Common Core: 5th Grade English Language Arts : Compare and Contrast Stories in the Same Genre: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.9

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Example Question #1 : Compare And Contrast Stories In The Same Genre: Ccss.Ela Literacy.Rl.5.9

Passage 1: Passage and illustrations adapted from "How Sun, Moon, and Wind Went Out to Dinner" in Indian Fairy Tales (1892; ed. Joseph Jacobs, illus. John D. Batten)

Image "Common Core Fifth Grade CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.9 - Compare and Contrast Stories in the Same Genre - Image 1" adapted from "How Sun, Moon, and Wind Went Out to Dinner" in Indian Fairy Tales (ed. Joseph Jacobs, illustrator John D. Batten, 1892 ed.).

Image "Common Core Fifth Grade CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.9 - Compare and Contrast Stories in the Same Genre - Image 2” adapted from "How Sun, Moon, and Wind Went Out to Dinner" in Indian Fairy Tales (ed. Joseph Jacobs, illustrator John D. Batten, 1892 ed.).

Common core fifth grade ccss.ela literacy.rl.5.9   compare and contrast stories in the same genre   image 1

Common core fifth grade ccss.ela literacy.rl.5.9   compare and contrast stories in the same genre   image 2ne day Sun, Moon, and Wind went out to dine with their uncle and aunts Thunder and Lightning. Their mother (one of the most distant Stars you see far up in the sky) waited alone for her children's return.

Now both Sun and Wind were greedy and selfish. They enjoyed the great feast that had been prepared for them, without a thought of saving any of it to take home to their mother—but the gentle Moon did not forget her. Of every dainty dish that was brought round, she placed a small portion under one of her beautiful long finger-nails, that Star might also have a share in the treat.

On their return, their mother, who had kept watch for them all night long with her little bright eye, said, "Well, children, what have you brought home for me?" Then Sun (who was eldest) said, "I have brought nothing home for you. I went out to enjoy myself with my friends—not to fetch a dinner for my mother!" And Wind said, "Neither have I brought anything home for you, mother. You could hardly expect me to bring a collection of good things for you, when I merely went out for my own pleasure." But Moon said, "Mother, fetch a plate, see what I have brought you." And shaking her hands she showered down such a choice dinner as never was seen before.

Then Star turned to Sun and spoke thus, "Because you went out to amuse yourself with your friends, and feasted and enjoyed yourself, without any thought of your mother at home—you shall be cursed. Henceforth, your rays shall ever be hot and scorching, and shall burn all that they touch. And men shall hate you, and cover their heads when you appear."

(And that is why the Sun is so hot to this day.)

Then she turned to Wind and said, "You also who forgot your mother in the midst of your selfish pleasures—hear your doom. You shall always blow in the hot dry weather, and shall parch and shrivel all living things. And men shall detest and avoid you from this very time."

(And that is why the Wind in the hot weather is still so disagreeable.)

But to Moon she said, "Daughter, because you remembered your mother, and kept for her a share in your own enjoyment, from henceforth you shall be ever cool, and calm, and bright. No noxious glare shall accompany your pure rays, and men shall always call you 'blessed.'"

(And that is why the moon's light is so soft, and cool, and beautiful even to this day.)

 

- - - - - - - - - -

 

Passage 2: Adapted from "Why the Sun and the Moon Live in the Sky" in Folk Stories from Southern Nigeria, West Africa by Elphinstone Dayrell (1910)

Many years ago the sun and water were great friends, and both lived on the earth together. The sun very often used to visit the water, but the water never returned his visits. At last the sun asked the water why it was that he never came to see him in his house, the water replied that the sun's house was not big enough, and that if he came with his people he would drive the sun out.

He then said, "If you wish me to visit you, you must build a very large compound; but I warn you that it will have to be a tremendous place, as my people are very numerous, and take up a lot of room."

