CLEP Humanities : Understanding Terminology That Describes Film

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for CLEP Humanities

varsity tutors app store varsity tutors android store

Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Understanding Terminology That Describes Film

A series of short scenes quickly edited together into a film to show condensed time is called __________.

Possible Answers:

drop in

freeze frame

montage

fade out

tracking shot

Correct answer:

montage

Explanation:

First developed in the Soviet Union in the 1920s, the montage originally referred simply to the instant cut between two different shots to show their relationship. Eventually, the term was broadened to refer to a compilation of short scenes that are edited together quickly to collapse time.

Example Question #2 : Understanding Terminology That Describes Film

A camera shot that follows a character or object through a series of rooms or locations is known as a __________.

Possible Answers:

tracking shot

dissolve

jump cut

deep focus

montage

Correct answer:

tracking shot

Explanation:

A "tracking shot" gets its name from the track set up to move the camera, attached to a dolly, throughout a set. This allows the camera to follow a character or an object across a scene, or between multiple locations. Tracking shots are used to move between locations in films.

Example Question #24 : Film

A film noir typically features all of the following elements EXCEPT __________.

Possible Answers:

low-key lighting

a criminal element to its storyline

use of a "femme fatale" character

mystery stories

epic length and scope in time and subject matter

Correct answer:

epic length and scope in time and subject matter

Explanation:

"Film noir" was an appellation given to certain Hollywood films of the 1940s and 50s by French critics at the time, only being used in America by critics decades laters. Called "melodramas" in their own publicity, these films grew out of hardboiled detective fiction, and featured an element of mystery, a detective character, criminal elements, and, usually, a femme fatale as the lead female character. The films were usually quite small, with storylines that took place in one city over a few days or weeks.

Example Question #3 : Understanding Terminology That Describes Film

In film production, a "voiceover" refers to __________.

Possible Answers:

the acting performance in an animated film

a narration or explanation not said by a character on screen

one actor completely speaking over another one

a musical piece laid underneath a scene of dialogue

a rerecording of an actor's dialogue

Correct answer:

a narration or explanation not said by a character on screen

Explanation:

A "voiceover" generally refers to the spoken part in a film that is not said by a character on screen or a by any character seen in the film. Usually, voiceover is used as a form of narration, to explain or comment on the action of the film in a way the characters cannot. Voiceover is commonly found in documentaries as a way to tie the film's story together in absence of a traditional narrative.

Example Question #4 : Understanding Terminology That Describes Film

A typical film reel displays how many individual frames per second?

Possible Answers:

10

24

48

12

1

Correct answer:

24

Explanation:

A film reel is actually a series of photographs, called frames, with the time between them being much less than one second. A typical frame rate for a film is 24 frames per second, a rate which makes the many different images appear to the human eye as one continuous, moving image. A typical human eye can process 10 separate images per second, and a frame rate must exceed this by enough to look like a constant shot of action.

Example Question #5 : Understanding Terminology That Describes Film

What is the term Alfred Hitchcock used for an object or goal a protagonist desires and that drives the plot of a film?

Possible Answers:

Deus ex machina

Quibble

MacGuffin

Femme fatale

Red herring

Correct answer:

MacGuffin

Explanation:

Alfred Hitchcock frequently featured characters pursuing a simple goal or object relentlessly in his films. However, what they were after was usually not important in the film's larger story by the time the film reached its conclusion. Hitchcock called such a device the "MacGuffin," a term he invented as well as helped to popularize.

Example Question #28 : Film

In film terminology, a "wipe" refers to __________.

Possible Answers:

a long camera shot that slowly zooms in to focus on one individual character

a transition between scenes where a line moves across the screen

a long camera shot that slowly backs out of focus on one individual character

the overdubbing of different voices for the actor on the screen

a quick edit between multiple shots and scenes

Correct answer:

a transition between scenes where a line moves across the screen

Explanation:

A "wipe" transition occurs when a visible line moves across the screen to provide the cut between two different scenes. A director can have a number of reasons for using a wipe to edit a film. In particular, it creates movement inside of a shot, and can show the continuity or a contrast between two scenes.

Example Question #29 : Film

What is the name of the film process that allowed black and white film stock to be made into color?

Possible Answers:

Kodachrome

Technicolor

Colorfasting

Panavision

Widescreen

Correct answer:

Technicolor

Explanation:

After moving picture film was possible, the film still had to be shot in black and white. Fairly early on in movie history, many different companies tried to create a color film process. While many were made, by far the most successful, to the point of being a near monopoly from the 1920s to the 1950s, was the Technicolor process used by the company of the same name.

Example Question #6 : Understanding Terminology That Describes Film

In a film, the cinematographer is in charge of what aspect of the production?

Possible Answers:

The financing

The camera work

The soundtrack

The screenplay

The acting

Correct answer:

The camera work

Explanation:

A cinematographer on a film shoot can be thought of as the head camera operator. On a large film, this means the cinematographer is in charge of placing all cameras, setting lighting appropriately, and physically filming the scenes. A cinematographer is as key to the look of a film as anyone else involved in the filmaking process.

Learning Tools by Varsity Tutors

Incompatible Browser

Please upgrade or download one of the following browsers to use Instant Tutoring: