AP Human Geography : Green Revolution

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for AP Human Geography

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Example Questions

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Example Question #1 : Green Revolution

 

The Green Revolution resulted in an increase in production of cereal grains in the developing world, providing "cheap" calories for growing populations. By roughly what percent did cereal grain production increase throughout the course of the green revolution?

Possible Answers:

100%

75%

50%

200%

25%

Correct answer:

100%

Explanation:

During the Green Revolution, cereal grain production (and total caloric production for that matter) doubled, resulting in a 100% increase, one of the largest increases in food production in human history.

Example Question #2 : Green Revolution

During which decade in the twentieth century did the Green Revolution result in exponential increases in food production (particularly that of cereal grains) worldwide?

Possible Answers:

1960s

1970s

1930s

1940s

1950s

Correct answer:

1960s

Explanation:

While the process of synthesizing nitrogen fertilizers on an industrial scale had been around since the early twentieth century (e.g. the Haber-Bosch nitrogen fixation process, which was developed in 1909), this technology and infrastructure did not expand and become established in the developed world until the 1960s. This resulted in an increase of cheap and abundant cereal grains in famine-stricken countries.

Example Question #3 : Green Revolution

Which of the following was NOT a positive result of the Green Revolution?

Possible Answers:

Increased crop yields from industrial fertilizers

A global expansion of organic and sustainable agriculture

Increased crop yields from hybridized seed varieties

Increased abundance in cheap sources of calories, mostly rice and other cereal grains

A global increase in food security due to reduced crop failure

Correct answer:

A global expansion of organic and sustainable agriculture

Explanation:

The agricultural expansion and increases in food production achieved during the Green Revolution were the result of fertilizers synthesized on an industrial scale using fossil fuels. Traditional farming methods (e.g. organic methods that emphasized the use of natural fertilizers) were largely replaced across the world with commercial agriculture that relies heavily on industrial fertilizers derived from petroleum.

Example Question #4 : Green Revolution

Which of the following is the leading cause of hunger in the world in 2015?

Possible Answers:

War and political instability

Natural disasters

Lack of abundance

Crop failure

Human overpopulation

Correct answer:

War and political instability

Explanation:

Fortunately, our current food system has the capability to feed the entire human population, thanks in large part to chemical fertilizers. In addition, with improved transportation and commercialization of food, local crop failure and natural disasters pose less of a threat of famine then before industrialized agriculture. Currently, the leading cause of malnourishment worldwide is a result of war and government instability. A modern example of this is the displacement of subsistence farmers in the Darfur region of Sudan, who were capable of growing their own food for generations before their government waged war on their communities, resulting in their dependence on foreign aid.

Example Question #5 : Green Revolution

Which of the following is NOT a consequence of the global industrialization of agriculture initiated by the Green Revolution?

Possible Answers:

A dependence on fossil fuels to produce food and sustain the human population

The adoption of the "monoculture" farming method

An increase in energy investment of crops

Occasional, unpredictable, massive crop failures

Increase in pollution of watersheds worldwide by leaching of chemical fertilizers

Correct answer:

Occasional, unpredictable, massive crop failures

Explanation:

Some of the issues with the industrialization of agriculture include a high investment of fossil fuel energy to produce food, as well as the resulting pollution from fertilizer runoff and the widespread development of monocultures; however, increased use of pesticides and improvements in global food security have largely abated the threat of crop failures.

Example Question #6 : Green Revolution

Which of the following two points were the key driving forces behind the Green Revolution?

Possible Answers:

Agriculture expanding into arid and previously unarable regions and the resulting increase in irrigation systems and dependence on the water table.

An exponential increase in the human population and the advent of industrial fertilizers.

A global trend of consuming more plant-based foods and advances in horticultural science from public land grant colleges.

Human demand for cheap fast food like cheeseburgers and the creation of "perfect" crops by horticulturalists in public research colleges.

An exponential increase in the human population and the growing popularity of organic farming.

Correct answer:

An exponential increase in the human population and the advent of industrial fertilizers.

Explanation:

The Green Revolution was a response to an exponential increase in the global human population (from 2.5 billion in 1950 to 6 billion in 2000) and advances in technology that allowed for the mass production of chemical fertilizers (e.g. the development of the Haber-Bosch process). Previously, global agriculture was highly dependent on organic fertilizers such as mulch and animal/human manure, and dwindling nitrate deposits that had to be mined and transported.

Example Question #7 : Green Revolution

In what decade did the Green Revolution spread globally, saving an estimated one billion humans from starvation?

Possible Answers:

1920s

1950s

1960s

1940s

1930s

Correct answer:

1960s

Explanation:

The “Green Revolution” is a term used to describe a series of technological innovations in the field of agriculture that took place between the 1940s and the early 1970s. The Green Revolution began in Mexico where a collection of government bodies sponsored several initiatives designed to dramatically increase agricultural production in the country. When those initiatives proved successful they were implemented on a global scale. The Green Revolution has been credited with saving at least one billion humans from death by starvation.

Example Question #8 : Green Revolution

Most of the population growth spurred by the Green Revolution took place in __________.

Possible Answers:

Africa

North America

Europe

Asia

South America

Correct answer:

Asia

Explanation:

The Green Revolution took place in the mid-twentieth century. It is estimated that it led to a population increase of between one to two billion people. The majority of this population growth took place in Asia, particularly in countries like India, China, Vietnam, and Bangladesh.

Example Question #9 : Green Revolution

Which of these was not a negative consequence of the Green Revolution?

Possible Answers:

These were all negative consequences of the Green Revolution.

Increased focus on cash crops

Land speculation

Forced migration

None of these were negative consequences of the Green Revolution; the Green Revolution was exclusively positive.

Correct answer:

These were all negative consequences of the Green Revolution.

Explanation:

The Green Revolution took place during the middle of the twentieth century. It is the name given to a series of agricultural innovations that greatly increased the planet’s capacity for supporting human life. But, naturally, it had numerous negative consequences as well. The Green Revolution led to rampant land speculation and the forced migration of hundreds of millions of people, as traditional rural societies crumbled. It also led to the spread of multinational corporations that emphasized the growing of cash crops at the expense of nutritional crops which were needed to sustain poorer populations.

Example Question #31 : Development Of Agriculture

During the Green Revolution India increased its yields of wheat and rice by __________.

Possible Answers:

Correct answer:

Explanation:

During the Green Revolution countries all over Asia, Africa, and South America dramatically increased their yields of wheat and rice. In India this increase meant that fifty percent more rice and wheat was being produced in the 1980s when compared to the 1960s. This is a massive increase in the two staple crops that provide nutrition for the majority of the Indian population, and a large portion of the world’s population.

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