HSPT Language Skills : Composition: Choosing Appropriate Conjunctions

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for HSPT Language Skills

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Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Composition: Choosing Appropriate Conjunctions

Choose the word that best and most logically connects the two parts of the sentence.

Francine can be forgetful and needed to remember to get many specific ingredients for a recipe she wanted to try; __________, she wrote a grocery list before going to the store.

Possible Answers:

but

therefore

nevertheless

however

Correct answer:

therefore

Explanation:

Conjunctions are like grammatical hinges between two ideas. To choose the correct conjunction, we need to analyze how the meanings of the two parts of the sentence connect. In the first part of the sentence, we're told that Francine is forgetful and has something she needs to remember. How might this connect to the idea of writing a grocery list? The first part of the sentence is a cause or impetus for Francine to write a grocery list. So, we need to pick out a conjunction that conveys cause and effect.

The two parts of the sentence do not oppose one another or conflict, so "but," "however," or "nevertheless" cannot be correct. The correct answer is "therefore." This is the only conjunction listed in the answer choices that conveys the cause-and-effect that we logically need for this sentence.

Example Question #2 : Composition: Choosing Appropriate Conjunctions

Choose the word that best and most logically connects the two parts of the sentence.

Yesterday, I wanted to go directly to the beach after stopping in town, __________ I brought my beach towel and umbrella to town with me.

Possible Answers:

so

but

and

despite the fact that

Correct answer:

so

Explanation:

The most logical conjunction for this sentence is "so." The first part of the sentence explains the motivation behind the action that takes place in the second part of the sentence. Conjunctions like "so" and "therefore" convey cause-and-effect relationships like the one in the sentence, so either could work well in the blank. Only "so" is listed amongst the answer choices, so it is the correct answer. "And" is used to connect two sentences when they are not being contrasted or a cause-and-effect relationship between the two parts of the sentence is not at work. "Despite the fact that" is similar to "but" in that one of the parts of the sentence must be working against the other part: "Despite A, B happened." The best answer in this case is "so."

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