Common Core: 2nd Grade English Language Arts : Describe the Overall Structure of a Story: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.5

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for Common Core: 2nd Grade English Language Arts

varsity tutors app store varsity tutors android store

All Common Core: 2nd Grade English Language Arts Resources

2 Diagnostic Tests 51 Practice Tests Question of the Day Flashcards Learn by Concept

Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Describe The Overall Structure Of A Story: Ccss.Ela Literacy.Rl.2.5

Passage 1

Adapted from Little Cinderella (1858)

It happened that the king's son sent invitations to a ball, which was to last two nights, and to which all the great people of the land were invited, the two sisters among the rest. This delighted them extremely, and their thoughts were entirely occupied in selecting their most becoming dresses for the important occasion. Poor Cinderella had now more work to do than ever, as it was her business to iron their linen, and starch their ruffles. The sisters talked of nothing but preparations for the ball. The eldest said, “I shall wear my crimson-velvet dress, and point-lace;” and the younger, “I shall put on my usual dress-petticoat, a mantle embroidered with gold flowers, and a tiara of diamonds.“

They sent to engage the services of the most fashionable hairdresser. They also called Cinderella to their aid; for she had very good taste, and she offered, in the most amiable manner, to arrange their heads herself; of which offer they were only too happy to avail themselves. Whilst so occupied, the eldest said, “Cinderella, should you like to go to the ball?”

“Alas!” said she, “you are ridiculing me. I am not likely to go to the ball.”

“You are right,” replied the sister; “people would be amused to see a Cinderella there.”

Passage 2

Adapted from Cinderella by Henry W. Hewet (1855)

It happened that the king's son gave a ball, to which he invited all the nobility; and, as our two young ladies made a great figure in the world, they were included in the list of invitations. So they began to be very busy choosing what head-dress and which gown would be the most becoming. Here was fresh work for poor Cinderella: for it was she, forsooth, who was to starch and get up their ruffles, and iron all their fine linen; and nothing but dress was talked about for days together. "I," said the eldest, "shall put on my red velvet dress, with my point-lace trimmings." "And I," said the younger sister, "shall wear my usual petticoat, but shall set it off with my gold brocaded train and my circlet of diamonds."

They sent for a clever tire-woman to prepare the double rows of quilling for their caps, and they purchased a quantity of fashionably cut patches. They called in Cinderella to take her advice, as she had such good taste, and Cinderella not only advised them well, but offered to dress their hair, which they were pleased to accept. While she was thus busied, the sisters said to her: "And pray, Cinderella, would you like to go to the ball?"

"Nay, you are mocking me," replied the poor girl; "it is not for such as I to go to balls."

"True enough," rejoined they; "folks would laugh to see a Cinderella at a court ball."

What was the main topic of both passages? 

Possible Answers:

Why Cinderella wasn't invited to the ball

What the sisters were going to wear to the ball

Where the ball is being held

Who the sisters were going to go to the ball with

Correct answer:

What the sisters were going to wear to the ball

Explanation:

Both passages talk mainly about what the sisters are going to wear to the ball. The first sentence of both passages is about who is going to the ball, and the last sentences mention Cinderella not going to the ball. However, most of the text in the middle of the passages are about the dresses that the sisters are going to wear to the ball and having Cinderella help them get ready. 

Example Question #1 : Describe The Overall Structure Of A Story: Ccss.Ela Literacy.Rl.2.5

Adapted from "The Pig Brother" by Laura E. Richards (1908)

There was once a child who was untidy. He left his books on the floor, and his muddy shoes on the table; he put his fingers in the jam-pots, and spilled ink on his best pinafore; there was really no end to his untidiness.

One day the Tidy Angel came into his nursery.

“This will never do!” said the Angel. “This is really shocking. You must go out and stay with your brother while I set things to rights here.”

“I have no brother!” said the child.

“Yes, you have!” said the Angel. “You may not know him, but he will know you. Go out in the garden and watch for him, and he will soon come.”

“I don’t know what you mean!” said the child; but he went out into the garden and waited.

Presently a squirrel came along, whisking his tail.

“Are you my brother?” asked the child.

The squirrel looked him over carefully.

“Well, I should hope not!” he said. “My fur is neat and smooth, my nest is handsomely made, and in perfect order, and my young ones are properly brought up. Why do you insult me by asking such a question?”

He whisked off, and the child waited.

Presently a wren came hopping by.

“Are you my brother?” asked the child.

“No indeed!” said the wren. “What impertinence! You will find no tidier person than I in the whole garden. Not a feather is out of place, and my eggs are the wonder of all for smoothness and beauty. Brother, indeed!” He hopped off, ruffling his feathers, and the child waited.

By and by a large Tommy Cat came along.

“Are you my brother?” asked the child.

“Go and look at yourself in the glass,” said the Tommy Cat haughtily, “and you will have your answer. I have been washing myself in the sun all the morning, while it is clear that no water has come near you for a long time. There are no such creatures as you in my family, I am humbly thankful to say.”

He walked on, waving his tail, and the child waited.

Presently a pig came trotting along.

The child did not wish to ask the pig if he were his brother, but the pig did not wait to be asked.

“Hallo, brother!” he grunted.

“I am not your brother!” said the child.

“Oh, yes, you are!” said the pig. “I confess I am not proud of you, but there is no mistaking the members of our family. Come along, and have a good roll in the barnyard! There is some lovely black mud there.”

“I don’t like to roll in mud!” said the child.

“Tell that to the hens!” said the pig brother. “Look at your hands, and your shoes, and your pinafore! Come along, I say! You may have some of the pig-wash for supper, if there is more than I want.”

“I don’t want pig-wash!” said the child; and he began to cry.

Just then the Tidy Angel came out.

“I have set everything to rights,” she said, “and so it must stay. Now, will you go with the Pig Brother, or will you come back with me, and be a tidy child?”

“With you, with you!” cried the child; and he clung to the Angel’s dress.

The Pig Brother grunted.

“Small loss!” he said. “There will be all the more wash for me!” and he trotted on.

How does the story end? 

Possible Answers:

The pig becomes the boy's brother

The Tommy Cat becomes the boy's brother

The boy agrees to be more tidy

The Tidy Angle cleans the boy's room

Correct answer:

The boy agrees to be more tidy

Explanation:

At the end of the story, the boy tells the Tidy Angle that he doesn't want to be brothers with the pig, he would rather keep himself and his room clean. 

Just then the Tidy Angel came out.

“I have set everything to rights,” she said, “and so it must stay. Now, will you go with the Pig Brother, or will you come back with me, and be a tidy child?”

“With you, with you!” cried the child; and he clung to the Angel’s dress.

 

All Common Core: 2nd Grade English Language Arts Resources

2 Diagnostic Tests 51 Practice Tests Question of the Day Flashcards Learn by Concept
Learning Tools by Varsity Tutors

Incompatible Browser

Please upgrade or download one of the following browsers to use Instant Tutoring: