Common Core: 5th Grade English Language Arts : Analyze Text as Structure of Parts and Whole: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.5.5

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for Common Core: 5th Grade English Language Arts

varsity tutors app store varsity tutors android store

All Common Core: 5th Grade English Language Arts Resources

1 Diagnostic Test 25 Practice Tests Question of the Day Flashcards Learn by Concept

Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Analyze Text As Structure Of Parts And Whole: Ccss.Ela Literacy.Rl.5.5

Passage 2: Adapted from "Why the Sun and the Moon Live in the Sky" in Folk Stories from Southern Nigeria, West Africa by Elphinstone Dayrell (1910)

Many years ago the sun and water were great friends, and both lived on the earth together. The sun very often used to visit the water, but the water never returned his visits. At last the sun asked the water why it was that he never came to see him in his house, the water replied that the sun's house was not big enough, and that if he came with his people he would drive the sun out.

He then said, "If you wish me to visit you, you must build a very large compound; but I warn you that it will have to be a tremendous place, as my people are very numerous, and take up a lot of room."

The sun promised to build a very big compound, and soon afterwards he returned home to his wife, the moon, who greeted him with a broad smile when he opened the door. The sun told the moon what he had promised the water, and the next day commenced building a huge compound in which to entertain his friend.

When it was completed, he asked the water to come and visit him the next day.

When the water arrived, he called out to the sun, and asked him whether it would be safe for him to enter, and the sun answered, "Yes, come in, my friend."

The water then began to flow in, accompanied by the fish and all the water animals.

Very soon the water was knee-deep, so he asked the sun if it was still safe, and the sun again said, "Yes," so more water came in.

When the water was level with the top of a man's head, the water said to the sun, "Do you want more of my people to come?" and the sun and moon both answered, "Yes," not knowing any better, so the water flowed on, until the sun and moon had to perch themselves on the top of the roof.

Again the water addressed the sun, but receiving the same answer, and more of his people rushing in, the water very soon overflowed the top of the roof, and the sun and moon were forced to go up into the sky, where they have remained ever since.

After the water comes to visit in this story, he asks the sun questions. What happens after each of these questions?

Possible Answers:

The sun invites the water to dinner, and he eats more and more of the sun’s food each time.

The sun says water can come in, and the water level rises in the house rises.

The sun invites the water to eat more and more, and it gets increasingly full and so eats less every time he is are invited to eat more.

The sun says that water has to leave, and the water level in the house lowers.

Correct answer:

The sun says water can come in, and the water level rises in the house rises.

Explanation:

To answer this question, we need to take a look at the part of the passage in which the water has come to visit and is asking the sun questions. The first question the water asks the sun occurs in the fifth paragraph.

When the water arrived, he called out to the sun, and asked him whether it would be safe for him to enter, and the sun answered, "Yes, come in, my friend."

What happens after this? This is what the question is asking.

The water then began to flow in, accompanied by the fish and all the water animals.

This result most closely matches the answer choice "The sun says the water can come in, and the water level rises in the house rises." Let's look at the other questions to see if this trend holds up.

Very soon the water was knee-deep, so he asked the sun if it was still safe, and the sun again said, "Yes," so more water came in.

When the water was level with the top of a man's head, the water said to the sun, "Do you want more of my people to come?" and the sun and moon both answered, "Yes," not knowing any better, so the water flowed on, until the sun and moon had to perch themselves on the top of the roof.

Again the water addressed the sun, but receiving the same answer, and more of his people rushing in, the water very soon overflowed the top of the roof, and the sun and moon were forced to go up into the sky, where they have remained ever since.

This pattern continues: every time the water asks if more of the water and his people can come into the sun's house, the sun says that this is fine. This results in the water level getting higher and higher until at the story's conclusion, it forces the sun and the moon up into the sky.

Example Question #2 : Analyze Text As Structure Of Parts And Whole: Ccss.Ela Literacy.Rl.5.5

Adapted from "The Brook" by Alfred Lord Tennyson in Volume V. Nature of The World's Best Poetry (1904)

Come from haunts of coot and hern,
I make a sudden sally,
And sparkle out among the fern,
To bicker down a valley.

By thirty hills I hurry down,
Or slip between the ridges,
By twenty thorps, a little town,
And half a hundred bridges.

Till last by Philip's farm I flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on forever.

I chatter over stony ways,
In little sharps and trebles,
I bubble into eddying bays,
I babble on the pebbles.

With many a curve my banks I fret
by many a field and fallow,
And many a fairy foreland set
With willow-weed and mallow.

I chatter, chatter, as I flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on forever.

I wind about, and in and out,
with here a blossom sailing,
And here and there a lusty trout,
And here and there a grayling,

And here and there a foamy flake
Upon me, as I travel
With many a silver water-break
Above the golden gravel,

And draw them all along, and flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on forever.

I steal by lawns and grassy plots,
I slide by hazel covers;
I move the sweet forget-me-nots
That grow for happy lovers.

I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance,
Among my skimming swallows;
I make the netted sunbeam dance
Against my sandy shallows.

I murmur under moon and stars
In brambly wildernesses;
I linger by my shingly bars;
I loiter round my cresses;

And out again I curve and flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on forever.

This poem consists mainly of repeated statements of “I” and then a verb. This repetition helps to create a poem that primarily __________.

Possible Answers:

attempts to persuade the reader of the speaker’s opinion

explains a technological process step by step

provides scenic description

compares and contrasts two perspectives

Correct answer:

provides scenic description

Explanation:

This question asks you to figure out what it is that the repetition described in the question does in the poem overall. The correct answer will describe the poem accurately. We can't say that the poem "attempts to persuade the reader of the speaker's opinion"; the "I" statements that it consists of don't present an opinion with which the reader can agree or disagree. The poem isn't about technology, so we also can't say that the repetition of "I" statements "explains a technological process step by step." The "I" statements present one perspective, but the poem never presents another perspective, so we can't say that the repetition of "I" statements "compares and contrasts two perspectives."

The correct answer is that the repetition of "I" statements helps the poem "[provide] scenic description." The "I" statements describe a brook's movements throughout a natural landscape, so the more "I" statements the reader encounters, the more detail about the landscape the poem provides him or her.

All Common Core: 5th Grade English Language Arts Resources

1 Diagnostic Test 25 Practice Tests Question of the Day Flashcards Learn by Concept
Learning Tools by Varsity Tutors

Incompatible Browser

Please upgrade or download one of the following browsers to use Instant Tutoring: