GRE Subject Test: Literature in English : Aristotelian Criticism

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for GRE Subject Test: Literature in English

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Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Aristotelian Criticism

Passage adapted from Samuel Johnson, "Preface to Shakespeare (1756)," 9-63, in Johnson on Shakespeare: Essays and Notes Selected and Set Forth with an Introduction by Walter Raleigh (London: Oxford University Press, 1969): 29.

"Whether Shakespeare knew the unities, and rejected them by design, or deviated from them by happy ignorance, it is, I think, impossible to decide, and useless to enquire. We may reasonably suppose, that, when he rose to notice, he did not want the counsels and admonitions of scholars and criticks, and that he at last deliberately persisted in a practice, which he might have begun by chance."

Which of the following is NOT one of the "unities" alluded to in the above excerpt?

Possible Answers:

Unity of Time

Unity of Place

Unity of Action

Unity of Language

Correct answer:

Unity of Language

Explanation:

The three Classical Unities (also known as Aristotelian Unities) that formed the basis of much 17th and 18th century dramatic and literary criticism were: Unity of Time, Unity of Place, and Unity of Action.

  

Passage adapted from Samuel Johnson, "Preface to Shakespeare (1756)," 9-63, in Johnson on Shakespeare: Essays and Notes Selected and Set Forth with an Introduction by Walter Raleigh (London: Oxford University Press, 1969): 29.

All GRE Subject Test: Literature in English Resources

1 Diagnostic Test 158 Practice Tests Question of the Day Flashcards Learn by Concept
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