The sun promised to build a very big compound, and soon afterwards he returned home to his wife, the moon, who greeted him with a broad smile when he opened the door. The sun told the moon what he had promised the water, and the next day commenced building a huge compound in which to entertain his friend.

When it was completed, he asked the water to come and visit him the next day.

When the water arrived, he called out to the sun, and asked him whether it would be safe for him to enter, and the sun answered, "Yes, come in, my friend."

The water then began to flow in, accompanied by the fish and all the water animals.

Very soon the water was knee-deep, so he asked the sun if it was still safe, and the sun again said, "Yes," so more water came in.

When the water was level with the top of a man's head, the water said to the sun, "Do you want more of my people to come?" and the sun and moon both answered, "Yes," not knowing any better, so the water flowed on, until the sun and moon had to perch themselves on the top of the roof.

Again the water addressed the sun, but receiving the same answer, and more of his people rushing in, the water very soon overflowed the top of the roof, and the sun and moon were forced to go up into the sky, where they have remained ever since.

Both passages’ stories include the Sun and the Moon as characters, but they are different characters in each story. In the story told in Passage 1, the characters Sun and Moon are __________. In the story told in Passage 2, the characters Sun and Moon are __________.

Possible Answers:

mother and daughter . . . father and son

siblings . . . a married couple

a married couple . . . siblings

father and son . . . mother and daughter

Correct answer:

siblings . . . a married couple

Explanation:

To answer this question correctly, we need to analyze the characters of sun and the moon in each story individually. While the sun and the moon are characters in each story, that does not mean that they are the exact same characters represented in both stories. They are different characters, with different personalities, who do act in different ways. Specifically, this question asks us to figure out how the characters of the sun and the moon are connected to one another in each story.

In Passage 1, the first paragraph provides all the information we need to figure out how the sun and the moon are related to one another.

One day Sun, Moon, and Wind went out to dine with their uncle and aunts Thunder and Lightning. Their mother (one of the most distant Stars you see far up in the sky) waited alone for her children's return.

This paragraph tells us that Sun and Moon have the same mother, a star. This means that they are brother and sister, or siblings.

In Passage 2, the first sentence of the third paragraph tells us how the sun and the moon are associated.

The sun promised to build a very big compound, and soon afterwards he returned home to his wife, the moon, who greeted him with a broad smile when he opened the door.

The sun's wife is the moon, so they are a married couple. Putting what we've learned from our analysis into the form of a single answer choice, the correct answer is "siblings . . . a married couple." Make sure not to mix up the order of the passages—doing so means that you could analyze them correctly, but get the question wrong!

Example Question #2 : Compare And Contrast Stories In The Same Genre: Ccss.Ela Literacy.Rl.5.9

Passage 1: Passage and illustrations adapted from "How Sun, Moon, and Wind Went Out to Dinner" in Indian Fairy Tales (1892; ed. Joseph Jacobs, illus. John D. Batten)

Image "Common Core Fifth Grade CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.9 - Compare and Contrast Stories in the Same Genre - Image 1" adapted from "How Sun, Moon, and Wind Went Out to Dinner" in Indian Fairy Tales (ed. Joseph Jacobs, illustrator John D. Batten, 1892 ed.).

Image "Common Core Fifth Grade CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.9 - Compare and Contrast Stories in the Same Genre - Image 2" adapted from "How Sun, Moon, and Wind Went Out to Dinner" in Indian Fairy Tales (ed. Joseph Jacobs, illustrator John D. Batten, 1892 ed.).

Common core fifth grade ccss.ela literacy.rl.5.9   compare and contrast stories in the same genre   image 1

Common core fifth grade ccss.ela literacy.rl.5.9   compare and contrast stories in the same genre   image 2ne day Sun, Moon, and Wind went out to dine with their uncle and aunts Thunder and Lightning. Their mother (one of the most distant Stars you see far up in the sky) waited alone for her children's return.

Now both Sun and Wind were greedy and selfish. They enjoyed the great feast that had been prepared for them, without a thought of saving any of it to take home to their mother—but the gentle Moon did not forget her. Of every dainty dish that was brought round, she placed a small portion under one of her beautiful long finger-nails, that Star might also have a share in the treat.

On their return, their mother, who had kept watch for them all night long with her little bright eye, said, "Well, children, what have you brought home for me?" Then Sun (who was eldest) said, "I have brought nothing home for you. I went out to enjoy myself with my friends—not to fetch a dinner for my mother!" And Wind said, "Neither have I brought anything home for you, mother. You could hardly expect me to bring a collection of good things for you, when I merely went out for my own pleasure." But Moon said, "Mother, fetch a plate, see what I have brought you." And shaking her hands she showered down such a choice dinner as never was seen before.

Then Star turned to Sun and spoke thus, "Because you went out to amuse yourself with your friends, and feasted and enjoyed yourself, without any thought of your mother at home—you shall be cursed. Henceforth, your rays shall ever be hot and scorching, and shall burn all that they touch. And men shall hate you, and cover their heads when you appear."

(And that is why the Sun is so hot to this day.)

Then she turned to Wind and said, "You also who forgot your mother in the midst of your selfish pleasures—hear your doom. You shall always blow in the hot dry weather, and shall parch and shrivel all living things. And men shall detest and avoid you from this very time."

(And that is why the Wind in the hot weather is still so disagreeable.)

But to Moon she said, "Daughter, because you remembered your mother, and kept for her a share in your own enjoyment, from henceforth you shall be ever cool, and calm, and bright. No noxious glare shall accompany your pure rays, and men shall always call you 'blessed.'"

(And that is why the moon's light is so soft, and cool, and beautiful even to this day.)

 

- - - - - - - - - -

 

Passage 2: Adapted from "Why the Sun and the Moon Live in the Sky" in Folk Stories from Southern Nigeria, West Africa by Elphinstone Dayrell (1910)

Many years ago the sun and water were great friends, and both lived on the earth together. The sun very often used to visit the water, but the water never returned his visits. At last the sun asked the water why it was that he never came to see him in his house, the water replied that the sun's house was not big enough, and that if he came with his people he would drive the sun out.

He then said, "If you wish me to visit you, you must build a very large compound; but I warn you that it will have to be a tremendous place, as my people are very numerous, and take up a lot of room."

The sun promised to build a very big compound, and soon afterwards he returned home to his wife, the moon, who greeted him with a broad smile when he opened the door. The sun told the moon what he had promised the water, and the next day commenced building a huge compound in which to entertain his friend.

When it was completed, he asked the water to come and visit him the next day.

When the water arrived, he called out to the sun, and asked him whether it would be safe for him to enter, and the sun answered, "Yes, come in, my friend."

The water then began to flow in, accompanied by the fish and all the water animals.

Very soon the water was knee-deep, so he asked the sun if it was still safe, and the sun again said, "Yes," so more water came in.

When the water was level with the top of a man's head, the water said to the sun, "Do you want more of my people to come?" and the sun and moon both answered, "Yes," not knowing any better, so the water flowed on, until the sun and moon had to perch themselves on the top of the roof.

Again the water addressed the sun, but receiving the same answer, and more of his people rushing in, the water very soon overflowed the top of the roof, and the sun and moon were forced to go up into the sky, where they have remained ever since.

Both Passage 1 and Passage 2 are folktales that __________.

Possible Answers:

explain parts of nature

suggest readers always be kind to their parents

explain how certain animals gained certain traits

encourage readers to have big houses so they can have lots of guests over

Correct answer:

explain parts of nature

Explanation:

This structure of this question tells you that both folktales do something, but the question itself asks you to figure out what this is. Considering each answer choice and figuring out if it is incorrect can help you narrow down your answer choices to the correct one. If one of the passages does the thing listed in an answer choice but the other doesn't, that answer choice isn't correct. The answer choice has to apply to both passages.

