct answer:

Fibrous joints

Explanation:

There are three main joint categories: synovial, fibrous, and cartilaginous. Synovial joints have the largest range of movement, and are characterized by the presence of articular cartilage and synovial fluid. Fibrous joints lack cartilage and allow for little to no movement. Cartilaginous joints are formed by bands of cartilage between bones, and generally have some limited movement. The shoulder is a synovial joint, the sutures of the skull are fibrous joints, and the intervertebral joints are cartilaginous joints.

Diarthrosis is used to describe joints with wide ranges of movement. Amphiarthrosis describes joints with limited movement, while synarthrosis describes joints with no movement. Almost all fibrous joints are synarthrotic.

Example Question #1 : Help With Joint Physiology

Which of the following types of joints exists between the phalanges in your fingers?

Possible Answers:

Gliding joints

Saddle joints

Biaxial joints

Ball and socket joints

Hinge joints

Correct answer:

Hinge joints

Explanation:

Your fingers are able to flex and extend. This type of motion is bidirectional, but along only one axis. This type of joint is called a hinge joint, at which you are able to flex and extend along an axis, with no side to side motion.

Example Question #32 : Skeletal And Articular Physiology

What gelatinous material primarily allows for the compression and torsion forces that dictate motion in spinal joints and vertebrae?

Possible Answers:

Fibrocartilage

Annulus fibrosus

Lumbar cushion

Nucleus pulposus 

Hyaline cartilage

Correct answer:

Nucleus pulposus 

Explanation:

The nucleus pulposus is a gelatinous, spongy material located in the core of the vertebral disk. This material responds directly to the pressures of the spinal joints, allowing for twisting, compressing, and stretching forces acting upon the spinal joints and vertebrae. This material can become less resilient with age, but generally does not disintegrate or die as other structures do.

Example Question #2 : Help With Joint Physiology

The rhomboids downwardly rotate the scapula at the __________ joint. 

Possible Answers:

facet

sternoclavicular

scapulocostal

spinal

glenohumeral

Correct answer:

scapulocostal

Explanation:

When the rhomboids contract, they pull on the scapula, causing the inferior angle of the scapula to swing up toward the spine. This causes the glenoid fossa to orient downward. Thus, the scapula is downwardly rotated by the rhomboids at the scapulocostal joint. 

Example Question #4 : Help With Joint Physiology

When the trunk is fixed and the psoas minor contracts, it pulls the pelvis anteriorly and superiorly towards the spine. This motion is called posterior tilt of the pelvis and occurs at the __________ joint. 

Possible Answers:

sacroiliac 

hip

lumbosacral

costospinal

thoracic spinal

Correct answer:

lumbosacral

Explanation:

When the psoas minor contracts to flex the lower trunk relative to the upper trunk, this posterior tilting of the pelvis occurs at the lumbosacral joint. 

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