Common Core: 5th Grade English Language Arts : Determine the Meaning of Words and Phrases, Including Figurative Language: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.4

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for Common Core: 5th Grade English Language Arts

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All Common Core: 5th Grade English Language Arts Resources

1 Diagnostic Test 25 Practice Tests Question of the Day Flashcards Learn by Concept

Example Questions

Example Question #9 : Common Core: 5th Grade English Language Arts

Adapted from "The Brook" by Alfred Lord Tennyson in Volume V. Nature of The World's Best Poetry (1904)

Come from haunts of coot and hern,
I make a sudden sally,
And sparkle out among the fern,
To bicker down a valley.

By thirty hills I hurry down,
Or slip between the ridges,
By twenty thorps, a little town,
And half a hundred bridges.

Till last by Philip's farm I flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on forever.

I chatter over stony ways,
In little sharps and trebles,
I bubble into eddying bays,
I babble on the pebbles.

With many a curve my banks I fret
by many a field and fallow,
And many a fairy foreland set
With willow-weed and mallow.

I chatter, chatter, as I flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on forever.

I wind about, and in and out,
with here a blossom sailing,
And here and there a lusty trout,
And here and there a grayling,

And here and there a foamy flake
Upon me, as I travel
With many a silver water-break
Above the golden gravel,

And draw them all along, and flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on forever.

I steal by lawns and grassy plots,
I slide by hazel covers;
I move the sweet forget-me-nots
That grow for happy lovers.

I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance,
Among my skimming swallows;
I make the netted sunbeam dance
Against my sandy shallows.

I murmur under moon and stars
In brambly wildernesses;
I linger by my shingly bars;
I loiter round my cresses;

And out again I curve and flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on forever.

Which of the following is the most accurate summary of what is going on in the poem’s underlined line, “I babble on the pebbles”?

Possible Answers:

A small river makes bubbling noises as it travels over pebbles.

A poet drones on while describing pebbles in another poem.

A speaker adds pebbles to something he or she is building.

A tourist excitedly describes pebbles to a fellow traveler.

Correct answer:

A small river makes bubbling noises as it travels over pebbles.

Explanation:

To answer this question correctly, you need to figure out who the speaker is in the poem and what they mean by "babble on the pebbles." The poem's speaker uses the pronoun "I," so the poem uses first-person perspective. The poem consists of a list of things the speaker says he or she does. A lot of these actions involve movement through nature: "bicker down a valley" (Line 4), "By thirty hills I hurry down" (Line 5), and "I steal by lawns and grassy plots" (Line 37) are all examples of this. The poem is called "The Brook." A "brook" is a small river, and this is the perspective from which the poem is presented. When the speaker says, "I babble on the pebbles," the poet is using personification to say that the small river sounds like it is "babbling," or talking nonsensically, as it moves over pebbles. The correct answer is, "A small river makes bubbling noises as it travels over pebbles."

All Common Core: 5th Grade English Language Arts Resources

1 Diagnostic Test 25 Practice Tests Question of the Day Flashcards Learn by Concept
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