Does each passage "suggest readers always be kind to their parents"? Passage 1 does this, because it tells a story in which a character who brings food back from a dinner to her mother is rewarded, but characters who do not bring their mother any food are punished. Passage 2 does not make this suggestion, though. None of the characters are specified as the parents of other characters. This answer choice isn't correct.

Does each passage "encourage readers to have big houses so they can have lots of guests over"? Passage 2 has to do with large houses and guests, and Passage 1 has to do with guests, but never mentions houses at all. This answer choice isn't correct either.

Now we need to pick between the two remaining answer choices. Does each story "explain how certain animals gained certain traits"? No, it does not. Animals aren't mentioned in Passage 1 at all, and Passage 2 only mentions "fish and sea creatures" as accompanying the water on a visit. It doesn't explain how any of those fish or sea creatures gained certain traits.

The correct answer is that each story "explains parts of nature." The story told in Passage 1 is a folktale that explains why the sun is hot, hot wind isn't pleasant, and the moon's light is pretty. Passage 2 is a folk tale that explains "Why the Sun and the Moon Live in the Sky," as the title states.

Example Question #2 : Compare And Contrast Stories In The Same Genre: Ccss.Ela Literacy.Rl.5.9

Passage 1: Passage and illustrations adapted from "How Sun, Moon, and Wind Went Out to Dinner" in Indian Fairy Tales (1892; ed. Joseph Jacobs, illus. John D. Batten)

Image "Common Core Fifth Grade CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.9 - Compare and Contrast Stories in the Same Genre - Image 1" adapted from "How Sun, Moon, and Wind Went Out to Dinner" in Indian Fairy Tales (ed. Joseph Jacobs, illustrator John D. Batten, 1892 ed.).

Image "Common Core Fifth Grade CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.9 - Compare and Contrast Stories in the Same Genre - Image 2" adapted from "How Sun, Moon, and Wind Went Out to Dinner" in Indian Fairy Tales (ed. Joseph Jacobs, illustrator John D. Batten, 1892 ed.).

Common core fifth grade ccss.ela literacy.rl.5.9   compare and contrast stories in the same genre   image 1

Common core fifth grade ccss.ela literacy.rl.5.9   compare and contrast stories in the same genre   image 2ne day Sun, Moon, and Wind went out to dine with their uncle and aunts Thunder and Lightning. Their mother (one of the most distant Stars you see far up in the sky) waited alone for her children's return.

Now both Sun and Wind were greedy and selfish. They enjoyed the great feast that had been prepared for them, without a thought of saving any of it to take home to their mother—but the gentle Moon did not forget her. Of every dainty dish that was brought round, she placed a small portion under one of her beautiful long finger-nails, that Star might also have a share in the treat.

On their return, their mother, who had kept watch for them all night long with her little bright eye, said, "Well, children, what have you brought home for me?" Then Sun (who was eldest) said, "I have brought nothing home for you. I went out to enjoy myself with my friends—not to fetch a dinner for my mother!" And Wind said, "Neither have I brought anything home for you, mother. You could hardly expect me to bring a collection of good things for you, when I merely went out for my own pleasure." But Moon said, "Mother, fetch a plate, see what I have brought you." And shaking her hands she showered down such a choice dinner as never was seen before.

Then Star turned to Sun and spoke thus, "Because you went out to amuse yourself with your friends, and feasted and enjoyed yourself, without any thought of your mother at home—you shall be cursed. Henceforth, your rays shall ever be hot and scorching, and shall burn all that they touch. And men shall hate you, and cover their heads when you appear."

(And that is why the Sun is so hot to this day.)

Then she turned to Wind and said, "You also who forgot your mother in the midst of your selfish pleasures—hear your doom. You shall always blow in the hot dry weather, and shall parch and shrivel all living things. And men shall detest and avoid you from this very time."

