GRE Verbal : Two Adjectives or Adverbs in Two-Blank Texts

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for GRE Verbal

varsity tutors app store varsity tutors android store

Example Questions

← Previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 12 13

Example Question #1 : Two Adjectives Or Adverbs In Two Blank Texts

The raft                 floated on the                 ocean waves, lulling the young man to sleep under the rays of the summer sun.

Possible Answers:

enjoyably . . . morning

ceaselessly . . . fleeting

lightly . . . warm

buoyantly . . . warm

placidly . . . undulating

Correct answer:

placidly . . . undulating

Explanation:

"Buoyantly, warm" is a trap to try to get you to choose a seemingly close, "practice list" word—buoyant—with "warm," luring you because of the apparent connection to the sun rays.  Likewise, "ceaselessly . . . fleeting" tries to trap you into overthinking the answer. The sense of the sentence wants you to consider the calmness of the waves because of the key word "lulling;" therefore, the best answer is "placidly" (calmly) and "undulating" (moving like a wave—with the overtone of gentleness, though not necessarily).

Example Question #2 : Two Adjectives Or Adverbs In Two Blank Texts

After fifty years of marriage,                         affairs still did not tire the old couple.  They                        persevered in the often overwhelming duties of their life-long commitment.

Possible Answers:

diurnal . . . regularly

connubial . . . doggedly

amorous . . . joyfully

erotic . . . rapaciously

tedious . . . lovingly

Correct answer:

connubial . . . doggedly

Explanation:

Several of these options are tempting. Perhaps "amorous" and "joyfully" seem to make sense, as does "tedious" and "lovingly." The key phrase, though, is "often overwhelming."  This indicates that the perseverance is more than a minor affair of "pushing along;"  therefore, it would be best to have a word to capture a certain tenacity in this regard.  "Rapaciously" does not really fit the bill for this, but "doggedly" does. Likewise, "connubial" means related to marriage and thus fits the fact that the duties are "of" the life-long commitment. That is, they are "of a marital nature" (or at least related thereto).

Example Question #3 : Two Adjectives Or Adverbs In Two Blank Texts

Not used to the etiquette of high society, the common man behaved __________, much to the chagrin of the __________ and endlessly polite dinner guests.

Possible Answers:

tediously . . . boorish

tediously . . . glib

indecorously . . . boorish

aptly . . . glib

indecorously . . . prudish

Correct answer:

indecorously . . . prudish

Explanation:

The man most likely did not follow the rules of high etiquette, or behaved indecorously. The dinner guests, on the other hand, seem to over-value the rules of politeness, being prudish.

Example Question #4 : Two Adjectives Or Adverbs In Two Blank Texts

__________ owls of that species have __________, fluff on their bellies, and don't lose their striped appearance until they molt and gain their adult feathers when they're a year old.

Possible Answers:

juvenile . . . pedantic

ambiguous . . . apathetic

fledgling . . . striated

precarious . . . phlegmatic

hegemonic . . . caustic

Correct answer:

fledgling . . . striated

Explanation:

For the first blank, we need an adjective that means something like "young," because the owls don't lose their striped down until they're a year old. Possible choices include "fledgling" ("relating to a young bird") and "juvenile" ("of, for, or relating to someone or something young"). For the second blank, we need a word that means "striped;" since "striated" means "striped" and "pedantic" means "narrowly, stodgily, and often ostentatiously learned," "striated" is the better choice, and the answer is "fledgling, striated."

Example Question #5 : Two Adjectives Or Adverbs In Two Blank Texts

The __________ manner of the young man was in stark contrast with the __________ older businessman.

 
Possible Answers:

urbane ... phlegmatic

decorous . . . boorish

 

esurient ... penurious

tedious . . . timorous

 

pellucid . . . limpid

 
Correct answer:

decorous . . . boorish

 
Explanation:

Here we have a contrast: there aren't any clue to what the words are, but they should be opposites. The best fit is "decorous" and "boorish"—the first meaning "characterized by proper manners" and the latter "unmannered and crude."

 

Example Question #6 : Two Adjectives Or Adverbs In Two Blank Texts

Suzanne never doubted the words of even the most __________ liar. Her __________ personality led her to fall into the plotting hands of even the most well known scoundrels.

Possible Answers:

repentant . . . charitable

loquacious . . . rapt

notable . . . forgiving

mendacious . . . ingenuous

fulminating . . . placid

Correct answer:

mendacious . . . ingenuous

Explanation:

From the context, it would seem that Suzanne has a rather innocent and naïve personality. (She misses even the most well known scoundrels.) Now, we might call the liar "notable," but in this case, "forgiving" does not completely fit as well as does the correct answer. "Mendacious" does in a sense reduplicate the sense of lying, but in so doing, it strengthens the indictment against such persons. Particularly, "ingenuous" captures Suzanne's innocent and unsuspecting personality.

Example Question #1 : Two Adjectives Or Adverbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that, when inserted into the sentence, best completes the sentence.

Dave took everything that was said to him seriously, even __________ comments, which often forced his friends to digress from the topic of conversation to explain jokes which were normally left __________

Possible Answers:

viscous . . . querulous

filial . . . luminous

facetious . . . tacit

pusillanimous . . . pithy

sportive . . . austere

Correct answer:

facetious . . . tacit

Explanation:

For the first blank, we're looking for an adjective that means the opposite of "serious." Either "facetious," which means joking or jesting, often inappropriately or "sportive," which means playful or lighthearted,could work. For the second blank, we need an adjective that means not explained. In choosing between "tacit" (understood or implied without being directly stated) and "austere" (severe or strict in manner, attitude, or appearance), "tacit" is the better choice, so "facetious . . . tacit" is the correct answer.

Example Question #2 : Two Adjectives Or Adverbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that, when inserted into the sentence, best completes the sentence.

The butler completed his tasks in a __________ manner, barely paying attention to his work as he overheard the household's __________ scandal in its earliest stages of hushed conversations and snide comments. 

Possible Answers:

pervasive . . . aggrandized

perfunctory . . . nascent

hackneyed . . . implacable

desultory . . . resolute

sordid . . . boisterous

Correct answer:

perfunctory . . . nascent

Explanation:

For the first blank, we're looking for an adjective that reflects how the butler worked without paying attention to his work. Either "perfunctory" (carried out with a minimum of effort or reflection) or "desultory" (lacking a plan, purpose, or enthusiasm) could work. For the second blank, we need an adjective that describes how the household scandal is "in its earliest stages." In choosing between "nascent" (just beginning to develop) and "resolute" (admirably determined), "nascent" is the better choice, so the answer is "perfunctory . . . nascent."

Example Question #3 : Two Adjectives Or Adverbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that, when inserted into the sentence, best completes the sentence.

The river, which was normally so __________ that you could see the rocks at the bottom, had become __________ with sediment after the night's storm.

Possible Answers:

lucid . . . turgid

limpid . . . turbid

benign . . . opaque

luminous . . . torpid

clear . . . mercurial

Correct answer:

limpid . . . turbid

Explanation:

For the first blank, we need an adjective that means "clear" and applies to liquids. While "lucid," "limpid," "luminous," and "clear" all sound like potential correct answers, "lucid" means expressed clearly or easy to understand and refers to ideas or texts, and "luminous" means reflecting or emitting light. This leaves us with "clear" and "limpid," which describes liquids and means free of anything that darkens; completely clear, as potential answers. So, we need to pick between "mercurial" and "turbid" for the second blank, which needs an adjective describing the river's cloudiness after the storm. Since "turbid" refers to liquids and means cloudy, opaque, or thick with suspended matter, it is the better choice, and the answer is "limpid . . . turbid."

Example Question #4 : Two Adjectives Or Adverbs In Two Blank Texts

Choose the word or set of words that, when inserted into the sentence, best completes the sentence.

The young monk was finally fed up with the __________ actions of his confrère, whose sweet-seeming piety was a mask for a judgmental, indeed __________, attitude.

 

Possible Answers:

sanctimonious . . . acrid

hidden . . . outlandish

questionable . . . ostentatious

clandestine . . . unquestionable

two-faced . . . equivocal

Correct answer:

sanctimonious . . . acrid

Explanation:

The key phrase is the intensifying "indeed . . ." Here, the only option is "acrid," which can mean not only bitter and angry, but also sarcastic in tone. The first word, "sanctimonious," fits as well, for it indicates being showy with one's holiness—from the Latin word sanctus, whence we derive other words like "sancity" and "sanctify."

← Previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 12 13
Learning Tools by Varsity Tutors

Incompatible Browser

Please upgrade or download one of the following browsers to use Instant Tutoring: