GED Language Arts (RLA) : Transitions

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for GED Language Arts (RLA)

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Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Transitions

What transition word or phrase best fits the blank below?

______________ some pundits believe global warming is a hoax, nearly all scientific experts agree that climate change is a very real and exigent threat.

Possible Answers:

Not to mention

Meanwhile

Seeing that

Although

Because

Correct answer:

Although

Explanation:

The correct relationship between the two parts of these sentences is one of contrast. “Because” and “Seeing that” imply causation (i.e. pundits’ disbelief leads to experts’ agreement), which is not logical. “Not to mention” implies agreement or similarity.” “Meanwhile” correctly implies a sort of contrast, but it does not fit the grammatical construction of the sentence.

Example Question #81 : Language Usage And Grammar

What transition word or phrase best fits the blank below?

Many marriage counsellors suggest that open communication ________________  an active acceptance of imperfection leads to a healthy, vital partnership.

Possible Answers:

in light of

in addition to

in spite of

after all

especially

Correct answer:

in addition to

Explanation:

The relationship between “open communication” and “an active acceptance of imperfection” is one of agreement, so “in addition to” is the best choice. “In light of” incorrectly implies that the “open communication” is subordinate to “active acceptance,” and “in spite of” incorrectly implies contrast. “After all” and “especially” are both transitional phrases, but neither fits the grammatical construction of the sentence.

Example Question #3 : Syntax

What transition word or phrase best fits the blank below?

Other relationship experts counsel that having high standards, _________________ accepting poor behavior, is the secret to a long and happy marriage.

Possible Answers:

moreover

as well as

while also

not

correspondingly

Correct answer:

not

Explanation:

“Having high standards” and “accepting poor behavior” are directly opposed ideas, so we need a contrasting transition: “not.” “While also” suggests that the two ideas should coexist at the same time, but that is not logical in the context of the sentence. “As well as” and “moreover” incorrectly suggest addition. “Indeed” suggests emphasis and is both semantically and syntactically wrong.

Example Question #4 : Syntax

What transition word or phrase best fits the blank below?

Meredith wasn’t sure whether her physician had ordered the correct tests, ________________ she had a sneaking suspicion that she should consult a specialist instead.

Possible Answers:

but

in spite of

concomitantly

correspondingly

whereas

Correct answer:

but

Explanation:

Meredith’s uncertainty is being contrasted with her sneaking suspicion here, so a contrasting word or phrase will be necessary to properly express the meaning of the sentence. (The appearance of “instead” in the sentence is a further hint that we’re looking for a contrast word.) “In spite of” and “whereas” are contrast phrases, but they’re the wrong part of speech for the sentence. “But” is the best choice here.

Example Question #5 : Syntax

What transition word or phrase best fits the blank below?

The corporate stalemate is being caused by greedy managers and recalcitrant employees alike; __________________, it is critical for both groups to work together.

Possible Answers:

meanwhile

conversely

however

as such

yet

Correct answer:

as such

Explanation:

Based on the content of this sentence, we need a transition that expresses a sentiment like “For this reason” or “therefore.” In other words, we need a conclusion word or phrase. “As such” is the only choice among these answers that provides conclusion.

Example Question #2 : Transitions

Scuba diving is a risky hobby; _____________, it remains popular with amateurs and experts alike.

Possible Answers:

heretofore

in other words

above all

nevertheless

consummately

Correct answer:

nevertheless

Explanation:

Here, the idea of the hobby’s riskiness is contrasted with its widespread appeal. Thus, a contrasting word is necessary: “nevertheless.” None of the other choices here express a relationship of contrast.

Example Question #83 : Language Usage And Grammar

Friedrich Nietzsche is best known as a preeminent German philosopher; _______________, he was also a poet and a scholar of ancient Greek and Latin.

Possible Answers:

however

moreover

in particular

henceforth

to paraphrase

Correct answer:

however

Explanation:

Here, we’re contrasting Nietzsche’s best and lesser known attributes. The only word of contrast among these choices is “however.” “To paraphrase” and “in particular” imply further illustration or support. “Moreover” implies addition of something similar, and “henceforth” implies addition of something new at a later time.

Example Question #84 : Language Usage And Grammar

Writers often anthropomorphize or personify animals in literature; ________________, Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book (1894) ascribes human characteristics to a variety of wild animals.

Possible Answers:

firstly

for example

simultaneously

thus

nevertheless

Correct answer:

for example

Explanation:

The second half of this sentence introduces an example to support the claim in the first half of the sentence. “For example” is therefore the best transition word to segue between these two parts of the sentence. (“Nevertheless” implies contrast, “simultaneously” implies something happening at the same moment in time, “firstly” implies a sequence of examples instead of just one, and “thus” implies conclusion.)

Example Question #3 : Transitions

____________________ his growing perturbation, Jim managed to remain calm when his professor changed the requirements of the homework assignment yet again.

Possible Answers:

Given

Because of

Despite

As a result of

In case of

Correct answer:

Despite

Explanation:

“Despite” or “in spite of” is the best fit for this sentence, which is again a relationship of contrast: Jim’s perturbation or agitation is opposed to his outwardly calm appearance. “Because of,” “given,” “in case of,” and “as a result of” all imply causality, which does not make sense in this context.

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