(And that is why the Wind in the hot weather is still so disagreeable.)

But to Moon she said, "Daughter, because you remembered your mother, and kept for her a share in your own enjoyment, from henceforth you shall be ever cool, and calm, and bright. No noxious glare shall accompany your pure rays, and men shall always call you 'blessed.'"

(And that is why the moon's light is so soft, and cool, and beautiful even to this day.)

 

- - - - - - - - - -

 

Passage 2: Adapted from "Why the Sun and the Moon Live in the Sky" in Folk Stories from Southern Nigeria, West Africa by Elphinstone Dayrell (1910)

Many years ago the sun and water were great friends, and both lived on the earth together. The sun very often used to visit the water, but the water never returned his visits. At last the sun asked the water why it was that he never came to see him in his house, the water replied that the sun's house was not big enough, and that if he came with his people he would drive the sun out.

He then said, "If you wish me to visit you, you must build a very large compound; but I warn you that it will have to be a tremendous place, as my people are very numerous, and take up a lot of room."

The sun promised to build a very big compound, and soon afterwards he returned home to his wife, the moon, who greeted him with a broad smile when he opened the door. The sun told the moon what he had promised the water, and the next day commenced building a huge compound in which to entertain his friend.

When it was completed, he asked the water to come and visit him the next day.

When the water arrived, he called out to the sun, and asked him whether it would be safe for him to enter, and the sun answered, "Yes, come in, my friend."

The water then began to flow in, accompanied by the fish and all the water animals.

Very soon the water was knee-deep, so he asked the sun if it was still safe, and the sun again said, "Yes," so more water came in.

When the water was level with the top of a man's head, the water said to the sun, "Do you want more of my people to come?" and the sun and moon both answered, "Yes," not knowing any better, so the water flowed on, until the sun and moon had to perch themselves on the top of the roof.

Again the water addressed the sun, but receiving the same answer, and more of his people rushing in, the water very soon overflowed the top of the roof, and the sun and moon were forced to go up into the sky, where they have remained ever since.

Hospitality is a theme of each of these stories. In Passage 1, __________ host(s) guests at an event. In Passage 2, __________ invite(s) guests over.

Possible Answers:

Thunder and Lightning . . . the Sun

The Sun . . . Thunder and Lightning

The Moon . . . a Star

A Star . . . the Moon

Correct answer:

Thunder and Lightning . . . the Sun

Explanation:

We can answer this question by asking the same question of each story: which character or characters is/are doing the inviting in each story? This question is made more complicated by the fact that certain natural objects (e.g. the sun and moon) are featured as characters in each of the stories; however, the stories are distinct, and the character of the sun in Passage 1's story is a different character than the character of the sun in Passage 2's story! It's important to keep the stories distinct as you answer this question so you don't accidentally mix them up and select an incorrect answer.

In Passage 1's opening paragraph, we learn that it's Thunder and Lightning who invite other characters to an event:

One day Sun, Moon, and Wind went out to dine with their uncle and aunts Thunder and Lightning. Their mother (one of the most distant Stars you see far up in the sky) waited alone for her children's return.

In Passage 2, we need to read further into the story before we encounter characters inviting other characters over as guests. We find that this occurs in the fourth paragraph, though:

When it was completed, he asked the water to come and visit him the next day.

Who does "he" refer to at this point in the story? Let's look at the line with the preceding line:

The sun told the moon what he had promised the water, and the next day commenced building a huge compound in which to entertain his friend.

When it was completed, he asked the water to come and visit him the next day.

Aha—here, "he" refers to the sun. So, the sun invites the water over as a guest in Passage 2.

Based on our analysis of each passage, the correct answer is that in Passage 1, Thunder and Lightning host guests at an event, and in Passage 2, the Sun invite(s) guests over ("Thunder and Lightning . . . the Sun)."

All Common Core: 5th Grade English Language Arts Resources

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