Common Core: 7th Grade English Language Arts : Determine Figurative and Connotative Word Meanings and Their Textual Effects and the Impact of Sound Repetition in a Specific Part of Poetry: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.7.4

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for Common Core: 7th Grade English Language Arts

varsity tutors app store varsity tutors android store

All Common Core: 7th Grade English Language Arts Resources

1 Diagnostic Test 27 Practice Tests Question of the Day Flashcards Learn by Concept

Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Determine Figurative And Connotative Word Meanings And Their Textual Effects And The Impact Of Sound Repetition In A Specific Part Of Poetry: Ccss.Ela Literacy.Rl.7.4

Adapted from Little Women by Louisa M. Alcott (1880)

Margaret, the eldest of the four, was sixteen, and very pretty, being plump and fair, with large eyes, plenty of soft, brown hair, a sweet mouth, and white hands, of which she was rather vain. Fifteen-year-old Jo was very tall, thin, and brown, and reminded one of a colt; for she never seemed to know what to do with her long limbs, which were very much in her way. She had a decided mouth, a comical nose, and sharp, gray eyes, which appeared to see everything, and were by turns fierce, funny, or thoughtful. Her long, thick hair was her one beauty; but it was usually bundled into a net, to be out of her way. Round shoulders had Jo, big hands and feet, a fly-away look to her clothes, and the uncomfortable appearance of a girl who was rapidly shooting up into a woman, and didn't like it. Elizabeth—or Beth, as every one called her—was a rosy, smooth-haired, bright-eyed girl of thirteen, with a shy manner, a timid voice, and a peaceful expression, which was seldom disturbed. Her father called her "Little Tranquillity," and the name suited her excellently; for she seemed to live in a happy world of her own, only venturing out to meet the few whom she trusted and loved. Amy, though the youngest, was a most important person,—in her own opinion at least. A regular snow-maiden, with blue eyes, and yellow hair, curling on her shoulders, pale and slender, and always carrying herself like a young lady mindful of her manners. What the characters of the four sisters were we will leave to be found out.

The clock struck six; and, having swept up the hearth, Beth put a pair of slippers down to warm. Somehow the sight of the old shoes had a good effect upon the girls; for mother was coming, and every one brightened to welcome her. Meg stopped lecturing, and lighted the lamp, Amy got out of the easy-chair without being asked, and Jo forgot how tired she was as she sat up to hold the slippers nearer to the blaze.

"They are quite worn out; Marmee must have a new pair."

"I thought I'd get her some with my dollar," said Beth.

"No, I shall!" cried Amy.

"I'm the oldest," began Meg, but Jo cut in with a decided—

"I'm the man of the family now papa is away, and I shall provide the slippers, for he told me to take special care of mother while he was gone."

"I'll tell you what we'll do," said Beth; "let's each get her something for Christmas, and not get anything for ourselves."

"That's like you, dear! What will we get?" exclaimed Jo.

Every one thought soberly for a minute; then Meg announced, as if the idea was suggested by the sight of her own pretty hands, "I shall give her a nice pair of gloves."

"Army shoes, best to be had," cried Jo.

"Some handkerchiefs, all hemmed," said Beth.

"I'll get a little bottle of cologne; she likes it, and it won't cost much, so I'll have some left to buy my pencils," added Amy.

 

Why did Beth's father call her "Little Tranquility"? 

Possible Answers:

Beth's father called her "Little Tranquility" because she looked happy. 

Beth's father called her "Little Tranquility" because she looked peaceful.

Beth's father called her "Little Tranquility" because she looked mad. 

Beth's father called her "Little Tranquility" because she looked sad. 

Correct answer:

Beth's father called her "Little Tranquility" because she looked peaceful.

Explanation:

To answer this question, we need to locate the part of the passage where the author describes Beth and think about what the word "tranquility" means. 

"Elizabeth—or Beth, as every one called her—was a rosy, smooth-haired, bright-eyed girl of thirteen, with a shy manner, a timid voice, and a peaceful expression, which was seldom disturbed. Her father called her "Little Tranquillity," and the name suited her excellently; for she seemed to live in a happy world of her own, only venturing out to meet the few whom she trusted and loved." 

Before we are told that Beth's father called her "Little Tranquility", we are told that Beth was shy and had a peaceful expression. Tranquil means to be quiet and peaceful; so, given our answer choices, "Beth's father called her "Little Tranquility" because she looked peaceful" is the best option. 

Example Question #2 : Determine Figurative And Connotative Word Meanings And Their Textual Effects And The Impact Of Sound Repetition In A Specific Part Of Poetry: Ccss.Ela Literacy.Rl.7.4

Adapted from Little Women by Louisa M. Alcott (1880)

Margaret, the eldest of the four, was sixteen, and very pretty, being plump and fair, with large eyes, plenty of soft, brown hair, a sweet mouth, and white hands, of which she was rather vain. Fifteen-year-old Jo was very tall, thin, and brown, and reminded one of a colt; for she never seemed to know what to do with her long limbs, which were very much in her way. She had a decided mouth, a comical nose, and sharp, gray eyes, which appeared to see everything, and were by turns fierce, funny, or thoughtful. Her long, thick hair was her one beauty; but it was usually bundled into a net, to be out of her way. Round shoulders had Jo, big hands and feet, a fly-away look to her clothes, and the uncomfortable appearance of a girl who was rapidly shooting up into a woman, and didn't like it. Elizabeth—or Beth, as every one called her—was a rosy, smooth-haired, bright-eyed girl of thirteen, with a shy manner, a timid voice, and a peaceful expression, which was seldom disturbed. Her father called her "Little Tranquillity," and the name suited her excellently; for she seemed to live in a happy world of her own, only venturing out to meet the few whom she trusted and loved. Amy, though the youngest, was a most important person,—in her own opinion at least. A regular snow-maiden, with blue eyes, and yellow hair, curling on her shoulders, pale and slender, and always carrying herself like a young lady mindful of her manners. What the characters of the four sisters were we will leave to be found out.

The clock struck six; and, having swept up the hearth, Beth put a pair of slippers down to warm. Somehow the sight of the old shoes had a good effect upon the girls; for mother was coming, and every one brightened to welcome her. Meg stopped lecturing, and lighted the lamp, Amy got out of the easy-chair without being asked, and Jo forgot how tired she was as she sat up to hold the slippers nearer to the blaze.

"They are quite worn out; Marmee must have a new pair."

"I thought I'd get her some with my dollar," said Beth.

"No, I shall!" cried Amy.

"I'm the oldest," began Meg, but Jo cut in with a decided—

"I'm the man of the family now papa is away, and I shall provide the slippers, for he told me to take special care of mother while he was gone."

"I'll tell you what we'll do," said Beth; "let's each get her something for Christmas, and not get anything for ourselves."

"That's like you, dear! What will we get?" exclaimed Jo.

Every one thought soberly for a minute; then Meg announced, as if the idea was suggested by the sight of her own pretty hands, "I shall give her a nice pair of gloves."

"Army shoes, best to be had," cried Jo.

"Some handkerchiefs, all hemmed," said Beth.

"I'll get a little bottle of cologne; she likes it, and it won't cost much, so I'll have some left to buy my pencils," added Amy.

 

Based on the passage, select the word that most accurately describes the sisters. 

Possible Answers:

Tired

Selfish

Happy

Selfless

Correct answer:

Selfless

Explanation:

Most of this passage is about the girls discussing getting a gift for their mother. They have decided instead of getting gifts for each other, or using their money on themselves, they will use their money to do something nice for their mother. 

Let's look at our answer choices: 

Selfless means to care or worry about someone else, as opposed to yourself. 

Selfish means to care for yourself, no one else. 

Tired means to be sleepy. 

Happy means to be excited about something. 

Based on these definitions, and what we know from the text, "selfless" is the best answer choice. 

Example Question #3 : Determine Figurative And Connotative Word Meanings And Their Textual Effects And The Impact Of Sound Repetition In A Specific Part Of Poetry: Ccss.Ela Literacy.Rl.7.4

"Sonnet 18" by William Shakespeare

1        Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
2        Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
3        Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
4        And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
5        Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
6        And often is his gold complexion dimmed,
7        And every fair from fair sometime declines,
8        By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed:
9        But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
10      Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
11      Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
12      When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st,
13      So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
14      So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

Which of the following lines provides direct evidence that in the phrase “eternal lines,” “lines” references the lines of the poem itself?

Possible Answers:

"Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, / And summer's lease hath all too short a date:” (Lines 3–4)

“Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,” (Line 11)

"Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, / And often is his gold complexion dimmed," (Lines 5–6)

“So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, / So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.” (Lines 13–14)

“And every fair from fair sometime declines, / By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed:” (Lines 7–8)

Correct answer:

“So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, / So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.” (Lines 13–14)

Explanation:

Part of the poem's conclusion involves a complex reference that Shakespeare makes in Line 12:

9        But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
10      Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
11      Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
12      When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st,

What are these "eternal lines"? The question tells us that one interpretation is that they refer to the lines of the poem itself. We need to pick out which line in the poem provides evidence supporting this reading. Lines 3–4 ("Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, / And summer's lease hath all too short a date:”) have no relation to these "lines," and neither do Lines 7–8 (“And every fair from fair sometime declines, / By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed:”). Line 11 (“Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,”) is nearer where these "lines" are mentioned but doesn't provide any evidence supporting the claim that they refer to the lines of the poem itself. Consider Lines 13–14, though:

13      So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
14      So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

"This" seems to refer to the poem itself; that makes sense, given Line 13's claim that the speaker will "live" in one sense as long as "men can breathe and eyes can see," both things necessary for reading. Let's trace this out a little bit more: if the speaker "lives" as long as the poem is around for people to read, then the speaker's claim that death won't get to brag about the poem's addressee "[wandering] in his shade" makes more sense. The speaker says that death won't get to brag in this way "When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st," so it makes sense that these "eternal lines" are the poem, the same thing that the speaker references with the word "this" in the poem's last line. The correct answer is Lines 13–14.

All Common Core: 7th Grade English Language Arts Resources

1 Diagnostic Test 27 Practice Tests Question of the Day Flashcards Learn by Concept
Learning Tools by Varsity Tutors

Incompatible Browser

Please upgrade or download one of the following browsers to use Instant Tutoring: