GED Social Studies : Order of Events and Processes

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for GED Social Studies

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Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Order Of Events And Processes

The following question refers to the information contained in this passage.

The Federal Reserve is the central banking system of the United States. The roles of the Federal Reserve include regulating the monetary policy and supply, preventing financial panics, and supervising banking institutions. The Federal Reserve was created early in the twentieth century primarily in response to the frequent financial panics that would cripple the U.S. economy, most prominent of which was the Panic of 1907. The powers of the Federal Reserve have expanded throughout the years, usually in response to other financial disasters like the Great Depression. Recent evidence suggests the Federal Reserve is essentially powerless to prevent the destabilizing force that is our boom and bust economy.

Why was the Federal Reserve created?

Possible Answers:

To provide additional funds to the American government

To ensure that America paid off its international debts

To try to prevent financial panic

To regulate the United States’ monetary supply

To regulate the United States’ monetary policy

Correct answer:

To try to prevent financial panic

Explanation:

In this passage, the author directly states that "the Federal Reserve was created early in the twentieth century primarily in response to the frequent financial panics that would cripple the U.S. economy." Throughout the passage, the author comments on how the primary role of the Federal Reserve is to keep the financial market and economy stable—and to prevent panics and depressions.

Example Question #2 : Order Of Events And Processes

Adapted from A Smaller History of Greece from the Earliest Times to the Roman Conquest by William Smith (1897)

During the sixth century before the common era, three other national festivals—the Pythian, Nemean, and Isthmian games—which were at first only local became open to the whole nation. The Pythian games were celebrated in every third Olympic year, on the Cirrhaean plain in Phocis, under the superintendence of the Amphictyons. The games consisted not only of matches in gymnastics and of horse and chariot races, but also of contests in music and poetry. They soon acquired celebrity, and became second only to the great Olympic festival. The Nemean and Isthmian games occurred more frequently than the Olympic and Pythian. They were celebrated once in two years—the Nemean in the valley of Nemea between Phlius and Cleonae—and the Isthmian by the Corinthians, on their isthmus, in honor of Poseidon (Neptune). As in the Pythian festival, contests in music and in poetry, as well as gymnastics and chariot-races, formed part of these games. Although the four great festivals of which we have been speaking had no influence in promoting the political union of Greece, they nevertheless were of great importance in making the people feel that they were all members of one family, and in cementing them together by common sympathies and the enjoyment of common pleasures. The frequent occurrence of these festivals, for one was celebrated every gear, tended to the same result. The Greeks were thus annually reminded of their common origin.

The Greeks competed in games involving __________.

Possible Answers:

poetry

chariot racing

athletic feats

All of the other answer choices are correct.

music

Correct answer:

All of the other answer choices are correct.

Explanation:

The author also notes how ancient Greeks competed in games "not only of matches in gymnastics and of horse and chariot races, but also of contests in music and poetry." So, the correct answer is that all of the provided answer options that list things that could potentially be included in the games were included.

Example Question #3 : Order Of Events And Processes

Adapted from A Short History of the United States (1908) by Edward Channing.

The war was over. But the future of the American nation was still uncertain. Indeed, one can hardly say that there was an American nation in 1783. While the war lasted, a sense of danger bound together the people of the different states. But as soon as this peril ceased, their old jealousies and self-seekings came back. There was no national government to smooth over these differences and to compel the states to act justly toward one another. There was, indeed, the Congress of the Confederation, but it is absurd to speak of it as a national government.

The Continental Congress began drawing up the Articles of Confederation in June, 1776. But there were long delays, and each month's delay made it more impossible to form a strong government. It fell out in this way that the Congress of the Confederation had no real power. It could not make a state or an individual pay money or do anything at all. In the course of a few years, Congress asked the states to give it over six million dollars to pay the debts and expenses of the United States. It received about a million dollars and was fortunate to get that.

What gave the states a sense of unity during the Revolutionary War? 

Possible Answers:

Common political beliefs

Interdependence on one another for food and production

Common religious beliefs

Common economic principles

A shared sense of danger

Correct answer:

A shared sense of danger

Explanation:

The author of this passage tells you that "While the war lasted, a sense of danger bound together the people of the different states," and that after the war they no longer had this shared need to protect one another. 

Example Question #4 : Order Of Events And Processes

Adapted from A Smaller History of Greece from the Earliest Times to the Roman Conquest (1897) by William Smith.

Greece is the southern portion of a great peninsula of Europe, washed on three sides by the Mediterranean Sea. It is bounded on the north by the Cambunian mountains, which separate it from Macedonia. It extends from the fortieth degree of latitude to the thirty-sixth, its greatest length being not more than 250 English miles, and its greatest breadth only 180. Its surface is considerably less than that of Portugal. This small area was divided among a number of independent states, many of them containing a territory of only a few square miles, and none of them larger than an English county. But the heroism and genius of the Greeks have given an interest to the insignificant spot of earth bearing their name, which the vastest empires have never equalled.

The name of Greece was not used by the inhabitants of the country. They called their land Hellas, and themselves Hellenes. At first the word Hellas signified only a small district in Thessaly, from which the Hellenes gradually spread over the whole country. The names of Greece and Greeks come to us from the Romans, who gave the name of Graecia to the country and of Graeci to the inhabitants.

From whom did the name of Greece enter the English language? 

Possible Answers:

The French

The Romans

The Spanish

The Macedonians

The Greeks

Correct answer:

The Romans

Explanation:

The author tells you that the Greeks called their own country "Hellas" and themselves "Hellenes." He also tells you that "The names of Greece and Greeks come to us from the Romans, who gave the name of Graecia to the country."

Example Question #5 : Order Of Events And Processes

Adapted from Independent Bohemia by Vladimir Nosek (1918)

The Czechs freely elected the Habsburgs to the throne of Bohemia, which remained a fully independent state, its alliance with Austria and Hungary being purely dynastic. But soon the Habsburgs began to violate the liberties of Bohemia that they were bound by oath to observe, and this led finally to the fateful Czech revolution of 1618. At the battle of the White Mountain in 1620, the Czechs suffered a defeat and were cruelly punished for their rebellion. All their nobility were either executed or sent into exile, and their property confiscated. The country was devastated by the imperial hordes, and its population was reduced from 3,000,000 to 800,000 during the Thirty Years' War.

In 1627 Ferdinand II greatly curtailed the administrative rights of Bohemia, yet he did not dare to deprive her entirely of her independence. In his "Renewed Ordinance of the Land," Ferdinand declared the Bohemian crown to be hereditary in the House of Habsburg, and reserved legislative power to the sovereign. But otherwise the historical rights of Bohemia remained valid, notwithstanding all subsequent arbitrary centralizing measures taken by the Habsburgs. Bohemia's rights were repeatedly recognized by each succeeding Habsburg. Legally, Bohemia is an independent state today.

According to the author of this passage, what was the most direct cause of the Czech revolution? 

Possible Answers:

The end of the Thirty Years' War

Plague and famine in the year preceding

The execution of the Bohemian nobles

The Habsburg rulers violating the rights and freedoms of Bohemia

The outbreak of the Thirty Years' War

Correct answer:

The Habsburg rulers violating the rights and freedoms of Bohemia

Explanation:

The author tells you that first the Habsburgs were freely elected as rulers of the Czech people, but that shortly after they came to power, the Habsburgs began to "violate the liberties of Bohemia that they were bound by oath to observe" and that this in turn "led finally to the fateful Czech revolution of 1618." So, it is clear that according to the author, the most direct cause of the Czech revolution was the violation of rights and freedoms in Bohemia. 

Example Question #6 : Order Of Events And Processes

The following question refers to the information contained in this passage.

The feudal system arose during the Dark Ages of European history. After the fall of the western Roman Empire in the fifth century, there was a massive power vacuum in central and western Europe. This vacuum that was swiftly filled by invading barbarian tribes and settlers from further East. Wave after wave of people arrived in the fertile lands of central and western Europe and encouraged those who lived there either to seek protection or perish at the hands of the endless hordes of migrating people. This need for protection created the feudal system. A common family would pledge to work the lands of a Lord or Knight, and that person would in turn promise to defend the family whenever the land was invaded. This grew into a system fairly close to slavery, called serfdom, where the common man had no choice but to toil endlessly to further someone else’s wealth or perish out in the wider world by himself. It was born out of the violence and mass migration of the Early Dark Ages.

The Dark Ages began _________________.

Possible Answers:

before the rise of the Roman Empire

after the fall of the Roman Empire

when feudalism took over Europe

during the height of the Roman Empire

after feudalism was overthrown in Europe

Correct answer:

after the fall of the Roman Empire

Explanation:

The author tells you that "the feudal system arose during the Dark Ages of European history. After the fall of the western Roman Empire in the fifth century, there was a massive power vacuum in central and western Europe." Thus, the Dark Ages arose following the fall of the Roman Empire, as the power vacuum created by the absence of the Romans led to massive migrations of people.

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