AP World History : Gender 1750 to 1900

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for AP World History

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Example Questions

Example Question #12 : Gender

The process used during the Industrial Revolution in which textile work, such as wool sorting, was primarily done at home was known as what?

Possible Answers:

Private Practice

Child Labor

Homework

Domestic System

Correct answer:

Domestic System

Explanation:

The domestic system was aimed primarily at women. The idea was that women could help make money for the household while working at home. At this time the idea of women working in public positions was less widely accepted. This made it so women could work in the same industries as men. It also allowed businesses to cut down costs because they did not need to have space for these women to work in these textile operations.

Example Question #13 : Gender

Emmeline Pankhurst, Susan B Anthony, and Jane Addams were all key figures in what social movement?

Possible Answers:

Abolitionism

Gay Rights

Imperialism

Prohibition

Suffrage

Correct answer:

Suffrage

Explanation:

All three women were pivotal in the fight for equal voting rights in the USA and Great Britain. Emmeline Pankhurst and the British Suffragettes received the vote decades before American women. The British movement also employed violent tactics, while the American movement remained more peaceful.

Example Question #3 : Gender 1750 To 1900

Who wrote A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

Possible Answers:

Elizabeth Barret Browning

Mary Shelley

Mary Wollstonecraft

Jane Austen

Virginia Woolf

Correct answer:

Mary Wollstonecraft

Explanation:

Mary Wollstonecraft wrote A Vindication of Rights of Woman in 1792 at the height of the Enlightenment period. In this text, she argues that women are not naturally inferior to men, as was generally thought by people at the time, but rather appear that way because they are poorly educated and taught to be subservient.

Example Question #11 : Other Global Regions

The Taiping Rebellion was inspired by which of the following?

Possible Answers:

None of these answers inspired the Taiping Rebellion.

Equal rights for women 

All of these answers inspired the Taiping Rebellion.

Shared property 

Christianity 

Correct answer:

All of these answers inspired the Taiping Rebellion.

Explanation:

The Taiping Rebellion is the name given to a massive Civil War that was waged in China from 1850 to 1864. The Heavenly Kingdom of Taiping was led by a man who believed himself to be the younger brother of Jesus Christ. He, along with his followers, wanted to replace the religions and traditions of China with Christianity. The rebels were also inspired by equal rights for women, shared property, and an overthrow of existing moral and legal traditions. The rebellion was eventually crushed by the Qing government of China with the help of the French and the British.

Example Question #1 : Gender 1750 To 1900

Throughout the late nineteenth century, the Feminist movement in the Western world  __________.

Possible Answers:

was dominated by working-class families 

was supported by the federal governments of the United States and Britain 

was reinforced by women’s roles in World War’s One and Two 

was dominated by upper-class elites 

was encouraged by female European royalty

Correct answer:

was dominated by upper-class elites 

Explanation:

The Feminist movement in the Western world began to pick up steam toward the end of the Enlightenment era, highlighted by Mary Wollstonecraft’s 1792 essay titled A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. In the nineteenth century, the movement progressed slowly but steadily and was almost exclusively dominated by upper class elites (highlighted by the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention). It was almost constantly opposed by the federal governments of the United States and Britain, which of course were dominated exclusively by men. In the twentieth century, the expansion of the role of women during World War One greatly encouraged the movement towards female equality—a movement that is still ongoing.

Example Question #1 : Gender 1750 To 1900

Select the social activist who campaigned to allow women to enlist as soldiers in the pro-French Revolutionary forces.

Possible Answers:

Olympe de Gouges

Maximilien Robespierre

Edmund Burke

Charlotte Corday

Pauline Leon

Correct answer:

Pauline Leon

Explanation:

After the French Legislative Assembly declared war on Austria on April 20th, 1792, many Frenchwomen immediately began to campaign to be allowed to serve in the military. These women were led by the French social activist Pauline Léon, who personally authored a petition to the Legislative Assembly, seeking official permission to serve as soldiers fighting in defense of the Revolution. A stirring and fiery writer, Léon urged her fellow women to prove their worth by becoming soldiers or members of the National Guard. Léon was not alone in her desire; many Frenchwomen joined her campaign, writing passionate entreaties to the Assembly. But in spite of their requests, in 1793 the Assembly passed an official ban on women’s military service (most men disapproved of, or were outright skeptical, of women’s martial abilities). However, several women managed to infiltrate the ranks and fight in their country’s defense in defiance of the prohibition.

Example Question #5 : Gender 1750 To 1900

Select the French revolutionary thinker who wrote the Declaration of the Rights of Woman.

Possible Answers:

Marie Antoinette 

Clarie Lacombe 

Pauline Leon 

Charlotte Corday 

Olympe de Gouges 

Correct answer:

Olympe de Gouges 

Explanation:

Many French women strenuously objected to the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen’s and the new Constitution’s prohibitions against female political participation. Some of the most vehement criticisms of the new political structure were leveled by Olympe de Gouges, a celebrated playwright and proponent of the Revolution. De Gouges used her prodigious literary skills to her advantage by composing the Declaration of the Rights of Woman. A direct response to the Declaration of the Rights of Man, her version did far more than simply insert women into the written political equation; her treatise explicitly defined women as citizens of the nation, with political interests, ambitions, and passions of their own. She urged that women be allowed to hold political office, vote in elections, own property, and receive greater access to education.

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