AP Biology : Understanding Connective Tissue

Study concepts, example questions & explanations for AP Biology

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Example Questions

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Example Question #1 : Understanding Connective Tissue

Which of the following comparisons of cartilage and bone is false?

Possible Answers:

Cartilage is avascular, while bone contains blood vessels

Cartilage is softer and more flexible than bone

Cartilage is non-innervated, while bone is innervated

Cartilage develops later into childhood, while bone forms the fetal skeleton

Correct answer:

Cartilage develops later into childhood, while bone forms the fetal skeleton

Explanation:

Cartilage, rather than bone, forms the fetal skeleton and is softer and more flexible than bone. Unlike cartilage, bone has both vascular and nervous networks running through it.

Example Question #1 : Understanding Connective Tissue

Which of the following is true of osteoblasts?

Possible Answers:

Osteoblasts are specialized cells that build bone

Osteoblasts can be inhibited when bound by parathyroid hormone (PTH)

All answers are correct

Osteoblasts can only function when in functional osteons

Correct answer:

All answers are correct

Explanation:

Osteoblasts contribute to the ossification process by working to build bone. They cannot do so as individual cells, but rather need to be arranged into osteons in the bone to function. Osteoblasts are regulated by a number of factors depending on the body's need for bone creation or resorption, including being inhibited by PTH.

Example Question #2 : Understanding Connective Tissue

Which of the following are types of connective tissue?

Possible Answers:

Adipose, cartilage, bone, blood

Adipose, neurons

Cartilage, bone, skin

Blood, neurons

Bone, blood, skin

Correct answer:

Adipose, cartilage, bone, blood

Explanation:

Tissues are groups of cells that can be grouped together and classified by their form and function. There are four major types of tissues: connective, epithelial, muscular, and nervous.

Connective tissue includes loose connective tissue, dense connective tissue, elastic connective tissue, reticular connective tissue, adipose (fat) tissue, cartilage, bone, lymph, and blood. Connective tissue can be identified as a loose arrangement of cells within an abundant extracellular matrix. The types of cells and composition of the matrix define the type of connective tissue. For example, the protein elastin is abundant in elastic connective tissue, while the protein collagen is abundant in cartilage and loose connective tissue. In blood, the matrix is composed of plasma. In bone, the matrix is composed of hydroxyapatite crystal.

Nervous tissue includes all types of neurons and neuroglia. These cells are specialized to transmit electrical signals and protect the transmission of these signals. Skin is composed of several layers of epithelium. Epithelial tissue is designed to form barriers between the body and the outside environment.

Example Question #4 : Understanding Connective Tissue

Which of the following is not a function of connective tissue?

Possible Answers:

Providing framework for the body

Protecting the body's internal organs

Transfer force between structures

Communicating pain sensation to the brain

Transporting molecules to muscle and other parts of the body

Correct answer:

Communicating pain sensation to the brain

Explanation:

Blood, bone, tendons, ligaments, and cartilage are all types of connective tissue. Bone and cartilage provide the framework for the body, as well as protect the internal organs of the body. Blood is responsible for transportation of oxygen and other nutrients throughout the body. Tendons transfer the force created by muscle tissue to the bones, allowing for movement.

Connective tissue is not responsible for communicating pain to the brain, as the sensation of pain is created by signals from the nervous system. The four types of tissue are connective, epithelial, muscular, and neural.

Example Question #3 : Understanding Connective Tissue

Bone, blood, ligaments, and cartilage are classified as which type of tissue?

Possible Answers:

Nervous tissue

Connective tissue

Muscle tissue

Embryonic tissue

Epithelial tissue

Correct answer:

Connective tissue

Explanation:

Connective tissue binds, supports, and fills spaces in the body. It consists of cells surrounded by an extracellular matrix. The make-up of this matrix is essential to defining the properties of the given connective tissue type. The extracellular matrix of blood is aqueous and filled with platelets and protein factors, while the matrix of bone is composed of hydroxyapatite crystal.

Example Question #6 : Understanding Connective Tissue

Where in the human body is connective tissue found?

Possible Answers:

Peripheral nervous system

Between other tissues throughout the body

Muscles

Lining of organs

Correct answer:

Between other tissues throughout the body

Explanation:

The connective tissue is found throughout the body in between other tissues and cell types. Connective tissue functions to both connect and separate the different tissue types.

Example Question #4 : Understanding Connective Tissue

Which of the following is not a component of connective tissue?

Possible Answers:

Ground substance

Skeletal muscles

Fibers

Adipocytes

Correct answer:

Skeletal muscles

Explanation:

Connective tissue has three main components: fibers, ground substance, and cells (fibroblasts, adipocytes, macrophages, mast cells, and leukocytes). Typically, connective tissue contains a relatively low proportion of cells, and a very high proportion of ground substance and fibrous proteins, such as collagen. Blood and lymph is sometimes considered a component of connective tissue as well.

Example Question #5 : Understanding Connective Tissue

What types of cells are a part of connective tissue?

Possible Answers:

All of these

Fibroblasts

Mast cells

Adipocytes

Correct answer:

All of these

Explanation:

Cells are also a critical component of connective tissue and are typically suspended in the ground substance. Cells that are a part of connective tissue include fibroblasts (cells that produce fibers), mast cells (involved in histamine-mediated inflammatory response), and adipocytes (fat cells). Staining methods can show these cell types within the connective tissue. Other connective tissue cells include osteocytes (bone cells), and chondrocytes (cartilage cells).

Example Question #831 : Ap Biology

What is the ground substance of the connective tissue?

Possible Answers:

An extracellular substance that supports fibers and cells

Water transported by xylem tissue in plants

An extracellular matrix suspending cells

An extracellular substance suspending fibers

Correct answer:

An extracellular matrix suspending cells

Explanation:

In connective tissues, ground substance is an extracellular matrix that suspends and supports cells. Ground substance does not contain fibers and is composed mostly of water and glycoproteins.

Example Question #832 : Ap Biology

Which of the following are fibers found in the connective tissue?

Possible Answers:

Elastic fibers

All of these

Collagenous fibers

Reticular fibers

Correct answer:

All of these

Explanation:

The connective tissue includes fibers that act as a matrix and support structure for cells suspended in ground substance. These fibers are categorized as collagenous fibers, elastic fibers, and reticular fibers. Collagenous fibers are the most abundant in the extracellular matrix, comprise tendons and ligaments, where play structural roles. Elastic fibers are present in areas of the body that undergo cycles of stretching and recoiling, such as arteries. Reticular fibers form meshlike networks that provide the base for other support structures. 

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