GED Social Studies : Reconstruction Policies

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for GED Social Studies

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Example Questions

Example Question #35 : United States History

Jim Crow Laws were designed to __________

Possible Answers:

enforce segregation of whites and blacks in the Reconstruction-era South.

help ease returning veterans back into American society after World War Two.

provide funding for affirmative action programs during and after the Civil Rights Era.

prevent women from voting or holding office prior to the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment.

improve the condition of poor black families’ living standards during the early twentieth century.

Correct answer:

enforce segregation of whites and blacks in the Reconstruction-era South.

Explanation:

Jim Crow Laws were designed to enforce racial segregation of whites and blacks in the Reconstruction-era South. They were also designed to try and prevent blacks from voting or from achieving social mobility. Most of the Jim Crow Laws were in effect for much of the second half of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth century.

Example Question #33 : United States History

The Reconstruction period of American history occurred __________

Possible Answers:

in the decades after the Civil War.

after the end of World War One.

after the end of the War of 1812.

during the Cold War.

during and immediately after the Great Depression.

Correct answer:

in the decades after the Civil War.

Explanation:

The Reconstruction period of American history occurred in the decades after the Civil War. It is named after the attempts by the United States government not only to reconstruct the internal infrastructure and industry of the nation, but also to "reconstruct" the feeling of unity and solidarity between the North and the South. It is a period of time marked by existing intense sectionalism and racial segregation.

Example Question #37 : United States History

Whose Presidential veto overturned the Wade-Davis Bill?

Possible Answers:

Ulysses S. Grant's

Abraham Lincoln's

Millard Fillmore's

Andrew Jackson's

Andrew Johnson's

Correct answer:

Abraham Lincoln's

Explanation:

The Wade-Davis Bill was proposed by radical Republicans in 1864, when it was becoming clear that the Confederacy was going to lose the Civil War. The Wade-Davis Bill represented an attempt to make it more difficult, and more humiliating, for the states of former Confederate politicians to reintegrate themselves into the Union. The Bill was opposed by Abraham Lincoln, who favored a ten-percent plan, which required only ten-percent of those who had voted in 1860 to swear allegiance to the Union government. Lincoln felt that the Wade-Davis Bill would hinder the development of positive relationships between the North and South and so employed his veto.

Example Question #34 : United States History

Following the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson became President of the United States. What was the nature of his relationship with the radical Republicans in Congress?

Possible Answers:

Positive; the radical Republicans favored the President’s policy of punishing the Confederacy and making reintegration humiliating.

Negative; the radical Republicans disagreed on how easily to reintegrate the South into the Union.

Positive; the radical Republicans helped the President integrate the former Confederacy smoothly.

Neutral; the radical Republicans worked with the President on some occasions, but there was little enthusiastic support.

Positive; the radical Republicans helped the President integrate the former Confederacy smoothly.

Neutral; the radical Republicans worked with the President on some occasions, but there was little enthusiastic support.

Positive; the radical Republicans favored the President’s policy of punishing the Confederacy and making reintegration humiliating.

Negative; the radical Republicans favored maintaining a strong army and spending a large amount of the budget on arms and soldiers.

Correct answer:

Negative; the radical Republicans disagreed on how easily to reintegrate the South into the Union.

Explanation:

Given that Andrew Johnson was the first President to be impeached (his trial famously failed to convict in the Senate by one vote) and that radical Republicans controlled the House after the Civil War, it is obvious that their relationship would have been negative. The radical Republicans wanted harsh terms imposed on the former Confederate states, whereas Johnson favored reintegrating smoothly and easily. The disagreement between the two groups led to the impeachment of Andrew Johnson in 1867.

Example Question #39 : United States History

Which of these proposed bills attempted to enforce strict terms of reentrance into the Union on former Confederate states and politicians, but was vetoed by Abraham Lincoln?

Possible Answers:

The Wilmot Proviso

The Ten-Percent Plan

The Wade-Davis Bill

The G.I. Bill

The Gadsden Purchase

Correct answer:

The Wade-Davis Bill

Explanation:

The Wade-Davis Bill was proposed by two radical republicans in 1864 in an attempt to make readmittance into the Union very challenging and humiliating for former Confederates. Under the plan, the Union army would take control of enforcing the end of slavery, and any Confederate politician who wanted to reenter Union political life would have to swear both complete loyalty and that he or she had never been personally culpable for encouraging rebellion during the Civil War.

Example Question #1 : Reconstruction Policies

The First Transcontinental Railroad was completed in which year?

Possible Answers:

1911

1901

1881

1824

1869

Correct answer:

1869

Explanation:

During the second half of the nineteenth century, the United States engaged in a massive railroad construction project. This linked communities over vast distances for the first time in American history. The First Transcontinental Railroad was built between 1863 and 1869 and finished in 1869, with the initial first destination being San Francisco.

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