AP Psychology : Social Motives

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for AP Psychology

varsity tutors app store varsity tutors android store

Example Questions

Example Question #1 : Social Motives

When a person's self-esteem is at stake, they have a tendency to compare themselves to others who are in even worse positions. This is a defensive technique known as __________.

Possible Answers:

downward social comparisons

reflected glory

None of these answers are correct

upward social comparisons

affiliation glory

Correct answer:

downward social comparisons

Explanation:

Downward social comparisons are defense mechanisms that present when people seek to preserve or defend their self-esteem. These mechanisms come in the form of comparing oneself to others who are worse off—less successful, less happy, or less fortunate.

Example Question #2 : Social Motives

What is the affiliation motive?

Possible Answers:

A need to be with others.

A need to avoid illness.

A need to pursue intellectual enlightenment.

A need to belong to a professional organization.

A need to feel excluded.

Correct answer:

A need to be with others.

Explanation:

The affiliation motive is a need to be involved with others. This need is heightened when people feel like celebrating or feel anxious.

Example Question #3 : Social Motives

Which of the following is an example of intrinsic motivation?

Possible Answers:

Grades 

Personal satisfaction

College credits

Salary

Correct answer:

Personal satisfaction

Explanation:

Personal satisfaction is an example of intrinsic motivation, since it is driven by internal rewards. 

Example Question #4 : Social Motives

Sam would like to try out for the school swim team. He enjoys swimming and would like the opportunity to spend time with like-minded peers; however, he is concerned about the time commitment and is worried that it will interfere with his after school job. According to Kurt Lewin's classification of conflicts, what type of conflict is Sam experiencing?

Possible Answers:

Avoidance-avoidance

ambivalent

Approach-approach

Multiple approach-avoidance

Approach-avoidance

Correct answer:

Approach-avoidance

Explanation:

Kurt Lewin classified conflicts based on whether they posed desirable or undesirable consequences. In an approach-approach conflict, a person is faced with two desirable options. For example, a person must choose between going to one of two restaurants that he enjoys. In an avoidance-avoidance conflict, a person is faced with two undesirable options. For example, a person has to decide between spending his afternoon cleaning or studying for an exam. In an approach-avoidance conflict, a person is faced with one option that has both desirable and undesirable consequences. In the case of this example, Sam is faced with both pros and cons associated with joining the swim team. In a multiple approach-avoidance conflict, there are several conflicts that pose both pros and cons. Last, the term ambivalent is not used in Lewin's classification. 

Learning Tools by Varsity Tutors

Incompatible Browser

Please upgrade or download one of the following browsers to use Instant Tutoring: