Common Core: 7th Grade Math : Approximate the Probability of a Chance Event by Collecting Data: CCSS.Math.Content.7.SP.C.6

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for Common Core: 7th Grade Math

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Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Approximate The Probability Of A Chance Event By Collecting Data: Ccss.Math.Content.7.Sp.C.6

loaded coin is tossed  times, with the result being heads  times. Based on this observation, what is the probability that the next toss of this coin will be tails?

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

The probability of an event based on observation (empirical probability) can be calculated by dividing the number of times the event occurs by the number of trials total. Since there were  trials and  heads, there were  tails.

The probability of tails is therefore given by the number of tails divided by the total number of trials. Both terms are divisible by , allowing us to simplify the fraction.

Example Question #2 : Approximate The Probability Of A Chance Event By Collecting Data: Ccss.Math.Content.7.Sp.C.6

If John were to roll a die  times, roughly how many times would he roll a 

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

A die has  sides, with each side displaying a number between 

Let's first determine the probability of rolling a  after John rolls the die a single time.

There is a total of  sides on a die and only one value of  on one side; thus, our probability is:

This means that roughly  of John's rolls will be a ; therefore, in order to calculate the probability we can multiply  by —the number of times John rolls the die.

If John rolls a die  times, then he will roll a  roughly  times. 

Example Question #3 : Approximate The Probability Of A Chance Event By Collecting Data: Ccss.Math.Content.7.Sp.C.6

If John were to roll a die  times, roughly how many times would he roll a 

 

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

A die has  sides, with each side displaying a number between 

Let's first determine the probability of rolling a  after John rolls the die a single time.

There is a total of  sides on a die and only one value of  on one side; thus, our probability is:

This means that roughly  of John's rolls will be a ; therefore, in order to calculate the probability we can multiply  by —the number of times John rolls the die.

If John rolls a die  times, then he will roll a  roughly  times. 

Example Question #4 : Approximate The Probability Of A Chance Event By Collecting Data: Ccss.Math.Content.7.Sp.C.6

If John were to roll a die  times, roughly how many times would he roll a  or a 

 

 

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

A die has  sides, with each side displaying a number between 

Let's first determine the probability of rolling a  or a  after John rolls the die a single time.

There is a total of  sides on a die and we have one value of  and one value of ; thus, our probability is:

This means that roughly  of John's rolls will be a  or a ; therefore, in order to calculate the probability we can multiply  by —the number of times John rolls the die.

If John rolls a die  times, then he will roll a  or a  roughly  times. 

Example Question #5 : Approximate The Probability Of A Chance Event By Collecting Data: Ccss.Math.Content.7.Sp.C.6

If John were to roll a die  times, roughly how many times would he roll a  or a 

 

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

A die has  sides, with each side displaying a number between 

Let's first determine the probability of rolling a  or a  after John rolls the die a single time.

There is a total of  sides on a die and we have one value of  and one value of ; thus, our probability is:

This means that roughly  of John's rolls will be a  or a ; therefore, in order to calculate the probability we can multiply  by —the number of times John rolls the die.

If John rolls a die  times, then he will roll a  or a  roughly  times. 

Example Question #6 : Approximate The Probability Of A Chance Event By Collecting Data: Ccss.Math.Content.7.Sp.C.6

If John were to roll a die  times, roughly how many times would he roll an even number?

 

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

A die has  sides, with each side displaying a number between 

Let's first determine the probability of rolling an even number after John rolls the die a single time.

There is a total of  sides on a die and  even numbers: ; thus, our probability is:

This means that roughly  of John's rolls will be an even number; therefore, in order to calculate the probability we can multiply  by —the number of times John rolls the die.

If John rolls a die  times, then he will roll an even number roughly  times. 

Example Question #7 : Approximate The Probability Of A Chance Event By Collecting Data: Ccss.Math.Content.7.Sp.C.6

If John were to roll a die  times, roughly how many times would he roll an odd number?

 

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

A die has  sides, with each side displaying a number between 

Let's first determine the probability of rolling an odd number after John rolls the die a single time.

There is a total of  sides on a die and  odd numbers: ; thus, our probability is:

This means that roughly  of John's rolls will be an odd number; therefore, in order to calculate the probability we can multiply  by —the number of times John rolls the die.

If John rolls a die  times, then he will roll an odd number roughly  times. 

Example Question #8 : Approximate The Probability Of A Chance Event By Collecting Data: Ccss.Math.Content.7.Sp.C.6

If John were to roll a die  times, roughly how many times would he roll a , a , or a 

 

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

A die has  sides, with each side displaying a number between 

Let's first determine the probability of rolling a , a , or a  after John rolls the die a single time.

There is a total of  sides on a die and we have one value of , one value of  and one value of ; thus, our probability is:

This means that roughly  of John's rolls will be a , or a ; therefore, in order to calculate the probability we can multiply  by —the number of times John rolls the die.

If John rolls a die  times, then he will roll a , or a  roughly  times. 

Example Question #9 : Approximate The Probability Of A Chance Event By Collecting Data: Ccss.Math.Content.7.Sp.C.6

If John were to roll a die  times, roughly how many times would he roll an odd number or a 

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

A die has  sides, with each side displaying a number between 

Let's first determine the probability of rolling an odd number or a  after John rolls the die a single time.

There is a total of  sides on a die and  odd numbers:  and one ; thus, our probability is:

This means that roughly  of John's rolls will be an odd number or a ; therefore, in order to calculate the probability we can multiply  by —the number of times John rolls the die.

If John rolls a die  times, then he will roll an odd number or a  roughly  times. 

Example Question #10 : Approximate The Probability Of A Chance Event By Collecting Data: Ccss.Math.Content.7.Sp.C.6

If John were to roll a die  times, roughly how many times would he roll an even number or a 

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

A die has  sides, with each side displaying a number between 

Let's first determine the probability of rolling an even number or a  after John rolls the die a single time.

There is a total of  sides on a die and  even numbers:  and one ; thus, our probability is:

This means that roughly  of John's rolls will be an even number or a ; therefore, in order to calculate the probability we can multiply  by —the number of times John rolls the die.

If John rolls a die  times, then he will roll an even number or a  roughly  times. 

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